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Survival and Preparations Long and short term survival and 'prepping'.

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  #1  
Old 10-20-2018, 9:57 PM
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Default Gear you've tested, experience good/bad

I've done lots of day hikes, really enjoy it and the outdoors. Early summer I changed my kit for overnights, and recently working towards a 3 day+ pack.
The change to overnight was pretty straightforward, second day+ is a bigger leap for me.

Currently testing gear to refine my kit, latest is a new pack, Mystery Ranch Ravine 50L.
Took it out last Friday but it was getting pretty uncomfortable after a few hours. Weighed around 35lbs, maybe isn't fit right, need to play around with it more.

Pros so far:
Layout with good compartments.
Build quality and materials are great.

Cons:
50L bit tough packing all the things, gotta do the tetris and remember how I got it packed.
Shoulder straps/hipbelt were wearing on me, maybe fitment issue.


Also tried ferro rod on a handful pile of dried oak wood shavings, couldn't light a fire, need more training.


What gear have you used for multi-day packs? Experiences good/bad appreciated, still learning here.
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Last edited by AreWeFree; 10-22-2018 at 7:40 PM..
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  #2  
Old 10-21-2018, 9:37 AM
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Your intended use?

I have heard that Mystery Ranch gear is pretty good. Well made and not ChiCom crapola.

I have an old Eberlestock that has been a great gp pack for hunting/riding dirt bikes etc... Doesn't hold the kitchen sink, but over the years I've learned to be a minimalist in every conceivable way with regard to what I carry.

I like the built in rifle scabbard. Nothing like stowing the rifle out of the way when I'm picking my way through tight brush that I'm too lazy to walk around. I do make exceptions to Manzanita tho. The scabbard will work for fishing poles too.
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  #3  
Old 10-21-2018, 7:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AreWeFree View Post
Also tried ferro rod on a handful pile of dried oak wood shavings, couldn't light a fire, need more training.
It may be your tinder...how thin were they? Need to be almost paper thin to take from sparks and really dry. I like to scrape the inner wood with the (90 degree) spine of my knife to get super fine shavings. However, around me the go to tinder for ferro-rods is processed tulip poplar bark.
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Old 10-21-2018, 7:53 PM
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Originally Posted by TheChief View Post
It may be your tinder...how thin were they? Need to be almost paper thin to take from sparks and really dry. I like to scrape the inner wood with the (90 degree) spine of my knife to get super fine shavings. However, around me the go to tinder for ferro-rods is processed tulip poplar bark.
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  #5  
Old 10-23-2018, 8:41 AM
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This is a survival/prep section but you're talking hiking/camping so I'll toss in my .02

I hike and backpack regularly and I find that my 38L Osprey (really only 36L) works great for a weekend hike.

It's not the lightest at over 2lbs, but it's comfortable enough to make up for the extra weight.

The bottom has a divider so you can stuff/remove your sleeping bag without disturbing anything else.

The mouth opens wide enough to stuff and organize your tent poles, rain fly, stove/fuel, etc.

The brain has a top flap and one underneath; items I don't need to access right away such as first aid and toiletries go there while my ready to access stuff goes in the outer pocket.

Last but not least, between the pack and internal frame, there's a slot for a hydration pack. It's convenient to have because when I backpack alone, it could be a little awkward trying to reach for my bottle while it sits in one of the outer sleeves.

Oh and I forgot to mention, my pack comes with a rain cover (stowed away at the bottom) as well as an outer mesh pocket in case I need to stow something outside the pack to dry.

In my opinion, 50L is a bit much especially for 2-3 days. I'm a minimalist and even then I still think I'm packing a bit much. Base weight is around 15lbs or so, been awhile since it's been weighed.
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my gun shoots better with shiny brass...plus not only does the shiny brass make me look like a pimp at the range if the sun catches it just right it blinds the guy next to me which improves my odds of winning the match.

Last edited by Kwikvette; 10-23-2018 at 8:44 AM..
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  #6  
Old 10-23-2018, 8:47 AM
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Here are some old pictures; aside from adding a few sleeping bags so I'm covered every season, things remain unchanged.

If I know I'm going to be in wet weather, I'll line the inside of my bag with a garbage bag.







Love my Osprey and this is my third one over the years.
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my gun shoots better with shiny brass...plus not only does the shiny brass make me look like a pimp at the range if the sun catches it just right it blinds the guy next to me which improves my odds of winning the match.
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  #7  
Old 10-23-2018, 8:57 AM
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The best gear I've always bought has been reviewed by Nutnfancy.
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  #8  
Old 10-24-2018, 2:24 AM
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Blue tarps.

It ainít the prettiest thing in the world, but when SHTF there are many surprising uses of these tarps.

I always keep a few large-size ones around (can be cut into smaller sizes) in the garage and in the truck. They are cheap, and easy to find at any hardware store.

Quote:
1. Tarps are obviously an easy choice for making shelters. A single tarp can be used to create an A-frame shelter, a teepee, or a lean-to.

2. A tarp can be used to cover a broken window or hole in a wall caused by a natural disaster or explosion. The tarp can help keep the weather out and allow you to keep your house warm.

3. In a wilderness survival situation, you can use a tarp as a ground cover. Depending on how many people need to be covered, you could fold the tarp in half or several times to create a thicker barrier.

4. Wrapping a tarp around you can help keep you dry in rain or snow. Depending on the size of the tarp, you may be able to cut it in half to protect two people.

5. A tarp can be used to create a shelter for livestock. Most animals will be okay in extreme weather if they can just get out of the rain.

6. Cutting a tarp into strips and braiding together is a great way to make durable cordage.

7. Digging a shallow hole and placing the tarp inside is a great way to catch rainwater. The tarp will act as a liner to keep out the dirt.

8. Roof damage caused by a storm or some other event can be temporarily fixed by covering it with a tarp.

9. A tarp folded in two can be hung from two trees to create a hammock. It is always better to sleep off the ground given the opportunity.

10. Use a tarp to cover firewood. If you donít have a shed to store your wood in, you will need to do what you can to keep it dry.

11. An RV is an ideal bug out vehicle for a pepper. RVs are prone to leak. Cover the roof with a tarp to help prevent water damage.

12. Laying a brightly colored tarp flat on the ground is a way to signal for help if you need it.

13. A tarp can be used as a makeshift stretcher. Fold it in half to give it more strength.

14. A tarp can also be used in a hunting situation. A large animal is too heavy to drag back to your home or camp, but you can roll it onto a tarp and drag it with a little effort.

15. Use the tarp to give you some privacy when taking care of personal business, like showering or bathing.

16. Hang the tarp around your latrine to create an open-air outhouse that will give you privacy if you are in a camp situation.

17. If you have a raft, a tarp could be strung up and used as a sail. A small boat or even a disabled motor boat could be made useful again with a sail made from a tarp.

18. A tarp can be used to protect young plants in your survival garden. Make a hoop by using small sticks stuck in the ground along the row. Drape the tarp over the sticks and use rocks to hold it down. The tarp will protect the plants from a cold snap.

19. A tarp can make an excellent camouflage tool. Cover your vehicle or supplies with a tarp and then toss some branches, leaves and other debris to disguise it.

20. Create a blind of sorts. You will want to use a tarp that is the same color as the environment. If you have the ability to glue sticks or leaves onto the tarp, it will help it blend in more. The blind can be used for hunting or to hide from bad guys.

21. A tarp can be used as an emergency blanket. The plastic will help trap in body heat to keep a person from developing hypothermia.

22. Use a tarp to drag the harvest you get from your garden back to your camp.

23. Use a tarp to create a sack to carry goods you have managed to scavenge, or use it to carry your own supplies if you are down a backpack.

24. You can create an effective trap with the help of a tarp. Dig a hole big enough to trap whatever animal or human you hope to capture. Cover the hole with a tarp and cover with various debris so it will all blend in.

25. Use the tarp to create a solar still in a desert situation or a situation where you need to desalinate saltwater.

When you are shopping for tarps to add to your supplies, choose quality tarps in colors that are more likely to blend in to your surroundings. Green or brown tarps are preferable to the bright blue tarps in a survival situation where you want to conceal your presence.

https://urbansurvivalsite.com/uses-tarps-emergency/
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  #9  
Old 10-24-2018, 2:42 AM
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Jetboil.

A tried-and-true cooking system by campers, emergency crews, cross country truckers, etc. I have been using one at site too.

It is so small that can be packed into a tumbler size, yet it does fire up every time even when cold and windy. Can boil the water inside its tumbler, in a minute or two.

Pair it with Mountain House meals, it can provide hot tasty meals for days.



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  #10  
Old 10-24-2018, 12:37 PM
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+1 on tarps

My friend has a Jetboil but believe it or not he doesn't take it backpacking as he's had issues with the igniter; so much for a reliable stove.

I personally use an MSR Pocket Rocket; for light weight and reliability, it beats out the Jetboil by a margin.
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Originally Posted by longrange1 View Post
my gun shoots better with shiny brass...plus not only does the shiny brass make me look like a pimp at the range if the sun catches it just right it blinds the guy next to me which improves my odds of winning the match.
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  #11  
Old 10-31-2018, 11:46 AM
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items that have never failed me on camping trips are:

-my TTW from Brian Goode (larger fixed blade knife)
-EXOTAC fire starter
-Danner boots and FITS wool socks

I've tried numerous backpacks, including Osprey, and have yet to find the perfect one. I've used my fixed blade knife for cutting away downed smaller trees on trails, making tinder, and cleaning game. I'm on my third pair of Danners over the years, and do not go hunting or camping without them.

Jerry
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  #12  
Old 10-31-2018, 3:07 PM
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+1 for jet boil...seen a few people who use it and impressed...will get one...very fast, light, compact and reliable. Fit in an overnight pack very easily.
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Old 11-21-2018, 6:58 AM
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https://www.honeywellsafety.com/Prod...aspx?site=/usa

12 years wearing it 8 hrs a day during the week. Hands down most comfortable, washable respirator Ive ever used.
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  #14  
Old 11-21-2018, 7:11 AM
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My three day pack kind of crosses over to military style, it is the Spec-Ops Brand T.H.E. Pack and if you wait for a sale you can get them for about $130, sometimes a bit less. I had one of their "Ultimate" versions, it was just too much for me, too heavy duty if that's possible. The standard is a fantastic pack and guaranteed for life. Made in the USA, I always do my best to by stuff made by out brothers and sisters at home.

https://specops.us/packs-bags.html

There are a lot of belts and buckles to adjust on it, but after about a half hour of customizing it's good to go. I've carried it all day without any hot/sore spots to speak of. It's not a framed pack so you need to pack it right, but it's quality that will last a lifetime and they back it up.
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Old 11-21-2018, 8:47 AM
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I picked up a Mystery Ranch Scree pack a few months ago; once I worked out how to adjust the length of the back it functions very nicely.

Never owned a jet boil; nice but seems a bit flimsy. Am more of a MSR International stove guy.
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