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Centerfire Rifles - Manually Operated Lever action, bolt action or other non gas operated centerfire rifles.

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  #41  
Old 06-06-2021, 9:57 PM
SmokeTheClay SmokeTheClay is offline
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$450 for the Vortex FFP is a great start

https://www.eurooptic.com/vortex-vip...43127-new.aspx
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  #42  
Old 06-07-2021, 7:54 AM
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A 22-250 with a 1-9 twist is not the same as one with a 1-12 twist when shooting 600 yards and further, 1-8, or better 1-7. Pay attention to twist rates of what you’re buying
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  #43  
Old 06-07-2021, 4:29 PM
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I was also just getting started with my first centerfire rifle last year and asked same question on this forum. I received lots of good info and feedback. Ended up getting a cheap Savage bolt action in .223 REM with a cheap scope. Getting 1 MOA groups at 100 yards with range bulk ammo. Have not taken out to longer distances yet.
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  #44  
Old 06-07-2021, 10:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yacko View Post
I agree with a lot of what you said except this.....

Your gear HAS to be better than you, or you can not improve to match it.

Top quality gear does NOT cover up 'deficiencies' on the shooters part. It makes it overwhelmingly obvious the shooter is the deficiency cuz the rifle can do it.... and the shooter cant....

Disagree? well.... I'll let you borrow Dads charter arms 6 shot snub and you can take it to any hand gun class you want. When you cant hit a large cardboard box at 7 yards no matter how good you are... you want to blame the gun. And you would be right......

On the other hand.... you say having a top notch setup is a crutch..... and a good shooter could do it anyway.....


POS charter arms snubby 32 for sale... Unless money wants to borrow it for a training session at frontsite......
I'm saying spending spending good money on top of the line kit while having lacking fundamentals will still equal poor results. According to the OP it's his first rifle and even if he/shes a proficient pistola shooter moving to a rifle to shoot LR requires different techniques. Sure practice with a .22LR will be cheap, but the lack of poor body mechanics will/may not show in your groups until you try to shoot a caliber with a bit more giddy up. IMHO during live fire a competent shooter will know what they did wrong by the time the bullet hits the target. A very competent shooter will know what they did wrong when he/she dry fires.

Last edited by Munny$hot; 06-07-2021 at 11:20 PM..
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  #45  
Old 06-08-2021, 1:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Munny$hot View Post
I'm saying spending spending good money on top of the line kit while having lacking fundamentals will still equal poor results. According to the OP it's his first rifle and even if he/shes a proficient pistola shooter moving to a rifle to shoot LR requires different techniques. Sure practice with a .22LR will be cheap, but the lack of poor body mechanics will/may not show in your groups until you try to shoot a caliber with a bit more giddy up. IMHO during live fire a competent shooter will know what they did wrong by the time the bullet hits the target. A very competent shooter will know what they did wrong when he/she dry fires.
The most useful thing for a new shooter is shots downrange. If I was new, I'd want to get as many shots downrange as possible.

The OP mentioned spending constraints. For that reason, a 22lr would be the best way to get 1000 rounds, for example, downrange at the cheapest amount.

A RPR rifle in 22lr would also give him experience fitting the rifle to his body to see what he likes/dislikes when it's time to upgrade.

Considering every shooter should have a 22lr, might as well make that the first purchase.

A 22lr RPR + the vortex above + good rings (I like badger ordnance) + 1000 rounds would cost about $1000. After the OP figured out what he likes and has a bunch of shots downrange, he could upgrade the rifle and stick that vortex on the new rig.

At today's prices, 1000 rounds of some other caliber will likely cost the OP $1000 alone. And if he wants competent ammunition it's going to cost north of $1000

Last edited by SmokeTheClay; 06-08-2021 at 1:25 PM..
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  #46  
Old 06-08-2021, 2:04 PM
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Default Long Range

I wanted to try out some long range/accuracy bolt action shooting on a poor man's budget. I was lucky and bought a couple of used Savages. First a model 10 BA Stealth in .308 last year from Turners and a model 11 in .223 just this month from a member. About $450 each as pictured. Savage would be your best bang for the buck.



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Last edited by BigBoyPinoy; 06-29-2021 at 10:45 AM..
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  #47  
Old 06-08-2021, 7:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Munny$hot View Post
I'm saying spending spending good money on top of the line kit while having lacking fundamentals will still equal poor results. According to the OP it's his first rifle and even if he/shes a proficient pistola shooter moving to a rifle to shoot LR requires different techniques. Sure practice with a .22LR will be cheap, but the lack of poor body mechanics will/may not show in your groups until you try to shoot a caliber with a bit more giddy up. IMHO during live fire a competent shooter will know what they did wrong by the time the bullet hits the target. A very competent shooter will know what they did wrong when he/she dry fires.
OK.

I'll agree. I misunderstood your original post as using good gear to cover up lack of fundamentals. Where good gear shows a persons weakness with nothing to blame but themselves. And yeah.... fundamentals matter, and a low recoil cartridge with a brake, you can get away with it... but a big boomer... nope... you dont....
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  #48  
Old 06-09-2021, 12:08 AM
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The obvious answer is .22LR.

However, within the first sentence the OP mentions long range shooting. Fine.

If you want to play with the big dogs than a MN and 440 round spamcan
should keep you busy long enough to test your commitment.
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  #49  
Old 06-09-2021, 1:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeTheClay View Post
The most useful thing for a new shooter is shots downrange. If I was new, I'd want to get as many shots downrange as possible.

The OP mentioned spending constraints. For that reason, a 22lr would be the best way to get 1000 rounds, for example, downrange at the cheapest amount.

A RPR rifle in 22lr would also give him experience fitting the rifle to his body to see what he likes/dislikes when it's time to upgrade.

Considering every shooter should have a 22lr, might as well make that the first purchase.

A 22lr RPR + the vortex above + good rings (I like badger ordnance) + 1000 rounds would cost about $1000. After the OP figured out what he likes and has a bunch of shots downrange, he could upgrade the rifle and stick that vortex on the new rig.

At today's prices, 1000 rounds of some other caliber will likely cost the OP $1000 alone. And if he wants competent ammunition it's going to cost north of $1000
That may make the OP a competent .22 "LR" (LR definitely doesn't stand for "Long Range) plinker ,but if he/she decides to upgrade to an Oh' boy caliber all that .22 live fire ain't gonna mean squat. The OP would be better off with a Savage Axis/Weaver (not recommending due to it's ability to hold groups when the barrel heats up, but it fits the basic criteria)scope combo @ 299.00 in .223, .308, .270, 6.5, 30-06, etc 400 rounds of ammo @ 400.00 of ammo and a good 2 day class @ 300.00 and end up with enough knowledge and skill to become an effective rifle shooter for the same 1K .22LR budget. Is a .22 LR good cheap practice, sure if you have all the fundamentals down, but dry fire is just as/if not more effective and it's free.

This kind of reminds me of a guy at the range with his shinny brand new 1-8 NightForce ATACR, he was sending a bunch of lead down range trying to sight in his scope at 50 yards. First problem he had no idea if his scope was in mils or moa, 2nd he had no idea how much each click moved his scope at 50 yards, 3rd he could have simply used his reticle to measure how much to move his POA to his POI to adjusted accordingly and have sighted it in with 2-3 rounds. Due to lack of knowledge he thought he could just figure it out. After I tried to explain it to him, he said "I got it" and continued to blast away. He even had a friend that was look though a spotting scope trying to call where the hits where landing, while he kept on cranking on the adjusters and kept sending costly noneffetive lead into the berm.

Also a good friend of mine had a .38 special he had hidden some where in his garage because his wife didn't like guns. He hadn't shot it in 25+ years. Fast forward his son gifts him a gen 4 glock 17 inner family transfer and he goes to shoot it. He calls me the same day and says somethings wrong and every once in a while he gets a stove pipe, immediately say he's limp wristing it, told to stop being a PU#@* and hold it like a man that your wife should have married, he pauses, then breaks out in tearful laughter. After I explained how it happens and how to avoid it he said it made sense because it only happened when his wife shot the gun. Just think about how many rounds or worse he ends up selling the gen 4 glock cheap because he thinks somethings wrong with it. The moral of the story is without proper instructions or training chances of becoming an effective self taught shooter is not easily accomplished.

Last edited by Munny$hot; 06-09-2021 at 2:24 AM..
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  #50  
Old 06-09-2021, 9:23 AM
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Get a Remington 700 because it is the best foundation you could possibly start with in a factory rifle and it has the most aftermarket support.

New around $400 used around $350 and if you decide you like rifles you have the best foundation for upgrading.
I'm not a big fan of starting small and working your way up so I will leave the chamberings debate for those that like to debate.
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  #51  
Old 06-09-2021, 7:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiterabbit View Post
6mm rpr is ideal. Do you reload? If not, I suggest 308 win.
I agree. You can get tons of .308 match ammo for pretty cheap, especially if you don't reload.
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  #52  
Old 06-09-2021, 11:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Munny$hot View Post
I'm saying spending spending good money on top of the line kit while having lacking fundamentals will still equal poor results. According to the OP it's his first rifle and even if he/shes a proficient pistola shooter moving to a rifle to shoot LR requires different techniques. Sure practice with a .22LR will be cheap, but the lack of poor body mechanics will/may not show in your groups until you try to shoot a caliber with a bit more giddy up. IMHO during live fire a competent shooter will know what they did wrong by the time the bullet hits the target. A very competent shooter will know what they did wrong when he/she dry fires.
To me, the main thing that needs to be understood about LR shooting.
- the gun is the cheapest thing you’ll buy.

if that seems expensive, consider something else.

i’ve seen new shooters become great in 6 months by spending the $10k-$15k up front for the best almost everything, plus lessons and practice.

i’ve also seen people shooting for years with budget stuff and still don’t know how to read mirage, call wind, read misses, etc...

to me, cheap/budget gear severely limits your ability to learn and focus on fundamentals.

perfect example is seeing trace, even a great shoot will struggle to see trace with budget gear.
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  #53  
Old 06-10-2021, 8:27 AM
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What? So like you need a $600 bipod to see trace? You can't see it with a $50 Caldwell?
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  #54  
Old 06-10-2021, 8:47 AM
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Everyone wants to be a sniper.
My buddy wants to get into long range and is going to start off with 300 PRC.
I can’t seem to get through it’s too much gun for newb.
Start off with 223 or 6.5 CM or 308 if you must have a bigger caliber.
Bull barrel is really intended for bench shooting only.
Anyways. Quality scope is a must. I’m so sick and tired of hearing about vortex and their “ warranty “…. That should be your hint
Start small and work your way up. Lot cheaper to learn how to dial and read wind with cheaper ammo vs Magnums
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  #55  
Old 06-10-2021, 9:14 AM
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Folks trash talking about different brands of optics should know that most of these brands don't make their own scopes. Vortex sources OEM/ODM scopes of varying grade from China, Japan, and Philippines..

Vortex Razor made by Light Optics Works in Japan will be superior as well as more expensive than Vortex Strike Eagle made by Miao Optics in China.


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  #56  
Old 06-10-2021, 9:36 AM
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Sounds like since OP is a beginner all he needs is a Ruger 10/20 with a pretty good scope.
If things look great, get a Savage + Scope as your next step.

Lucky me I was able to score a Savage M10 in wood with Accutrigger in .223. $450
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  #57  
Old 06-10-2021, 11:20 AM
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N-D7100-1952-Web.jpg

My Savage M10 (Trophy Hunter) in .223. 22"barrel, 1:9 twist. The scope is a Leupold 4.5-14x40. I also use a Harris Bi-pod.

It will shoot 1 MOA at 100 yards all day long using factory ammo. Yes, the barrel heats up. I use a barrel cooler from Barrel Cool that works quite well.

At some point, I'll change out the barrel for one more target/bench-oriented, but for now, it shoots nicely, and recoil is easily manageable.

Savage makes a fine rifle for the price point.
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  #58  
Old 06-10-2021, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sigstroker View Post
What? So like you need a $600 bipod to see trace? You can't see it with a $50 Caldwell?
no, but it helps

how can you expect someone to get better
when they have a smaller margin of error than a top level shooter to get the same results.

you get better by understanding what a good shot is, and consistently repeating and refine it.

not going to learn anything shooting a 10lb .308, and having to ask people if you hit the target
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  #59  
Old 06-11-2021, 8:51 AM
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The cheapest one, in general. Find out if you enjoy shooting it first. Go on gunbroker or this site and you'll find a lot of guys that built the "ultimate" fill in the blank gun and never even shoot it. Don't be one of those guys..(kcheung , wong time dufus)

Last edited by gunsfortyranny; 06-11-2021 at 12:25 PM..
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  #60  
Old 06-11-2021, 9:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JackEllis View Post
Here's the thing. Your rifle and ammunition are not unimportant, but beyond about 300 yards the biggest variable is likely to be wind. If you can't ready the wind, the rest of it doesn't matter.

I had a .30-06 for hunting but the next rifle I bought was a .22 and I found plenty of ways to challenge myself with it. Start off by putting all of your rounds inside an 8" target at 50 yards. When that becomes easy, move the target to 100yards. After that reduce the size of the target to 4". Then set out clay birds and try breaking them using a 50 yard zero and a holdover (don't mess with the scope). Then build yourself a little rig to hold spent shotgun hulls and start at 25 yards. Shoot from a bench, from the prone position, off sticks, off a tripod, standing, sitting, kneeling. Then graduate to off-hand.

The rifle is cheaper, you can use a less expensive scope, and you can shoot ten or more rounds of .22, even at today's absurd ammo prices, for the cost of a single centerfire round in just about any caliber.
I advise new rifle shooters to first get a reliable 22lr. Learn that and transfer the experience to something more powerful.
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  #61  
Old 06-11-2021, 9:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gunsfortyranny View Post
The cheapest one, in general. Find out if you enjoy shooting it first. Go on gunbroker or this site and you'll find a lot of guys that built the "ultimate" fill in the blank gun and never even shoot it. Don't be one of those guys.
This dude knows, don't be like him, he's "one of those guys"
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Old 06-11-2021, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcheung2 View Post
This dude knows, don't be like him, he's "one of those guys"
I see one of "you" "guys......i think" showed up to the party. Leave your ego at the doorstep.

Last edited by gunsfortyranny; 06-11-2021 at 12:26 PM..
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  #63  
Old 06-14-2021, 4:33 PM
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OP never owned a rifle before, eh? That's every one of us at some point.

This notion of having to spend a bunch of money on a first rifle, or optics for said first rifle, is HOGWASH. Sniper Central made this clear with their 6-4-6 setup. Yes, it's accurate.

https://www.snipercentral.com/600-for-600/

And that's for a whole system. So, for under $1,000 for the total package, including optics and a decent bipod, the OP can get a pretty good setup. I've done it.

Another other option is to get, say, a .243 Winchester or similar light-ish recoiling round in, say, a Savage Axis or 10/110-series, or Remington 700, or Weatherby Vanguard, Ruger American, Mossberg Patriot, or similar quality, inexpensive rifle. I suggest the .243 Win because it's (normally) one of the four rounds that you can find anywhere.

I also have to agree with the .22LR suggestion. It's a good one, and the same skills that you need for shooting 1,000 yards and beyond are the same ones you will learn by shooting a .22LR at, say, 200-300 yards.

In either case, someone said don't buy a $250 scope. Again, HOGWASH. Before the ranges closed down for the COVID-19 virus, I was shooting at 1,000 yards with $250 scopes. OP is new and thus needs to first shoot at 100 yards, then 200, then 300, etc. until he gets proficient to, say, 600 yards. That's the max distance at CMP Talladega's range, so that's fair. Once the OP gets proficient at that distance, which will take LOTS of practice...then...take that very same gear and extend your range gradually to 1,000.

OP, you do *NOT* need to spend a boatload of money on a basic, good setup. Those who tell you otherwise are generally one of three things:

1.) not knowledgeable and just spouting what they see on Internet forums,

2.) gun snobs, or

3.) actual good shooters (e. g. Randall and some others here on CalGuns) who are used to top-notch gear, but at their level, they can justify that kind of gear. The OP is far from there yet (so am I, for that matter).

The *MOST IMPORTANT* thing is to get proper training, followed by range time doing Practice, Practice, Practice. Ain't no substitute for experience.
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  #64  
Old 06-14-2021, 7:02 PM
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The only thing I take issue with in your post is including the Mossberg Patriot in your list of possibilities. I bought one, and regret it. It is a piece of crap.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowboy T View Post
OP never owned a rifle before, eh? That's every one of us at some point.

This notion of having to spend a bunch of money on a first rifle, or optics for said first rifle, is HOGWASH. Sniper Central made this clear with their 6-4-6 setup. Yes, it's accurate.

https://www.snipercentral.com/600-for-600/

And that's for a whole system. So, for under $1,000 for the total package, including optics and a decent bipod, the OP can get a pretty good setup. I've done it.

Another other option is to get, say, a .243 Winchester or similar light-ish recoiling round in, say, a Savage Axis or 10/110-series, or Remington 700, or Weatherby Vanguard, Ruger American, Mossberg Patriot, or similar quality, inexpensive rifle. I suggest the .243 Win because it's (normally) one of the four rounds that you can find anywhere.

I also have to agree with the .22LR suggestion. It's a good one, and the same skills that you need for shooting 1,000 yards and beyond are the same ones you will learn by shooting a .22LR at, say, 200-300 yards.

In either case, someone said don't buy a $250 scope. Again, HOGWASH. Before the ranges closed down for the COVID-19 virus, I was shooting at 1,000 yards with $250 scopes. OP is new and thus needs to first shoot at 100 yards, then 200, then 300, etc. until he gets proficient to, say, 600 yards. That's the max distance at CMP Talladega's range, so that's fair. Once the OP gets proficient at that distance, which will take LOTS of practice...then...take that very same gear and extend your range gradually to 1,000.

OP, you do *NOT* need to spend a boatload of money on a basic, good setup. Those who tell you otherwise are generally one of three things:

1.) not knowledgeable and just spouting what they see on Internet forums,

2.) gun snobs, or

3.) actual good shooters (e. g. Randall and some others here on CalGuns) who are used to top-notch gear, but at their level, they can justify that kind of gear. The OP is far from there yet (so am I, for that matter).

The *MOST IMPORTANT* thing is to get proper training, followed by range time doing Practice, Practice, Practice. Ain't no substitute for experience.
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  #65  
Old 06-14-2021, 8:14 PM
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Can't say how many of these "What's the BEST long range rifle?" followed by the "I have $1000 to spend!" posts over the years.

If you really are serious, I'd suggest going the .22lr route as a starter to learn the ropes first. Don't blow all your money on what will be a compromise centerfire set-up that you will want to replace as soon as you start understanding the sport.

Look into a good .22lr rifle and develop the tools for shooting a bolty first for cheap. As your skills improve, many will be transferrable to centerfire, plus you will be learning about what to invest-in when you are ready for that precision rifle.

.22s are lame? You won't think that if you can put five rounds into a dime-sized circle at 50-yards.
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  #66  
Old 06-14-2021, 8:40 PM
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Wildcard: build an AR in 224 valkyrie.

Throw on something like this

https://www.primaryarms.com/pa-3-18x...-6-5cm-reticle

I've seen 224 in stock at Sportsmans and Basspro with regularity throughout the rona timeline.

If you end up not liking or being able to find spots with 300-1000 yards, you still have a sweet gun, and you can always build another upper in 556 later.

I'd really make sure you have areas closeby that you can legally shoot on with 500+ yards. You can hit 8" gongs at 300 yards with 223/556 pretty easily..and I do mean easily.

Seriously, you get a cost effective, reliable platform that you can still stretch out to 800-1000 with 556/223, 224, etc. The ammo is much more inexpensive than the other options you're considering.

If you have a friend with an AR, buy 100 rounds, and ask if you can shoot with him. You'll probably be surprised what you can do.
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Old 06-15-2021, 4:21 AM
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The only thing I take issue with in your post is including the Mossberg Patriot in your list of possibilities. I bought one, and regret it. It is a piece of crap.
OK, then a Howa. :-)

Personally, I liked the Mossberg Patriot that I shot. Like most models of bolt rifle made these days, it could outshoot me. Unfortunate that yours turned out not to be so good.
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Old 06-15-2021, 9:46 PM
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Can't say how many of these "What's the BEST long range rifle?" followed by the "I have $1000 to spend!" posts over the years.

If you really are serious, I'd suggest going the .22lr route as a starter to learn the ropes first. Don't blow all your money on what will be a compromise centerfire set-up that you will want to replace as soon as you start understanding the sport.

Look into a good .22lr rifle and develop the tools for shooting a bolty first for cheap. As your skills improve, many will be transferrable to centerfire, plus you will be learning about what to invest-in when you are ready for that precision rifle.

.22s are lame? You won't think that if you can put five rounds into a dime-sized circle at 50-yards.
22lr is the most fun at 100-200 yards, especially when its blowing
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Old 06-15-2021, 10:16 PM
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Not for everyone. I hate shooting .22, it's boring.
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Old 06-16-2021, 6:56 AM
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OP, I agree with sigtroker, in that I think you'd get bored with .22 rather quickly.

Also, there is learning how to deal with recoil. You would not get that with .22. Yes, you could learn other rifle shooting skills with .22, but recoil changes the equation.

In my opinion, .223 is a good place to start, and there are a ton of nice rifles in that caliber that won't break the bank.
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Old 06-16-2021, 8:28 AM
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In my opinion, .223 is a good place to start, and there are a ton of nice rifles in that caliber that won't break the bank.
-P
And most of them don't have a 1:8 twist to let you shoot 80-82gr bullets which it what you are going to need for shooting longrange.
So pick carefully...
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Old 06-16-2021, 10:02 AM
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A lot of great feedback, but problem with 22LR, 223, etc is there is a risk you may "grow out" of it. Then again, you may decide bolt action isn't for you and you may be glad you didn't shell out big(ger) bucks for a 308 or 6.5.

There's no one right answer for everyone.
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Old 06-16-2021, 2:10 PM
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A lot of great feedback, but problem with 22LR, 223, etc is there is a risk you may "grow out" of it. Then again, you may decide bolt action isn't for you and you may be glad you didn't shell out big(ger) bucks for a 308 or 6.5.

There's no one right answer for everyone.
A. Buying one "big" gun, like a 6.5 PRC, and then deciding later you don't like it, and selling it means you lose a little money. If you do like it, you don't have to buy anything else.

B. You have almost the same problem going the .223 route if you don't like it. However, if you do like it, then you have to sell the .223 and buy something bigger. No matter what, you sell the .223 and lose money.

Option B is guaranteed to lose you some money, even if you end up liking long range.
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Old 06-16-2021, 3:37 PM
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A. Buying one "big" gun, like a 6.5 PRC, and then deciding later you don't like it, and selling it means you lose a little money. If you do like it, you don't have to buy anything else.

B. You have almost the same problem going the .223 route if you don't like it. However, if you do like it, then you have to sell the .223 and buy something bigger. No matter what, you sell the .223 and lose money.

Option B is guaranteed to lose you some money, even if you end up liking long range.
There are always options C and D

C. you buy a 223, say Remington with a 1-9 twist... you out grow, re barrel with a 1 in 7 or 1 in 8, continue to grow

D. you buy a 223, say Remington 700, out grow, buy new bolt and barrel appropriate for 6.5 creed more and carry on.
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Old 06-16-2021, 5:24 PM
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To play devils advocate most shooters never outgrow a 223.
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Old 06-17-2021, 6:19 AM
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Successful long range shooting is most easily achieved by pushing the highest BC bullet to the highest possible velocity while maintaining precision.*
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Old 06-17-2021, 8:05 AM
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Successful long range shooting is most easily achieved by pushing the highest BC bullet to the highest possible velocity while maintaining precision.*
There is a sliding scale where precision lives on one of the scale and recoil lives on the other end.
All guns fit somewhere in this scale with the highest precision ones generally being opposite the highest recoil ones.
With a $1000 budget limitation, custom heavy guns that cheat recoil through massive extra weight are not an option so the OP is limited to factory offerings and that means some velocity and recoil need to be sacrificed to find a good balance of precision and shooter comfort.
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Old 06-17-2021, 8:14 AM
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Yeah that was a quote from Bryan Litz but it's been true in every form of shooting.
If a 50 BMG or 416 Barrett stomps you into the ground your not going to be accurate so the guy shooting a 300 prc beats you.
If you've never fired a centerfire rifle before starting out big will give you a flinch in a lightweight factory rifle.

I think that's why Bryan said "while maintaining accuracy"
Same thing holds true in Benchrest at 600/1000 yards. If you go bigger and faster but can't maintain accuracy you still lose.
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Old 06-17-2021, 9:24 AM
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That's why I said 6.5 PRC way back at the beginning. 1600 yard performance, less felt recoil than a .308.
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Old 06-17-2021, 10:59 AM
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6.5 PRC has been very scarce since it hit the market. Its a cool round but bad advice for a newer shooter. A 6.5 Creedmoor does almost the same job at half the price and much easier to find post covid.
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