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Blades, Bows and Tools Discussion of non-firearm weapons and camping/survival tools.

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  #1  
Old 07-27-2018, 4:11 PM
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Default decent starter kit for 6'6" strong new archer?

I've taken a few lessons, I can hit the broad side of a barn, and I think the time has some to get my own bow.

I like the idea of a "bare" recurve bow for starting off... mostly for the simplicity and "honesty" of not using gear to hide my mistakes.

however, I'm 6'6", 315 lbs, left-handed, and I can lift a 70lb weight in a "dumbell row" without trouble (same motion as a bow draw, only one hand is on a bench, and the weight moves vertically).

also, I really dont' want to spend a fortune on this... if I could get out the door for $2-300 I'd be very happy.

I'm sure I'll advance, at some point, to competing or hunting with the bow, but that's a LONG way off... so this bow doesn't need to be THAT bow.

Any advice?
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  #2  
Old 07-27-2018, 5:00 PM
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Id check out the Samick Sage. They have different lengths for taller guys and lots of limbs to choose from. Im 6'0" 230 and found the 45lb limbs to be a good start. Starting light for your build and working on technique is the way to go, dont get too macho with your first set of limbs.
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  #3  
Old 07-27-2018, 9:45 PM
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I've been known to let my ego cut a check my muscles can't cash. :-)

Thanks! I've heard good things about the Sage. Kits online look to run under $300... thanks!
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  #4  
Old 07-27-2018, 9:47 PM
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I would suggest going to a quality archery shop and shooting what ever they have and see what you like. If leaning toward a recurve/long bow, you need to look into something at least 62" long due to your draw length. Also being left handed limits what many shops may have. Just FYI, "rowing" a 70 dumbell isn't really the as drawing and holding a 70lb recurve bow.
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  #5  
Old 07-27-2018, 9:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobG View Post
I would suggest going to a quality archery shop and shooting what ever they have and see what you like. If leaning toward a recurve/long bow, you need to look into something at least 62" long due to your draw length. Also being left handed limits what many shops may have.
There's a pretty good archery shop near my job (HiTech), they have a whole training range upstairs, but it's mostly set up to teach 12 year old girls who just saw Hunger Games... teenage instructors, lots of low-weight bows.

I also don't trust sales people. Figured I'd get some advice here first.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobG View Post
Just FYI, "rowing" a 70 dumbell isn't really the as drawing and holding a 70lb recurve bow.
No doubt! I was offering that simply as an example of something I can do "for scale".
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  #6  
Old 07-27-2018, 10:08 PM
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Yeah if you can find a decent archery shop they will let you test drive a few bows and measure you to get the right size and draw length etc.
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  #7  
Old 07-27-2018, 10:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigFatGuy View Post
There's a pretty good archery shop near my job (HiTech), they have a whole training range upstairs, but it's mostly set up to teach 12 year old girls who just saw Hunger Games... teenage instructors, lots of low-weight bows.

I also don't trust sales people. Figured I'd get some advice here first.


No doubt! I was offering that simply as an example of something I can do "for scale".
It is tough to find a good shop in the "internet buying" age we are in. Most good shops will either have bows set up or set them up for you to try. There will always be the "salesman" part of the equation to deal with. Remember there is nothing that says you must buy. Just go into it with the mindset that you are "feeling" things out with actually buying something being secondary. Good luck man! I have been shooting on and off for close to 40 years and still dig it.
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  #8  
Old 07-30-2018, 1:16 PM
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It doesn't matter how strong you are in other areas of your life, start with a kiddie weight bow and work your way up. Archery muscles are not the ones you use anywhere else.

Samick Sage, PSE Heritage Series, Ragim, all will do fine. Set yourself up with 25-30# limbs and work on your form. Many experienced and accomplished archers work kiddie-weight bows (sub-40#) regularly. Nothing reveals form flaws like a light weight bow. Any modular option, like the above production take-down recurves, will get you up and running and will allow you to scale up the limbs for hunting once you're able to shoot consistent groups with lighter weight bows. But don't be in a hurry to scale up the draw weight. Being overbowed is one of the main reasons people develop target panic or injure themselves.

If possible, work with a local shop for the risers & limbs. I have a Samick Sage and have had a little difficulty interchanging parts on my left-handed riser. In theory, it should all fit. But in practice, it's never quite as good as the theory. It's good to have a shop that can help get replacement parts & send stuff back to the manufacturer if needed.
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  #9  
Old 07-30-2018, 6:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CVShooter View Post
It doesn't matter how strong you are in other areas of your life, start with a kiddie weight bow and work your way up. Archery muscles are not the ones you use anywhere else.

Samick Sage, PSE Heritage Series, Ragim, all will do fine. Set yourself up with 25-30# limbs and work on your form. Many experienced and accomplished archers work kiddie-weight bows (sub-40#) regularly. Nothing reveals form flaws like a light weight bow. Any modular option, like the above production take-down recurves, will get you up and running and will allow you to scale up the limbs for hunting once you're able to shoot consistent groups with lighter weight bows. But don't be in a hurry to scale up the draw weight. Being overbowed is one of the main reasons people develop target panic or injure themselves.

If possible, work with a local shop for the risers & limbs. I have a Samick Sage and have had a little difficulty interchanging parts on my left-handed riser. In theory, it should all fit. But in practice, it's never quite as good as the theory. It's good to have a shop that can help get replacement parts & send stuff back to the manufacturer if needed.
I agree with what CV has said.

I started with a 40 lb Samick sage. Although it worked out and Iíve become decent enough to hit rabbit at 20 yards, it did slow my learning curve. I would have been much better suited starting with a 25lb bow and really learning proper form. Archery is entirely form dependent and bow weight makes that difficult to perfect. Kind of like trying to learn to golf starting with a driver - youíre better off starting with an iron.

I have moved to a 45# bear Montana longbow and absolutely love the thing.

The heavier drawback of starting with a light bow is that you will need a new set of arrows when you step up the bow weight. Spine stiffness and weight front of center is a big variable and arrow tuning can be tedious.
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  #10  
Old 07-30-2018, 9:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CVShooter View Post
It doesn't matter how strong you are in other areas of your life, start with a kiddie weight bow and work your way up. Archery muscles are not the ones you use anywhere else.
but I wanna be big and STRONG!

Yeah, I see your wisdom.

Thanks, all.
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  #11  
Old 08-01-2018, 11:08 AM
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The South West Archery Spider II is a refined version of the Samick Sage, and competitively priced.

Because of your height-get the 62" limbs.

Start with low draw weight limbs, 35 or 40 lb. Its not how much weight you can draw, but how many (hundreds) of times you can effectively draw aim and release without fatigue in a single session.
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  #12  
Old 08-01-2018, 1:50 PM
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Personally, I wouldn't worry much at all about arrow shafts. For sub 30# limbs and strictly working on form, almost anything will work. I draw on the shorter side (27" or so) so I learned with some cheapo arrows that cost about $1 each on Amazon. On 30# limbs, I still had plenty of fun & learning out to 70 yards. Ideal? No. But good enough for an education? Yes.

I also got some carbon shafts from the shop. They set me up with something more appropriate for a 65# bow, I later learned. I shot them off the 30# limbs and they still flew good enough for target practice. They were a lot slower due to the heavier mass. But they still grouped just fine. Once again, not ideal for hunting but fine for an education on hay bales.

Spine is critical for hunting, important for expert shooters and only marginally worth thinking about for beginners. A centershot riser hides a lot.
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Old 08-01-2018, 2:30 PM
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I was searching for a basic traditional bow a while back and was warned to stay away from he Sammick Sage... or any of their other bows. This was all from ArcheryTalk. Apparently, 2 years ago or so their bows were a great bargain, but now they are trash. Again, no experience personally, this is just the opinion of several folks on that site.

They all recommended looking into South West Archery, specifically the Scorpion longbow.

I am 6'4" and have a draw length on my compound bow of 31.5-inches. For traditional bows, I have a longer draw because I don't use a release. With that said, I recently shot the PSE Razorback at Turner's which is a 62" recurve and it stacked to the point of uncomfortable noises and weight before I could anchor. For your height, I think 66" is the shorted OAL I would consider for a recurve. I know that's outside of the norm for recuvre size, but you and I are outside of the norm in size.

If you aren't hard set on a recurve, I would consider the South West Archery Scorpion.

If you have to buy a shorter bow that stacks, consider installing a d loop and using a release to allow for a shorter draw.

Edit: For hunting, the shorter and lighter the bow, the better... but if this isn't that bow, then I wouldn't worry about height for now and just get a solid bow that's tall enough to not have stacking issues. If you love it and want to hunt with a traditional bow, it'll pay to have one made for you and your draw or to invest in a higher-end mfr that can cater to your size with shorter limbs. And that won't be in the $200-$300 range.

Last edited by TheReluctantCraftstronaut; 08-01-2018 at 2:34 PM..
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  #14  
Old 08-01-2018, 3:34 PM
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as it turns out, there's a system of limb attachment (ILF?) that basically lets you get your riser and limbs from different vendors, and reaching a length of up to 70" isn't difficult any longer.

Maximum weight of the box is slightly limited, but for a practice/training/do-I-like-this bow it's not bad... especially given the number of people advising me to start at a lower-than-appears-manly weight.

It'll raise my starting costs from about $300 to about $450, but I guess I've got a job for a reason. :-)

Thanks, all! Time to start saving up.
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  #15  
Old 08-01-2018, 4:08 PM
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The ILF system is great in that you can run limbs from various builders on risers from various builders. But like you said, getting into an ILF set up is not cheap. Something to consider is buying used. Archerytalk.com has a huge sale forum with everything you could ever want.

You need to determine your draw length to get the correct riser and limbs. Every shop has a cheapie bow/arrow combo for measuring. The other way is to stand up straight, hold both arms up so that you form a "T" and have someone measure from the tip of middle finger to tip of middle finger and divide by 2.5. That should give you a rough estimate. Generally, a traditional style bow will draw around 2" shorter than a compound. So if you end up with 32" in the measurement, you'd be looking at around 30" for a longbow/recurve.
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  #16  
Old 08-01-2018, 6:01 PM
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Hi Tech is a legit shop. I’d go to them and start establishing a rapport. They will put you in good gear as well as let you test a bow. Your size and build may make many bows unsuitable.
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Old 08-01-2018, 8:32 PM
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Like fishing gear, depreciation on archery gear is brutal. Check eBay and the other forums where >50% off new is commonplace.
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