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  #1  
Old 08-13-2019, 3:53 PM
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Default Suggestions on stock repair

I recently purchased an abused Remington 572. One of my tasks is to repair the stock. I plan on sanding it smooth, and steaming out the dents. On the left side of the stock, it is severely gouged, and I am not sure how to proceed.

L side of stock.jpg

R side of stock.jpg

I took the stock to the Rockler Woodworking and Hardware Store in San Diego for advice and he suggested that I find another piece of wood of similar color and cut out a section of my stock and replace it with the new wood. This is beyond what I want to do. This stock can be replaced for about $50, but I want to do it myself. I am thinking of using wood putty, and coloring it with tint to match the wood as close as possible and putting it on the gouged out area and once it dries, sanding it to match the existing contours of the stock. The clerk at Rockler said that no matter how good of a job I do in matching the stock's color, the repair will stick out like a sore thumb. He may be correct. If I go with putty, is there any way to put a grain appearance in the putty?

Any other suggestions.
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Old 08-13-2019, 4:19 PM
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The guy at rockler is correct.

Sand down past the damaged area and re-shape the stock to cover up the fact that you removed a damaged area.
That leaves you all raw original wood to refinish.
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  #3  
Old 08-13-2019, 9:17 PM
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If you are up for spending the dough, Numrich has a used one for $48.75, here's the link:

https://www.gunpartscorp.com/products/1858940B
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Old 08-13-2019, 9:35 PM
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ol shooter, ebay and gunbroker have these stocks also. I did not want to replace the stock, I wanted to put some effort into it and try to remedy the defect as much as I can. The choice seems to be to either sand it down past the gouge or putty it. I can't decide which one would be visibly better.
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Old 08-13-2019, 10:26 PM
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You could take a little wood from under the buttplate. Use a drill, collect the dust, make filler from it. After blending it, use a soldering iron with fine point to try and simulate the grain.

Not sure if you would get enough sawdust from it though unless you bored a good size hole. I can’t see how deep the gouges are. And it still isn’t going to look perfect, so this is just a hypothetical fix.

Or like Randall said, just reshape the stock there, make that wrist a little thinner. That is going to look the best, if the gouges aren’t too deep.
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Old 08-14-2019, 3:10 AM
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The hours that would be spent on this project I would replace for 50.00 a used stock. What is your time worth.
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Old 08-14-2019, 4:56 AM
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A really good furniture repair guy can paint the grain back in. You can’t.
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Old 08-14-2019, 8:08 AM
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Putty always looks like crap. Always. Crap

Your only hope is to cut or sand that area off, flat and square, and glue on a piece of similar wood, orienting the grain appropriately. Reshape, refinish entire stock.
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Old 08-14-2019, 9:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shafferds View Post
The hours that would be spent on this project I would replace for 50.00 a used stock. What is your time worth.
This is not about maximizing my time and money. I bought the rifle knowing it was abuse. This is my project that I am doing for fun. I think I am going to find someone who repairs furniture and get a second opinion on this. If that person knows how to paint the grain into the stock, that may be a good option. Regardless, what ever I do, I'll post some after pics.

On a side note, I was looking for a Remington 572 because it was my first rifle and I sold it, and would like to have another. I found this rifle at an online auction. I got it for $170. When I got it, the barrel turned out to be a smoothbore, and those are currently auctioning off at around $1,300. The rifle appears to have been made in the mid 1950's to the early 1960's because it does not have a serial number.
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Old 08-14-2019, 9:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyD View Post
When I got it, the barrel turned out to be a smoothbore, and those are currently auctioning off at around $1,300. The rifle appears to have been made in the mid 1950's to the early 1960's because it does not have a serial number.
In that case, anything you do to the stock will diminish the value. I think the gouges add character, there is a story there.
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Old 08-14-2019, 9:35 AM
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If you decide to have it repaired to look nice, get a referral from a high end furniture store. If they sell $10,000 dining tables, they know or employ a guy.

If you’re going to sell it, I agree with Skyhawk.
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Old 08-14-2019, 9:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyD View Post
ol shooter, ebay and gunbroker have these stocks also. I did not want to replace the stock, I wanted to put some effort into it and try to remedy the defect as much as I can. The choice seems to be to either sand it down past the gouge or putty it. I can't decide which one would be visibly better.
Putty will look like what it is, and that's not good. An insert piece of wood will not match perfectly but if done correctly will look pretty good. The grain needs to flow in the same direction.The only glue that will take stain is hide glue, you mix it from its crystal form. Woodworking stores have it and some online retailers do also. If it were me I would strip it and do my best to raise the dents, I have a special iron for just that purpose.
Good luck.
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Last edited by 'ol shooter; 08-14-2019 at 10:01 AM..
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Old 08-14-2019, 10:58 AM
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Fill the gouged area with tinted acraglas. The tint color should match what the stained wood looks like. No putty or filler will accept stain after cured.

Search Brownell's web site for acraglas and tint options.
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Old 08-14-2019, 11:13 AM
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Putty will stand out ike a man with his fly open.

If it were me and I wanted a fun project I would cut out both sides of that spot and replace with a contrasting block of wood.
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Old 08-14-2019, 1:06 PM
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You got it for $170, and you say because of it's unique features it would sell for $1300...

ANY attempt to repair the wood is going to look somewhere between "meh" and "blech" and reduce the value of the gun as a vintage piece. Replacing the original stock would also affect the value/patina of the gun. There are some things you just have to let be as they are, and wear and tear on a vintage item often adds to the charm... They sell "new, pre worn" guitars at a ridiculous premium, because some people want something that looks like it's been "loved"!

Flip it at a discount (premium?) to that $1300, and buy one that is pristine if that's what you want, spend the rest on a nice dinner with the wife to negotiate the purchase of more fun new toys!
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Old 08-14-2019, 2:22 PM
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Long time furniture repair person with what I would do to this stock.
Steam the heck out of the damaged area.

After steaming use a sharp knife and start cutting parallel lines through the damaged areas. Do this a lot and cut as deep as needed until it just looks like a rough area. Steam the wood again. Cut more lines if needed and avoid sanding as you want to keep as much wood as possible.

When you have the rest of the stock ready to finish apply a layer of Acraglass over the prepared area. When set do a light sanding and at that point decide on a stain or finish for the stock.

Yes a faux finish or other colors can be applied to make the patch less visible. Powdered colors can be added to the Acraglass even cutting in layers of colored acraglass to simulate grain that will be permanent.

There are so many methods or finisher tricks that I can't possibly give away in a short post.

I've done this before with excellent results. It just depends on the wood colors and grain as to how well a spot repair can be blended.

irh

Please do not sand down and apply putty! There is a lot of wood that you want to keep. If it is still black after prepping it can be hidden with the right colors mixed into the glass.

Last edited by ironhorse1; 08-14-2019 at 2:33 PM..
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Old 08-14-2019, 5:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyD View Post
ol shooter, ebay and gunbroker have these stocks also. I did not want to replace the stock, I wanted to put some effort into it and try to remedy the defect as much as I can. The choice seems to be to either sand it down past the gouge or putty it. I can't decide which one would be visibly better.
If you really want to do the work yourself, you can also consider fixing the stock with putty, and then hydro dipping the whole thing. If done well, the stock and looks like a super high grade wood stock.
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Old 08-16-2019, 11:53 AM
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Randy I hope that you do well with this repair for the best possible result.

If you need further information about my repair method the why and how feel free to contact me. Email is in my profile.

If you don't want to get the Acraglas a 30 minute set time epoxy can be used instead.

If you need powdered colors I still have my repair kit full of supplies and I'm local near the 125.

I'm retired but still enjoy seeing things repaired well.

irh
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Old 08-16-2019, 7:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyD View Post
This is not about maximizing my time and money. I bought the rifle knowing it was abuse. This is my project that I am doing for fun. I think I am going to find someone who repairs furniture and get a second opinion on this. If that person knows how to paint the grain into the stock, that may be a good option. Regardless, what ever I do, I'll post some after pics.

On a side note, I was looking for a Remington 572 because it was my first rifle and I sold it, and would like to have another. I found this rifle at an online auction. I got it for $170. When I got it, the barrel turned out to be a smoothbore, and those are currently auctioning off at around $1,300. The rifle appears to have been made in the mid 1950's to the early 1960's because it does not have a serial number.
A mint condition smoothbore 572 sold for $750
https://www.gunsinternational.com/gu...n_id=101272982
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Old 08-16-2019, 11:40 PM
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I'd call It old-school stippling and roll with it.

Especially since the rough area is on the left side we're your fingers might actually even get a little better purchase.


Although if you're a lefty...



I don't think anyone can help you




Ever.
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  #21  
Old 08-20-2019, 10:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironhorse1 View Post
Randy I hope that you do well with this repair for the best possible result.

If you need further information about my repair method the why and how feel free to contact me. Email is in my profile.

If you don't want to get the Acraglas a 30 minute set time epoxy can be used instead.

If you need powdered colors I still have my repair kit full of supplies and I'm local near the 125.

I'm retired but still enjoy seeing things repaired well.

irh
Thanks. I'll send you an email.
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Old 08-20-2019, 10:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fjold View Post
A mint condition smoothbore 572 sold for $750
https://www.gunsinternational.com/gu...n_id=101272982
That rifle is in mint condition and has nice wood.
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