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  #1  
Old 09-03-2019, 10:43 PM
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Default Fixing a crack in wood stock.

I would replace the wood but there doesnít seem to be any place with a replacement. So I might try to fix it for now.

The wood is not broken off but there is a horizontal crack along the stock.

So far I found titebond waterproof glue. Is this the best wood glue for the stock repair?

I figure the crack is because it was replaced and when it was it was not fitted correctly. The barrel channel needs to be sanded more I think so there is more space around the barrel.
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Old 09-03-2019, 11:06 PM
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If you don't care about appearance or want to give it the "battle-scarred" look, as long as there's enough wood in the area, drill through along the crack and insert dowels with carpenter's glue. Clamp it down, wait for it to cure, sand & stain, then varnish.
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  #3  
Old 09-04-2019, 12:59 AM
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I like to use wood shavings and wood glue
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Old 09-04-2019, 1:03 AM
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Nah Iíve seen some interesting patch work before like brass plates with brass nails and stuff like that.

Iíll might try refinishing it or just a oil finish.
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Old 09-04-2019, 1:05 AM
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Wood shavings I’ve read about maybe for guitar fret boards.. I’ll look into that. The crack is just a hairline crack though. Not really noticeable I just figure it needs to be refitted and the split sealed.
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Old 09-04-2019, 4:59 AM
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depends on where the crack is located. You may need to reinforce the area or even pin it internally but no idea without a picture of the area and crack
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Old 09-04-2019, 7:10 AM
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Titebond is probably the best wood glue on the market.

I have tested most of what is available and have been using Titebond as the clear winner.

I never recommend doweling as that breaks through a lot of straight grain and you lose the strength of the grain run.

The biggest problem with stock cracks is due to oil getting into the wood.

If the crack is clean then force a lot of glue into the area by both opening the crack, if possible and laying glue into the crack. Vigorously rub the glue into the opening.

Wood glue requires clamping for the best possible bond.

irh
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Old 09-04-2019, 7:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Q View Post
I would replace the wood but there doesn’t seem to be any place with a replacement. So I might try to fix it for now.

The wood is not broken off but there is a horizontal crack along the stock.

So far I found titebond waterproof glue. Is this the best wood glue for the stock repair?

I figure the crack is because it was replaced and when it was it was not fitted correctly. The barrel channel needs to be sanded more I think so there is more space around the barrel.
Pictures would help a lot , so would a description of make , model of the rifle.
Arisakas for instance have what looks like a horizontal crack in the stock . This is from the fact that Japan didn't have a lot of trees , so they pieced together stocks out of 2 pieces. So after a number of years it would look like a horizontal crack .

And as to free floating the barrel , are you sure it is necessary ? Some shoot better with a couple of pressure points along the way .

Is this on that GEW you have ?
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Last edited by Capt.Dunsel; 09-04-2019 at 7:25 AM.. Reason: added a question
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Old 09-04-2019, 9:28 AM
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Acraglas (Brownells) to fix crack. Good prep work needed. Once dried and stock solid, dremel out SMALL groove along crack. Apply superglue along crack and lightly sand stock in area of crack allowing sawdust from sanding to stick to super glue. Existing stock wood used to cover repair.
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Old 09-04-2019, 9:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironhorse1 View Post
Titebond is probably the best wood glue on the market.

I have tested most of what is available and have been using Titebond as the clear winner.

I never recommend doweling as that breaks through a lot of straight grain and you lose the strength of the grain run.

The biggest problem with stock cracks is due to oil getting into the wood.

If the crack is clean then force a lot of glue into the area by both opening the crack, if possible and laying glue into the crack. Vigorously rub the glue into the opening.

Wood glue requires clamping for the best possible bond.

irh

While I agree with the dowel comment that was not what I meant by pinning the stock.
Brownell's makes brass stock pins for repairs
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Old 09-04-2019, 9:59 AM
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My Finnish M39 with tiger stripe stock has a small hairline crack (shorter than .5"). I used a syringe to inject wood glue into the narrow space.

Last edited by hoozaru; 09-04-2019 at 10:01 AM..
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Old 09-04-2019, 11:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcstott View Post
While I agree with the dowel comment that was not what I meant by pinning the stock.
Brownell's makes brass stock pins for repairs
Wood or brass it still requires drilling a hole. I have repaired 100's of wood items and will not cross pin unless I can do a blind dowel that is not seen.

What I have seen on wood table legs as a good example is when they have been drilled and crack again the wood shatters.

Now a new piece has to be sectioned into the broken area as there are now too many breaks to glue or pin. In the worse cases a new leg had to be cut and shaped.

Some areas can have wood screws installed which needs a lot smaller hole
However I would not do this in the wrist area.

irh
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Old 09-04-2019, 1:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt.Dunsel View Post
Pictures would help a lot , so would a description of make , model of the rifle.
Arisakas for instance have what looks like a horizontal crack in the stock . This is from the fact that Japan didn't have a lot of trees , so they pieced together stocks out of 2 pieces. So after a number of years it would look like a horizontal crack .

And as to free floating the barrel , are you sure it is necessary ? Some shoot better with a couple of pressure points along the way .

Is this on that GEW you have ?
Now everyone knows I have a gew I may have to keep this one a secret.
Itís not a gew but it is a antique. I actually bought another gew that I got really cheap and it is pretty cool to because itís a custom gew looks to have been customized more than 60 yrs ago at least.
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Old 09-04-2019, 1:29 PM
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I had a small crack/splinter on the the edge of an SKS stock.

I was refinishing it, so I used some Titebond II, clamped it down, let it dry, then applied some shellac to the hairline crack that remained and sanded it lightly before it cured (mixing the saw dust and shellac to fill the remaining hairline crack). Did the sand/shellac procedure a couple times to the crack then applied a few coats of shellac to the entire stock which was already ready to be refinished. Came out great, canít see it, especially since the original crack followed the grain, smooth to touch.
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Old 09-04-2019, 4:07 PM
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Well it is not a .5 crack itís like a 5Ē crack.

Ok I guess the clamp is a must. I guess Iíll try titebond if or when I try this wood project.

Not sure if I want a oil finish or a glossy finish. I think oil looks cooler but glossy probably helps hold it together even more.
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Old 09-04-2019, 5:55 PM
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If the crack is clean and can be pushed back together for a perfect fit:

Use some wood glue, and push it all the way down into the crack with a thin needle. Take your time and get the glue ALL the way in. Now flex the crack open and closed to suck more of the glue into the crack. Then clamp it in several places and let it dry for a couple days.

The "repair" is not very strong compared to the original. Cross pinning is what you need. Drill several holes along the length of the crack. If you can drill from under the barrel or from inside the stock without penetrating the outside surface, it would be great. Pins can be little hardwood dowels, or stainless. I like to cut off screws because they have the threads. Into the hole use wood epoxy. A friend you has guns that cost a couple years' wages for me says to use Acraglass bedding compound.

Try to avoid getting glues on the outside of the gun. Keep a clean rag handy for clean up.
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Old 09-04-2019, 6:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyIron View Post
If the crack is clean and can be pushed back together for a perfect fit:

Use some wood glue, and push it all the way down into the crack with a thin needle. Take your time and get the glue ALL the way in. Now flex the crack open and closed to suck more of the glue into the crack. Then clamp it in several places and let it dry for a couple days.

The "repair" is not very strong compared to the original. Cross pinning is what you need. Drill several holes along the length of the crack. If you can drill from under the barrel or from inside the stock without penetrating the outside surface, it would be great. Pins can be little hardwood dowels, or stainless. I like to cut off screws because they have the threads. Into the hole use wood epoxy. A friend you has guns that cost a couple years' wages for me says to use Acraglass bedding compound.

Try to avoid getting glues on the outside of the gun. Keep a clean rag handy for clean up.
OMG really! A five inch long crack will glue up nicely and the glued area will actually be stronger than the original wood.

Once you start drilling holes then the strength of the wood grain is lost and you have shortened the grain run at each hole.

I've seen what happens when dowels are improperly used on wood.

irh
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  #18  
Old 09-05-2019, 4:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironhorse1 View Post
OMG really! A five inch long crack will glue up nicely and the glued area will actually be stronger than the original wood.
Despite your condescending tone, you still appear to be a strutting keyboard jockey. You haven't seen the damage, so you have no clue, but you still shoot off your mouth like a prepubescent schoolboy. You can do what whatever you want. It makes no difference to me. And the original poster can use the knowledge he gains here to evaluate his gun and make the best choice to resolve the problem.

Last edited by RustyIron; 09-05-2019 at 4:09 AM..
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  #19  
Old 09-05-2019, 5:54 AM
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Brass pins used with glue were the standard armory repair for cracked stocks on 1903's, Garands, and M14's. I don't know why ironhorse1 keeps talking about wood dowels and broken chair legs....I do agree that modern glues are stronger than wood, but that depends on full penetration of the surfaces involved and ensuring they are clean and oil-free. On a milsurp rifle that may not be the case.
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Old 09-05-2019, 8:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironhorse1 View Post
Wood or brass it still requires drilling a hole. I have repaired 100's of wood items and will not cross pin unless I can do a blind dowel that is not seen.

What I have seen on wood table legs as a good example is when they have been drilled and crack again the wood shatters.

Now a new piece has to be sectioned into the broken area as there are now too many breaks to glue or pin. In the worse cases a new leg had to be cut and shaped.

Some areas can have wood screws installed which needs a lot smaller hole
However I would not do this in the wrist area.

irh
wooden table legs are not subject to recoil.

And Sorry I'll just leave it at that. I've fixed a lot of wood stocks. I've only fixed one chair and one table.
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Old 09-27-2019, 2:22 PM
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Without pics to help these teased are lessened..
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Old 09-27-2019, 4:54 PM
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Everyone knows the best way and everyone else is an idiot.

Until you know what type of stock it is and where the crack is, and what stresses it's exposed to, there is no correct answer.
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