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  #1  
Old 10-12-2020, 8:57 PM
Geofois Geofois is offline
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Default Cracked 1903A3 stock =(

Is this something that can be fixed by an amateur with great wood glue or will it require a plug or bolt going from side to side? Is there glue that is thin enough to let it ooze through the crack then I can vice it for days?

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  #2  
Old 10-12-2020, 10:42 PM
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That one looks nasty. You might ask a mod to move this to the C&R subforum.

Paging TRAP55!!
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Old 10-12-2020, 10:53 PM
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Yeah maybe it's better there. Sarco has some for sale for $125 and $149 for select grade so my brother might just grab one. I have some nice wood glue so I can give that a shot but it's in a bad spot as you can see. He just bought it also. I don't know how me missed the giant crack.
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  #4  
Old 10-13-2020, 12:25 AM
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Iíve got a 1903a3 with the same problem. Itís not uncommon. I bought an acriglass kit from Brownells but havenít done it yet. You should also pin it and relieve the wood just behind the receiver so it doesnít crack again. Thereís some examples online if you look around.
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Old 10-13-2020, 12:41 AM
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that crack/deficit appears more profound than some than some of the nice repaired examples i've seen posted in the past. certainly not saying it couldn't be fixed. i think these are the types of pins generally used to repair these defects: https://www.brownells.com/aspx/searc...l.aspx?pid=617

I also seem to recall reading that the CMP Custom Shop works on the 1903 rifles....you might try giving them a call as well.
Stock Doc lists stock repair as well: https://stockdocusa.com/shop/ols/pro...repair-service

hope it works out well for you.

Last edited by mtenenhaus; 10-13-2020 at 12:54 AM..
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Old 10-13-2020, 1:13 AM
Geofois Geofois is offline
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Thanks Ora Serrata and mtenenhaus. I did watch a video with the midway guy using the pins into drilled holes. My brother isn't that handy but I wonder if I can use my wood glue and then recess one side and put a nice thick wood screw into one side. Maybe smooth out one side so the screw just bites into one and pulls it to the screw head on other side. I probably can't put too much stress or it will form cracks from the head of the screw. The bigger the head the more secure. Knowing my brother he'll just buy a stock for $150 but I'd give that a shot and see.
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Old 10-13-2020, 7:43 PM
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If your doing this as an experiment and not looking for correct go for it what’s it going to hurt? Otherwise just get a new stock. You can get a new reproduction stock and hand guard for less then $300 and used military stock for less then that.
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Old 10-13-2020, 7:49 PM
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My brother just ordered a used military stock so I'll take it and experiment myself. I'm buying a 1903A3 barreled action so might be a good project.
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Old 10-15-2020, 10:32 AM
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that can be fixed, at least it's not fiberglass. i am still trying to figure out if i should repair mine.
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Old 10-15-2020, 10:53 AM
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From what I've read you've got to be careful that the rear tang of the receiver isn't butted right up to the stock. People have dremeled out a little wood to prevent it. My first 03A3 split the stock the first time I took it out. I bought a good military stock as a replacement. Then I bought a sporterized 03a3 for a good price that wasn't cut at all. The cracked stock is going on that one, but I haven't glued it yet.
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Old 10-15-2020, 1:39 PM
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I better check my brothers stock. It knocked out a V shaped piece of wood so probably solved the problem by doing that =/ but I bet I need to trim some more material. I want to put some glue in the crack and and vice it for days but I also want to put a couple wood screws keeping the sides snugged. My question it about capping the top of the screw so it doesn't look like frankenstein. That will go on my weekly shooter.
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Old 10-25-2020, 11:24 AM
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Default Updated pics

Hey guys,

My brother swapped out stocks so I'm looking to fix his old stock. Here are a 2 pics where you can see there are a couple points inside the stock that are cracked. Is this stock savable? I was thinking I need to put some glue into the butt stock tang area then vice it together, then drill a couple guide holes and put 2 screws from the side in a lateral position so one over the other, then 1 screw for each cracked block to hold those together. I can probably drop some glue into the screw hole also if that helps.

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  #13  
Old 10-26-2020, 8:50 AM
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Why don't you just buy a new one instead of mickey mouse..
https://www.sarcoinc.com/springfield...unstained-new/
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  #14  
Old 10-26-2020, 10:45 AM
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My brother did buy a nice one from Sarco. Ideally if one can find a used GI one that would be the best. I try to avoid buying the mickey mouse ones =P. Not sure if you realize but there are many stocks that do get repaired and if they can be repaired that is the best thing vs tossing actual used GI stocks that came with the rifle in the trash. Professionals actually use threaded brass pins but maybe that's only at Disneyland hehe. The youtube below is probably what I'll need to do but I do have a mickey mouse hat so I'll be able to do it right. Sorry I'm jk. Just wasn't sure how repairing a stock is considered Mickey Mouse. Any old rifle enthusiast would try to repair before throwing away. I was gonna say the most mickey mouse thing to do would be put a new stock on and realized that's what you were saying to do =/. If converting a sporter rifle then I imagine that's ok but if you have a GI rifle and can find a used GI stock go that route. For $150 on Sarco they had what appeared to be unissed GI stocks in dark walnut. I would try to avoid a new stock as much as possible. That's way more mickey mouse that repairing a WWII stock that has cartouches and some history.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3YA8bqiz4A

Last edited by Geofois; 10-26-2020 at 11:38 AM..
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Old 10-27-2020, 8:15 AM
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To each his own..
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  #16  
Old 10-27-2020, 12:48 PM
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I'd spread the crack a little and then inject a quality wood glue all the way in. Then clamp it securely, wipe off any excess, and let it cure. Worth a try.
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Old 10-27-2020, 1:27 PM
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Yeah I think I'll do that as much as I can. I will hold the stock muzzle end up and use some painters tape to create a reservoir right where the stock crack starts and pump the crack(that's what she said) causing some hydraulic action that should pull the glue deeper into the crack. Someone also said make some water hot and put the glue bottle in it which should help it run better.
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Old 10-27-2020, 5:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geofois View Post
Yeah I think I'll do that as much as I can. I will hold the stock muzzle end up and use some painters tape to create a reservoir right where the stock crack starts and pump the crack(that's what she said) causing some hydraulic action that should pull the glue deeper into the crack. Someone also said make some water hot and put the glue bottle in it which should help it run better.
Speaking as someone who has used literally thousands of gallons of top quality wood glue professionally. In the largest residential cabinet shop west of the Mississippi. I would suggest against its use for this application. 30 plus yrs in "Cabinet Makers and Millmen Union". And have also done at least a dozen DIY similar stock repairs.

This is a "straight pull away" along the joint crack. Even the best pro wood glues aren't well suited to that type of bond.

I suggest you FIRST clamp the stock using multiple C-clamps and padding to protect from marring. I like old leather shoe tongues, or other leather scraps for this on stocks. THEN look and see if the joint is tight along its length. If so, no coloring is needed.

Use a clear 2 part epoxy. NOT the 5 min crap. Use the 30 plus minute cure time products. This allows it to soak into the wood fibers, and give a good complete bond before it "Cooks Off". If their are small gaps, Use some 60 or 80 grit garnet sand paper to sand the stock in the barrel channel and create some "Dust" that matches the stock color. And mix the dust with the epoxy as you mix it.

I use syringes and hypodermic needles of appropriate size to inject the epoxy deep into the crack before clamping.

AFTER leaving it clamped for several days. COOK OFF time and CURE TIME are different. I suggest you install cross bolts inside the action recess. 1 behind the mag well. 1 behind the trigger. And one behind the tang screw. I use any matl. brass, stainless, or steel 10/32 machine screws cut to length for these. Just get ones long enough to be threaded full length of the cross bolt.

Use a dremel, chisel, or exacto knife to make a trough across the stock in the 3 needed locations. Place epoxy in the trough, push the cross bolt into it until below surface. Then cover the bolt up to flush with more epoxy.

If careful, you can do the cross bolts at same time as crack repair.

This "epoxy repair" with cross bolts makes the stock stronger than it was originally. And there are no fugly pins showing externally.

Considering how sloppy the inletting is. This would be a perfect opportunity to give a go at Epoxy Bedding the action. But that's a story for another time.
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Old 10-27-2020, 5:45 PM
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Thanks Pacrat, that some great ideas. I am for sure going to use 3 brass pins for those exact locations. I wish I was as good of a wood worker. I put in the guide holes form the right side already but I'm save all the saw dust so I'll patch up with the same wood but I'm sure there will be 3 circles. If it was dark walnut they would be invisible but it's not.

For the rear stock bushing. It was loose before but I'm sure it won't be as loose. Should I put some type of putty or something to make it a snug fit? Maybe just wrap it with something until it's snug? I'm googling to see.
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Old 10-27-2020, 5:49 PM
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I had an M1 stock that cracked pretty bad some years ago. Knew a guy on the CSP forum, Rick Borecky, a.k.a. the "Stock Doc," and he looked at the pictures and said he could fix it. I'll see if I can find some pictures.

He did a fabulous job. Can't recall how much I paid now, but it was not expensive. He's still around:

I was very impressed with his work.
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Old 10-27-2020, 7:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geofois View Post
Thanks Pacrat, that some great ideas. I am for sure going to use 3 brass pins for those exact locations. I wish I was as good of a wood worker. I put in the guide holes form the right side already but I'm save all the saw dust so I'll patch up with the same wood but I'm sure there will be 3 circles. If it was dark walnut they would be invisible but it's not.

For the rear stock bushing. It was loose before but I'm sure it won't be as loose. Should I put some type of putty or something to make it a snug fit? Maybe just wrap it with something until it's snug? I'm googling to see.
Well Crap, now wished I would have chimed in sooner.

I most definitely urge not using the "pins" advertised by Brownells. Useless at best to stop any recurrence of the problem. They're just slick pins with no gripping surface. And useless for a "Straight pull application".

As to the loose guard screw bushing. I would remove it until the stock is repaired. Then take a bastard file to the OD and scuff the crap out of it. To create a good bond surface. ROUGHER THE BETTER. Then drill out the hole just slightly to a loose slip fit. And expose "FRESH WOOD" in the hole.
With no oil soaked fibers. Masking tape the bottom hole. Coat the bushing with epoxy. And shove it in from the top until flush. Leave it sit upright until set. DONE.

ETA............... "I wish I was as good of a wood worker". Using my method little actual skill is required. Making the mortises for the cross bolts. The rougher and crappier the mortise is. The better it works because of the roughness. And when done, nobody sees it once assembled.

Last edited by pacrat; 10-27-2020 at 7:16 PM..
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Old 10-27-2020, 8:24 PM
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My Marlin 60SS had stock crack before, just use any "wood clue" will fix the cracks, the importance thing is "clue must match the color of the stock". My stock is black&White so I used the clear supper clue , and couple cheap 5" C-clamps from Harbor Freight , after clue , clamp it for at least 48 hrs or more.







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Old 10-27-2020, 8:30 PM
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I would check out Mark Novak's videos on YouTube. He is an expert gunsmith and has several videos on stock repair. He use's Acraglass tinted black and sets a dogbone in the stock to hold them together.
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Old 10-28-2020, 10:55 PM
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Rick "Stock Doc" Borecky's work:





Still have this rifle, can't tell it was repaired. There was also a crack in the wrist area, IIRC, and he repaired that as well. Even after field-stripping this rifle, I don't think a casual inspection will allow one to notice the repairs. You have to know it was repaired.
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Old 10-28-2020, 11:20 PM
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Hey Pacrat, I didn't use the brownells pins so thank you for mentioning that. I didn't think they had gripping points either. I got the biggest brass wood screws with nice wood biting threads and covered them in glue.

The dogbone I bet would work. I wish I ran across that video. I would have only done 1 big brass screw through the wrist. I bet it will outlive me now so hopefully my patches will look ok. I'll post pics when finally done so everyone can throw tomatoes at me.

Spoke to Rick. His price quoted was actually very good. He said he couldn't guarantee the repair by the pics I sent him unless he did more drastic work. He talked about hiding a couple pins but wasn't sure it would hold. I'm thinking drastic meant what I did. Since my crack didn't open up I strained pretty hard to pull with both hands and could barely get it less than 1 mm open but just enough to pump some Titebond in by the wrist. I should have invested in syringes. After clamping it with the same clamps above I also put in 2 big brass wood screws coated in polyurethane glue and one smaller one for the thin wood block.

I'll take it to the range in a couple weeks before sealing up the brass screw heads that are recessed. I saw a video about making wood putty with the sawdust and titebond. I filed the screw head down to a third of the size it was but they were pretty big to start.

Last edited by Geofois; 10-28-2020 at 11:25 PM..
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Old 10-28-2020, 11:34 PM
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If I recall correctly I believe Rick Borecky wrote that he used dental floss to run Gorilla Glue into some cracks, maybe including the one on my cracked M1 stock. Not sure if that is his current MO, but when I found those pics and looked at them-- it's gotta be 15+ years since I last saw them-- I recall how pleased I was when I got that stock back. I was sure it was toast. It was my fault that it cracked, I had the rifle in a soft case muzzle down, leaning against a bench. Slid over and hit the ground. Good luck with your repair.
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Old 10-28-2020, 11:40 PM
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Thank you, yours looks great like it never happened. I'll try not to lean it on anything hearing how easy it is to break them against a hard surface. That would really suck. Everything would go slow motion as i say "nooooooooooo"
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Old 11-01-2020, 12:45 AM
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Second for Mark Novak on YT.
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Old 11-08-2020, 3:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geofois View Post
Thank you, yours looks great like it never happened. I'll try not to lean it on anything hearing how easy it is to break them against a hard surface. That would really suck. Everything would go slow motion as i say "nooooooooooo"
Pictures of the repair?
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Old 11-08-2020, 3:45 PM
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That stock has already been "repaired" once.
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Old 11-08-2020, 6:12 PM
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Quote:
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Pictures of the repair?
I'll take pics once I take it to the range to make sure my fix worked then I'll finish it.
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Old 11-08-2020, 6:23 PM
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My question is on oil.

Is the stock deeply penetrated with oil?

My guess is the crack has existed for decades and the biggest challenge is decreasing the wood so glue can correctly bond.

Larry with midway USA has some great videos on fixing cracks and hiding the repairs.

Surgical tubing makes for an excellent clamp.
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Old 11-08-2020, 6:32 PM
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I think you're right and unless I crack the stock open or soak it in a tub of something even then unless I open it enough the oil will be there. I went the hard core route with thick brass wood screws with glue on them and then wood glue into the cracks but didn't think the wood glue would do much without getting the oil out.
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