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Survival and Preparations Long and short term survival and 'prepping'.

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  #41  
Old 10-17-2020, 6:33 PM
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Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
You know nothing about storing food long term. Most of the rice you buy in a bag is at least 2 years old. Do you even store food long term or just read about it on Google. My family has been storing food and using it for several decades.
Since you apparently have been doing this for a long time, how do YOU store rice, and the like?

What methods of preservation do you deploy?

O2 absorbers? Vacuum seal? Other?

I am curious regarding someone who has been doing this for a while...
We both mentioned the 1-year guy talking out his backside.
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  #42  
Old 10-17-2020, 7:47 PM
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We have several ways for long term storage. We have our own canning machine and use #10 cans with 02 absorbers. All our dry goods are heated before canning and stored at about 68 degrees.

We have several 4 x 4 steel bins for storing stuff also. Again heated and then vacuum applied. We use a fork lift to move them.

We use 1/2 gallon jars to store tons of stuff in also. When opening a large container, its broken down into jars.

Salt in jars, sugar in cans.

There isn't much you can't store in # 10 cans.

Spices are vacuum packed in 1 quart jars.

We are always looking for #10 canned goods from Hash to cheese sauce to pork and beans and the like. Our Larder is designed around the # 10 can.

Seeds are dried and stored in # 10 cans. Some need to be frozen to help with long term viability.

Dry goods are easy to store, canned fruits are a bit of a problem, some canners cut corners and cause problems. We have seen our fair share of swollen and ruptured cans. Such is storing food.

We raise and process our own livestock. We even have a small bird processor for fowl. I bought it from a game farm. Chicken is much better tasting when you raise your own.

We waste next to nothing.
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  #43  
Old 10-17-2020, 8:23 PM
Nvberinger Nvberinger is offline
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Originally Posted by edgerly779 View Post
250 calories is nothing. Cannot survive on that. Are you sure about those numbers I thought an mre was 2k plus.
500 to 750 cal a day is about right and smart. When SHTF your going to stay indoors, unwilling unable to go out . Your not gonna be hiking 20 miles will full back back.
Food, water, energy, ammo conservation will be top of your list.
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  #44  
Old 10-18-2020, 7:05 PM
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Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
Freeze dried stuff still has to be cooked in water. Rice and beans have no shelf life. It stores forever. Its real food.
And they both need to be cooked in water to be used, right?
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  #45  
Old 10-18-2020, 8:12 PM
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Rice and beans need to be cooked. Pretty sure they want you to cook the freeze dried stuff also.
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  #46  
Old 10-18-2020, 9:17 PM
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Originally Posted by NorCalRefuge View Post
I know this is survival stuff, and during a SHTF situation you probably wouldn't really care, but...

Anyone actually eaten this stuff? Is it any good? How many actual meals does one can make? The servings per container seem to be only 250 calories, so that seems to come out to around a full can per day for a ~2000 calorie diet.
Mountain house is tasty for food that can be stored for 30 years and retain its flavor and nutrition. Its also light weight because the moisture is removed, and easy to prepare.

Yeah, you need to augment with rice, beans, canned food, and animal fats. Tallow (beef fat) to give you extra calories and amino acids. Cheese which can be frozen, dry sausage which can be frozen or kept in fridge. Dry rice and beans can be stored in food grade bags and buckets with the oxygen removed, for years and years. You wouldn't want to eat mountain house for every meal unless you had to.

You need fat in your diet, remember, its about calories. And stress burns calories along with the extra activity.

When food is in short supply, high calorie foods are king. Forget about eating super healthy, worry about having enough calories to keep you going.

To have food for emergencies, I have three levels of food.

1. Fresh, frozen and pantry food. I try to keep the freezer full these days, and we keep soups and sauces, pasta, etc. Pantry food. We would tend to eat this first.

2. Then canned goods, put away for emergencies. Canned meats, tuna fish, chili beans with meat, etc. You can mix with dry rice, beans and pasta. The nice thing about canned foods is that most of the time the food is already cooked. Canned food will last years beyond its use date, unless the can is damaged.

3. I keep Mountain House as light weight, last resort, food. To be augmented with beans and rice. You can also buy Mountain House cans with just dried diced chicken, beef, or hamburger (expensive) that you can add to rice and beans. I buy MH when on sale by the case, or a few cans at a time.

Last edited by ScottsBad; 10-19-2020 at 10:46 AM..
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  #47  
Old 10-19-2020, 6:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
Rice and beans need to be cooked. Pretty sure they want you to cook the freeze dried stuff also.
MH freeze dried foods are already cooked. Hot water speeds up reconstitution times and people usually prefer hot meals, but as I mentioned previously they can be rehydrated and eaten with cold water.

KevinB it's clear you are very dogmatic about rice and beans and distain the layered approach ScottsBad, myself and others advocate. Fine. Let's agree to disagree and leave it at that.
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  #48  
Old 10-19-2020, 9:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Gun Kraft View Post
MH freeze dried foods are already cooked. Hot water speeds up reconstitution times and people usually prefer hot meals, but as I mentioned previously they can be rehydrated and eaten with cold water.

KevinB it's clear you are very dogmatic about rice and beans and distain the layered approach ScottsBad, myself and others advocate. Fine. Let's agree to disagree and leave it at that.
A multilayered approach is what everyone should be using. It is clearly not all about rice and beans. People need to be storing a balanced diverse diet with all types of food. This is what my family does. No matter what happens my family will never go hungry and cold.

Here is a link to a good food need calculator.
https://providentliving.com/prepared...rage/foodcalc/
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  #49  
Old 10-19-2020, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
Rice and beans need to be cooked. Pretty sure they want you to cook the freeze dried stuff also.
Boiling water, mixed in a bag or pot for a few minutes. The food is precooked all you are doing is resupplying the moisture.

Last edited by ScottsBad; 10-19-2020 at 10:47 AM..
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  #50  
Old 10-19-2020, 11:23 AM
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Doing your own canning is great, but for me, I just buy canned foods and rotate them out, and buy more food. I don't have time to do canning. BTW if you want your canned food to last a long time, buy bland canned foods. The spicy, low or high PH foods do deteriorate the cans more quickly.

We had a can of pineapple, bought by someone else in my family and hidden at the back of a shelf. It went bad when the can corroded through. IT TOOK more than SEVEN YEARS, but it did happen.

If I'd known the pineapple can was there I would have thrown it out after a couple years, just because of the extreme PH.

Most food will last a LONG time.

I use vacuum bags a lot, mostly for frozen food. And I rotate those of course. Vacuum bags work great for spices. Smaller portions of rice, etc.

I read that before you seal up rice, its a good idea to put the rice in a freezer for two or three days to kill whatever kinds of creatures live in the rice. Since every dry food is allowed to have a certain level of bugs in it, this might let your rice last even longer.

I never buy canned vegetables (there are vegetables in the soups and stuff) for emergency food, because canned vegetables are VERY low in calories and take up shelf space, because they are mostly water.

We buy big jars of vitamins to help make up any missing elements.

We keep many jars of nuts and rotate those.

I wish I had my own freeze dryer.
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  #51  
Old 10-19-2020, 8:01 PM
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Question on the rice storage. Are you guys cooking it and then freezing it to re-use later or are you freezing it to kill bugs and then storing it back on the shelf to cook for the first time at a later date? Would the few days of sitting in the freezer and then thawing out back on the shelf lead to any mold issues due to the moisture in there? Thanks in advance.
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  #52  
Old 10-19-2020, 8:18 PM
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We heat the rice before storing to kill all the bugs in it and make sure it has as little moisture as possible. Same thing with all grains, flours and beans.

Some people use freezing for the same thing but it doesn't help with the moisture.
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  #53  
Old 10-19-2020, 8:23 PM
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They can't possibly be proposing 250 calories as a stand-alone meal for actual adults.

This is where a lot of preppers go wrong, they take the "makes umpteen meals!" stuff at face value. When in actuality you'll be going away hungry if that's all you have.

That 250 calorie chicken/rice serving is great if you have it alongside a serving of mashed potatoes, a heap of steamed broccoli and a slab of cheesecake for dessert.

Otherwise 250 calories is a condiment, not an entree.
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  #54  
Old 10-19-2020, 9:31 PM
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If you seal rice in mylar bags with oxygen absorbers, no prefreezing or preheating is necessary to kill.bugs or remove moisture. The nearly zero oxygen environment kills eggs and larvae over a few days max. The oxygen absorbers also reduce/eliminate moisture.
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  #55  
Old 10-20-2020, 12:54 AM
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Folks, don't stress out about the 'Serving Size' on the Mountain House label. It is just a mean-of-measurement to fit in a 'Serving Cup.' It does not mean folks should eat just one serving per meal.

For example, a pouch of Mountain House Rice & Chicken (Entree) has '3 Servings.' (Shown at the front of the pouch.)



.

Last edited by axhoaxho; 10-23-2020 at 2:07 AM..
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  #56  
Old 10-20-2020, 1:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
We heat the rice before storing to kill all the bugs in it and make sure it has as little moisture as possible. Same thing with all grains, flours and beans.

Some people use freezing for the same thing but it doesn't help with the moisture.
What do you guys do for the heating process? Wife has been putting the rice cooker to good use. I suggested we cook portions of rice and freeze them. Then we could take them out of the freezer to either re-heat or boil in the bag. Or the other option would be to portion it out and store on the racks in the garage with all the other food supplies.
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  #57  
Old 10-20-2020, 3:35 AM
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Originally Posted by madland View Post
What do you guys do for the heating process? Wife has been putting the rice cooker to good use. I suggested we cook portions of rice and freeze them. Then we could take them out of the freezer to either re-heat or boil in the bag. Or the other option would be to portion it out and store on the racks in the garage with all the other food supplies.
There's a process called "oven canning", or "dry canning". Put the canning jar with the dry material in it, in this case rice, put it in the oven at 200* for about 1 hr. Take it out, put the sterilized lid on, and tighten.
Heat kills the bugs, and creates a small vacuum when everything cools.


https://www.budget101.com/recipes/39...-oven-canning/

Wash and dry Jars, be sure the rims are free of cracks and nicks
Heat oven to 200F
Fill jars using a canning funnel leaving 1/2″ of headspace and place them on a large cookie sheet
Once all the jars are filled, put them in the oven and “Process” for at least 60 minutes
Remove the jars from the oven, Wipe the rim of the jar, place a lid on and screw the band down tight
When the lids “Ping” they are said to be sealed.
Cool in a draft-free spot

Last edited by Sailormilan2; 10-20-2020 at 3:37 AM..
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  #58  
Old 10-20-2020, 4:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCalRefuge View Post
I know this is survival stuff, and during a SHTF situation you probably wouldn't really care, but...

Anyone actually eaten this stuff? Is it any good? How many actual meals does one can make? The servings per container seem to be only 250 calories, so that seems to come out to around a full can per day for a ~2000 calorie diet.
Mountain House has 'Rice & Chicken' & Chicken & Rice'. I've had both, loved one & didn't like the other at all. Sorry but I don't remember which one I liked (plus we all have different taste buds) & I'm not by my main stash to go look. But my suggestion is before anyone stocks up on #10 cans is to try the pouches to see what you like/don't like. I bought a couple of each of the small pouches & then the ones I liked I bought more & the ones I didn't like I didn't buy more. You don't want to be stuck in a survival situation with a bunch of #10 cans of MRE's you don't like... In my opinion some are excellent & some I wouldn't eat again...
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  #59  
Old 10-20-2020, 7:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madland View Post
What do you guys do for the heating process? Wife has been putting the rice cooker to good use. I suggested we cook portions of rice and freeze them. Then we could take them out of the freezer to either re-heat or boil in the bag. Or the other option would be to portion it out and store on the racks in the garage with all the other food supplies.
At the ranch we have a very large commercial kitchen. It has a very large oven that was used to cook bread in. We use it for everything. The Kitchen is huge and is used all the time from the ladies from the Ward. The dishwasher holds 72 1/2 gallons jars. Drains in the concrete floors and the walls are stainless steel. 1 inch piping for cold and hot water.

About 25 years ago the county up here got real strict about feeding people and non commercial kitchens. I built her huge commercial kitchen with all the bells and whistles. Processing meat and such is not a issue. When they are canning it is a sight to see.

I don't think I have ever seen my wife buy sugar in less than a 50lb sack. I'm blessed to have her as my wife.
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  #60  
Old 10-20-2020, 8:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWL View Post
Mountain House food is more typically considered backpacking food and is actually pretty good. It is cooked food that is freeze-dried, which retains taste & flavor vs. the typical dried foods that Wise or Augusan sells -and which tastes like crap.

I like it better than MREs.

I suggest you eat it as a meal component, not as 100% of your daily caloric intake.
Agree 100%. Remember, hunger is the greatest condiment of all!
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  #61  
Old 10-23-2020, 12:54 AM
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Thanks for the insight guys.
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  #62  
Old 10-23-2020, 1:04 AM
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Never canned dry goods. Good info from sailorman.
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  #63  
Old 10-24-2020, 5:39 AM
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There are few MREs I don't like, but I bias toward the HAM-Slice/Ham Omelet was it(?) MRE generation of the darker bag varieties that used to exist. The hippie-variants of VEGAN tortellini are for the birds...
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  #64  
Old 10-24-2020, 5:47 AM
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MREs have huge calorie numbers and there’s only one (the omelette) that I would not consume because it would induce vomiting. A single winter MRE could keep me alive for close to a week. They do however require large amounts of water to facilitate defecation. Water is so much more important than food. You can make it 30 days without food but you ain’t gonna go much more than three without water.
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