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Blades, Bows and Tools Discussion of non-firearm weapons and camping/survival tools.

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  #1  
Old 09-13-2019, 9:35 AM
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BigFatGuy BigFatGuy is offline
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Default Lighting Setup for outdoor night-time archery practice?

I've proven, this week, I'm not going to be able to wake up early to practice with my bow before work. That means I'll have to do it after dinner, before bed... which means it'll be about 10pm.

When you practice under lights, with a "bare bow" recurve, where do you like the lights?

I figure, I need something on me so I can clearly see the string, arrow, etc... and something on the target... but since I'm basically working with garage-work-lights, I'm trying to figure something out where I won't be blinding myself...

Any advice?
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  #2  
Old 09-13-2019, 6:35 PM
sofbak sofbak is offline
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All you need is good lighting on the target-lights within 10' to 12' of target.

The tip of the arrow wull be silhouetted on the target when you draw and aim.

If (somehow) you are seeing the string when you draw, either you're looking in the wrong direction, or your technique/stance/posture is totally ****ed....
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  #3  
Old 09-14-2019, 6:17 AM
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I think he wants light at the firing line so he can set his arrow.
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Old 09-14-2019, 1:00 PM
sofbak sofbak is offline
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OK. Then there really is a legit use for these things:

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=led+nocks...l_4hrbitgr29_e
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  #5  
Old 09-15-2019, 11:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sofbak View Post
If (somehow) you are seeing the string when you draw, either you're looking in the wrong direction, or your technique/stance/posture is totally ****ed....
It's possible, but everything i've read about shooting a "bare bow" says aligning the "string blur" with the body of the bow is important
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Old 09-15-2019, 11:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sofbak View Post
OK. Then there really is a legit use for these things:
I kind of want those, just because they look freaking cool in flight... :-)
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Old 09-16-2019, 10:14 AM
sofbak sofbak is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigFatGuy View Post
It's possible, but everything i've read about shooting a "bare bow" says aligning the "string blur" with the body of the bow is important
When I took up a recurve, I read a few things about posture/aiming/shooting, but I never read anything about "aligning string blur and bow body. I don't see how this is possible or practical.

Most archers anchor their release hand somewhere on the side of their face-on the cheek below the eye, on the chin below the corner of their mouth, or (in my practice) on the corner of the jaw below the ear lobe. I don't see how a normally configured human could even see the string from any of these release anchor positions.

And I don't see any practical purpose in aligning the string blur with the bow body even if I could see it. Your primary focus should be on the tip of your drawn arrow, and secondary focus on the blurry target point you are aiming at-just like the principle of "front sight focus" for open-sighted firearms. I don't see what benefit there is to align the string with the bow. Once you resolve the difference between point of aim and point of impact, you adjust your point of aim (primary focus) to the appropriate spot on the blurry target.
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Old 09-16-2019, 12:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sofbak View Post
I don't see how a normally configured human could even see the string from any of these release anchor positions.
Ever use "pins" on a bow? There's a little tiny "ghost ring" embedded in the string to serve as the rear sight. Same basic idea, but without the ring.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sofbak View Post
And I don't see any practical purpose in aligning the string blur with the bow body even if I could see it.
Left-right alignment. If your head isn't in the exact same position, it will move your eye, thus your front arm.

My employer's web filters don't let me pre-read these pages to suggest one as better than another, but if you google

bare bow archery "string blur"

you should see plenty of what I've read, as discussed by people better than I with a bow.
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