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  #1  
Old 05-17-2019, 11:23 AM
Dirtlaw Dirtlaw is offline
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Default A question regarding hunting ethics

What is the largest game that can ethically be taken with a 6.5 Creedmoor? Number of pounds or species / class of game. This is not a question regarding possibilities; it is a question regarding ethics.
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Old 05-17-2019, 11:29 AM
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Most big game.Depends on bullet placement like any caliber. Hogs, all deer species, elk, all sheep, coyotes. antelope the are all game this caliber can take. If you cannot hit the target animal makes no difference what you shoot

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Old 05-17-2019, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by edgerly779 View Post
Most big game.Depends on bullet placement like any caliber. Hogs, all deer species, elk, all sheep, coyotes. anelops. If you cannot hit the target animal makes no difference what you shoot

The point on bullet placement is well taken. But my feel is that anything over, say three hundred pounds, is questionable. My goal is a quick kill and no suffering. Then again, some say I've been cursed with an overly conservative outlook on things. As always, your advice has been most helpful though.
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Old 05-17-2019, 11:50 AM
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A lot of this answer boils down to your personal shooting ability. I “regularly” shoot a 308. for large game. When I’m hunting pigs at home I never shoot past 75yds even though I can shoot 3x that fairly accurately. Get me on a trip for a muley hunt in Idaho I’m gonna guess and say my shooting ability will be reduced significantly due to the excitement. What I’m saying is the answer is going to be different for you as it would be for me depending on the circumstances.
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Old 05-17-2019, 12:08 PM
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Originally Posted by bigboarstopper View Post
A lot of this answer boils down to your personal shooting ability. I ďregularlyĒ shoot a 308. for large game. When Iím hunting pigs at home I never shoot past 75yds even though I can shoot 3x that fairly accurately. Get me on a trip for a muley hunt in Idaho Iím gonna guess and say my shooting ability will be reduced significantly due to the excitement. What Iím saying is the answer is going to be different for you as it would be for me depending on the circumstances.

When I say 6.5 Creedmoor, I'm not intending long distance shots though the round seems touted a lot for that. I'm a beginner. The advantage for me of the 6.5 Creedmoor is that it shoots somewhat flatter than the .308 so there's less my mind has to think about (keep it simple). 75 yards would be absolutely sweet. But what if I'm only given more than 200? Or 175? You never learn if you don't try. Argh! On the other hand a 75 yard boar shot is going to get me as excited as a muley hunt in Idaho!
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Old 05-17-2019, 12:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirtlaw View Post
What is the largest game that can ethically be taken with a 6.5 Creedmoor? Number of pounds or species / class of game. This is not a question regarding possibilities; it is a question regarding ethics.
While shot placement is key, with large game like elk, anything below say 1500 ft lbs retained energy is not considered to be ethical.
With the 6.5 at factory loads that puts you around 400 yds max.
You can stretch that waay out for deer 😁
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Old 05-17-2019, 1:20 PM
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In my opinion, for what it's worth, you probably want something bigger for an elk. To some extent it also depends on the bullet you use and the distance you shoot. A 130 grain Nosler Accubond delivers 1500 ft-lbs at 225 yards. A 120 grain Hornady GMX (lead-free) round will get you to 325. I like to stay within 200 yards so it wouldn't be a practical problem for me but I'm not going to suggest you have to get as close as I like to.

For anything smaller than an elk, you're probably fine with the Creedmoor.
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Old 05-17-2019, 1:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirtlaw View Post
My goal is a quick kill and no suffering.
This whole thread is a loaded question, but you're going to have to answer a few things for yourself.

Long winded roundabout explanation ahead, but the short of it is as follows:

I don't see a problem going after elk or moose with a 6.5C and something like an accubond or a partition withing say 200 or so yards. Something meant to shed about 50% of it's weight but otherwise hold together. Put it behind the shoulder and don't worry about it. Stay away from quartering towards shots where you're likely to hit the point of the shoulder, and stay away from heavy quartering away shots where you have to go through the liver to get to the vitals. This limits you to broadside and light quartering away for the most part. If you want to increase the number of shots you can take, take a heavier gun with the same bullet. The goal is to put enough bullet with enough velocity and enough fragments THROUGH the vitals (not just in them). The bullet doesn't have to exist, but I think it's better if it both exists AND frags in the vitals.


Anyway, here's the long winded explanation people can disagree with.

You said you're goal is "a quick kill and no suffering". There is one definite way to do that, a shot to the CNS (specifically the brain). The brain is a small target, animal heads usually move, and missing can cause some horrendous suffering (imagine blowing the jaw off a deer only to have it run into the woods, barely bleeding, in pain, unable to eat, only to be picked off by a predator or starve to death). If you intend to shoot it in the brain, well WDM Bell killed elephants by shooting them in the brain with (among others) a 7x57.

That being said, if you amend your statement to be "My goal is to have the highest probability of killing an animal with the least amount of pain or suffering" your possibilities open up. A shot just in the front of the shoulder, or in the high shoulder hitting or causing high velocity hydrostatic trauma to the autonomic plexus will put deer down RIGHT THERE. I've seen deer hit in this area drop straight down. All 4 legs fold up under them. They were standing and a split second later, their legs are folded up under them, their head is down, there's no visible breath coming from their nose. A shot to the high shoulder does something similar, but there's a theory that it hydrostatic shock causes a pressure increase in the fluid in the spinal column which essentially knocks the animal out. They aren't immediately dead, they are knocked out; but they tend to bleed out before they wake up. The reason these shots are preferable to brain shots is because if you miss a shot at the front of the shoulder you can miss behind and hit the heart, miss high and hit the spine/neck. Missing low is bad for the animal as you might just take off a leg. Missing in front is just a clean miss. You HAVE to use quickly expanding bullets and high velocity for this to work. That means as fast as you can get it moving in copper, lead gives you a bit more leeway; and you have to keep your range in check. I've seen these hits drop deer at 200 yards, I've never seen a deer hit in the right spot past that to say if it works well past there. I've shot deer in the high shoulder with copper bullets and it puts them down RIGHT NOW. I never took this shot before I started using copper.

From there you move to an even higher percentage shot, mid body vertically, just behind the shoulder. A hit to a deer there often takes out the top of the heart, the bronchials, and the front of both lungs. Deer hit there tend to buck, run a few yards, and collapse. Not as quick as a CNS hit or autonomic plexus hit, but still very fast, and higher percentage. Quickest deaths there seem to come from lead bullets. My personal theory is that lead bullets fragment while the soft tissue is being stretched to is absolute limit, causing secondary wounding beyond what would happen if that tissue were not stretched. This doesn't happen with copper bullets. A shot to this area with ballistic tips or some other fragmenting (or at least partially fragmenting) bullet carrying enough velocity to reliably fragment will put deer down within 10 or 20 yards in my experience. If you miss high, it ends up being a high shoulder shot. If you miss forward you hit the shoulder and possibly still take out the heart, the autonomic plexus or maybe still the heart. If you miss back you get a solid double lung hit. If you miss low you're in the heart. Most of those shots will put a deer down in pretty short order, the double long taking the longest time. I've tried this shot with copper bullets from 40 yards to 180 yards, and every time it resulted in a deer going further than I'd like. That same shot with ballistic tips reliably put deer down in 10-20 yards.

If you aim for the lungs you have a great big target, but death won't be that swift. It'll be sure, but not all that swift. A fragmenting bullet in the lungs is better than a solid or bonded bullet IMO.

If you go further aft and hit the liver you've most certainly killed that deer, but you're probably going to have to track it.

So, to the point of what size animal is 6.5C useful for, it's a sliding scale. If you limit yourself to 6.5C you can also limit your shots to animals where you can reliably make your preferred shot at whatever angle you want to shoot with whatever bullet you happen to be using. Will a 120 grain copper bullet from a 6.5C penetrate through both lungs of a broadside elk at 300 yards? almost certainly. Will that elk die be dead right there? Probably not. At that range that bullet probably isn't going fast enough to DRT anything, and aside from bone fragments there will be no secondary missiles to effect heavy wounding other than drilling a half inch hole through the lungs. That's a dead elk, but not in quick order. Is that quick enough for you? That's a question only you can answer.

When you hunt with copper at high velocity it's not terribly hard to get DRT results. When you hunt with copper at low velocity, it's unlikely to get DRT results. When you hunt with non-expanding big bore bullets at low velocity you'll almost never get DRT results. IMO and IME fragmenting lead bullets at moderate velocities give the best chance of very quickly (though not necessarily immediately) killing an animal with minimal suffering.

So kill things as you see fit. There's an awful lot of people out there who feel that as long as the animal dies within 100 or so yards it's all good. It only takes a few seconds, no worries. Then there are people who want to ensure that every animal they kill is DRT. The problem is, among them, both groups will see both types of kills. If you want a DRT animal you just need to make your best effort to give yourself the highest probability of doing that.
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Old 05-17-2019, 1:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Dirtlaw View Post
The advantage for me of the 6.5 Creedmoor is that it shoots somewhat flatter than the .308 so there's less my mind has to think about (keep it simple).
This won't matter for pretty much any .308 class cartridge.

Sight it in 2 inches or so high at 100 yards. Put the crosshairs on the X for anything inside of 250 yards. Pass on longer shots.

If you are dead certain you want to take a shot longer than that, always always always aim for fur. If you feel like you need to put the crosshairs OVER the animal, the shot is just too far.
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Old 05-17-2019, 2:05 PM
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Thanks to everyone for lots of helpful answers. There's lots to learn, but things are starting to come into focus. My quest moves forward.



Life continues to be interesting.
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Old 05-17-2019, 2:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Dirtlaw View Post
When I say 6.5 Creedmoor, I'm not intending long distance shots though the round seems touted a lot for that. I'm a beginner. The advantage for me of the 6.5 Creedmoor is that it shoots somewhat flatter than the .308 so there's less my mind has to think about (keep it simple). 75 yards would be absolutely sweet. But what if I'm only given more than 200? Or 175? You never learn if you don't try. Argh! On the other hand a 75 yard boar shot is going to get me as excited as a muley hunt in Idaho!
If your a ďbeginnerĒ meaning you have little to no exposure to big game hunting your ability to shoot under pressure (classic buck fever) has yet to be tested or learned to control. My ability to control my ďbuck feverĒ is pretty easy when Iím shooting at a pig or some crappy forked horn at home. Thatís why I gave my ďIdaho muleyĒ example. I have no exposure to that highly desired situation and Iíd bet my buck fever would be off the charts significantly reducing my shooting abilities if I canít find a way to control it.

This is why Iím always repeating myself when somebody posts about ďcan I take my .223 huntingĒ (usually AR15) hunting question. My answer is always a big fat No! Then I spew my normal response: ďalways choose a caliber that can ethically kill the largest the species your hunting has to offer, at the furthest distances your capable of shooting, while allowing for a reasonable margin of errorĒ. Iíve repeated it in here a 100 times. Then of course I get the blow back from the peanut gallery here on the forum. But Iíve also seen it a 100 times in the field with the guided hunters I take. Regardless of the caliber they use and the experience they have shooting. Talking a shot at a live animal in a hunting situation is not the same as target shooting. Iíve seen many people with shooting skills that exceed well beyond my own literally vibrate when itís time to take a relatively easy shot on a pig and miss. Iíve done it myself. Thatís why I push people to chose a caliber that fits the criteria listed above.

That being said. If the 6.5 is comparable to the 308 than itís probably just as good or better as a 308 for big game. Wow, could have saved a lot of typing had I just said that instead of the novel I just wrote here
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Old 05-17-2019, 3:39 PM
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Take most of the range and weights recommended to you on this thread and the figure one-half to one-quarter that range and weight.

It's strange how that 100 yd shot turns into 200 or even 300 yards within a week of the hunt, and the one shot kill has three entry and three exit holes in the hide.

Find a good guide and go hunt with them. Listen to what they tell you. A guide will have had to chase a fair number of animals into the brush and they will know what caliber seems to prevent that the most.

Some folks will tell you you can never have too much gun, but I disagree. Beginners need to know that a follow-up shot will likely be needed within seconds of the first hit, and too much gun makes that follow up a challenge (so can too much scope).
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Old 05-17-2019, 7:00 PM
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I have always heard 1200 Ft Lbs of energy delivered on big game animals was the minimum for ethical hunting.. That will vary the yardage of ethics of every caliber used... Velocity and ft. Lb of energy remaining at yardage will tell you what is ethical...
Cheers...
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Old 05-17-2019, 7:43 PM
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Default A question regarding hunting ethics

Ethics are subjective.

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Old 05-17-2019, 7:51 PM
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For elk, just buy a .300 WM. They don't have to cost a lot. Bass Pro has a .300 WM Savage 110 with a Bushnell scope for less than $600 right now.

Confidence helps with my buck fever, and you do not want a wounded elk to travel any further than necessary, they can be in rough territory.

A .338 WM would not be too much.

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Old 05-17-2019, 8:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirtlaw View Post
When I say 6.5 Creedmoor, I'm not intending long distance shots though the round seems touted a lot for that. I'm a beginner. The advantage for me of the 6.5 Creedmoor is that it shoots somewhat flatter than the .308 so there's less my mind has to think about (keep it simple). 75 yards would be absolutely sweet. But what if I'm only given more than 200? Or 175? You never learn if you don't try. Argh! On the other hand a 75 yard boar shot is going to get me as excited as a muley hunt in Idaho!
This is the classic inexperienced hunter mindset; you're over thinking it. I absolutely don't mean that condescendingly. It is what it is. A lot of us have been there. Me included. We over think the nuances.

You're talking about a 200 yard max shot. The difference between a 6.5 and .308 in drop is negligable. Zero both at 200 yards like you should most hunting rifles.

The .308 will reach a max ordinate of around 2 inches.
The 6.5 will reach a max ordinate of around 1.75 inches.

that's 0.25" that you can only control by mentally compensating. Now think about all the other things you can control:
practice of range estimation
practice of shooting fundementals
practicing shooting positions
cardio training
shooting small game to work on buck fever
I could list on for a while--

Don't worry about the nuances so much. Prepare for the things that you have more input for.
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Old 05-17-2019, 8:38 PM
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You can kill anything with that round, even elephants.
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Old 05-17-2019, 10:21 PM
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I often refer folks to this website for similar questions.

https://www.ballisticstudies.com/Knowledgebase.html

Your cartridge of choice isn't included in the free sections, but the caliber is and cartridges you can extrapolate from.

For an emphatic quick kill, you're looking for hydrostatic shock. That falls off quicker than many realize.

But like some others have said, the flat shooting really doesn't come into play at the distance being considered.
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Old 05-18-2019, 6:06 AM
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You don't buy a truck and then figure out how to tow the maximum possible weight with it. You buy a truck that comfortably handles what you intend on towing. I hope that analogy works for you.
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Old 05-18-2019, 6:14 AM
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Ask ten experienced hunters this question and be prepared to receive ten different answers. With more than 30 years hunting elk I’m of the school that you need to keep it simple. Keep your shots within your ability to effectively hit your target. For me, I limit my shots to 300 yards although all my elk have been killed under 250 yards. While I’ve killed one elk with a 300wm, most of my elk were killed with a 30-06 shooting a 150 grain accubond or partition bullet. The last couple elk have been killed with a caliber my friends deemed a “varmint” gun (7mm-08). With the 7mm-08 I’m shooting a 140 grain Barnes TTSX Cooper bullet. It’s plenty gun for elk as long as you stay within your effective shooting range. The best advice I can give you, and one few would disagree with, would be to shoot your rifle a lot and from as many different shooting positions as possible. That will build confidence when your in the field. Three years ago I missed a beautiful 6x6 bull at only 225 using a new rifle that I had not shot as much as I should have. Good luck!
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Old 05-18-2019, 6:25 AM
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And UP Jumps the Devil. It's a lot more about the shooter/hunter than it is about the caliber/gun, can you make a shot? can you pass up a shot? do you have any idea about your limitations? Do you know your strengths and weaknesses? Do you have self control? Don't put to much into the rig or caliber you hunt with vs your abilities or lack there of. The 6.5 caliber of any flavor is a very nice cartridge but it isn't the end all of end all's. At 200 yards and under most cartridges from the .243 to the .300 RUM will work just fine for killing most anything your going to wander into in the United States and most other places. Learn to use it with a well constructed bullet placed in the right place and enjoy your venison.
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Old 05-18-2019, 6:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bull Elk View Post
Ask ten experienced hunters this question and be prepared to receive ten different answers. With more than 30 years hunting elk Iím of the school that you need to keep it simple. Keep your shots within your ability to effectively hit your target. For me, I limit my shots to 300 yards although all my elk have been killed under 250 yards. While Iíve killed one elk with a 300wm, most of my elk were killed with a 30-06 shooting a 150 grain accubond or partition bullet. The last couple elk have been killed with a caliber my friends deemed a ďvarmintĒ gun (7mm-08). With the 7mm-08 Iím shooting a 140 grain Barnes TTSX Cooper bullet. Itís plenty gun for elk as long as you stay within your effective shooting range. The best advice I can give you, and one few would disagree with, would be to shoot your rifle a lot and from as many different shooting positions as possible. That will build confidence when your in the field. Three years ago I missed a beautiful 6x6 bull at only 225 using a new rifle that I had not shot as much as I should have. Good luck!
BE, the bull in my avatar was dumped with a 150 gr Sierra SPBT 30-06, contrary to all the experts that push the superiowahumdinger mag that they want people to believe you just gotta have to kill one of those hairy tank like elk that don't die when punched through the bread basket by those old weak calibers. Hog Wash. Y'all have a good day. Did the rain stop there in Cali?
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Old 05-18-2019, 6:43 AM
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Just go hunt too much over thinking.

And be prepared your gonna have a wounded animal that you can't finish off......it happens to everyone.
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Old 05-18-2019, 6:48 AM
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Elk Hunter. You nailed it. Unfortunately, many (not all) but many hunters cannot shoot a magnum accurately due to recoil concerns. It is rather simple......practice practice and practice some more and hit’em in the vitals.

Yes....a good rain storm is coming through around noon today. I love it as it knocks down the pollen (allergies). Expecting to dump 2-4 inches at my place in Nevada County.
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Old 05-18-2019, 7:20 AM
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I have taken elk with 7mm mag, 300 wm, .308 and last one was with 6.8 spc.
Lngest sjot was 250 yards with 300 wm and closest was 50 yards with 6.8 spc. Killed a lot of hogs with .308.
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Old 05-18-2019, 7:33 AM
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As gun people, we many times over think caliber selection for hunting. Just remember, there guys out there every year dropping elk, moose, and bears with a bow. A 400 grain projectile, going 300fps. Makes them 6.5CM sound like a rocket doesn't it.

My suggestion, if you want to make a 300 yard or closer shot, and make it comfortable, practice shooting 600-800 yards. You often hear hunters say that 300 yards is a far shot. But if they practiced shooting out to 800, when they moved into 300, it would be an easy shot. It's more a mental trick your playing on yourself, but it works.
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Old 05-18-2019, 8:02 AM
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Originally Posted by NorCalFocus View Post
As gun people, we many times over think caliber selection for hunting. Just remember, there guys out there every year dropping elk, moose, and bears with a bow. A 400 grain projectile, going 300fps. Makes them 6.5CM sound like a rocket doesn't it.

My suggestion, if you want to make a 300 yard or closer shot, and make it comfortable, practice shooting 600-800 yards. You often hear hunters say that 300 yards is a far shot. But if they practiced shooting out to 800, when they moved into 300, it would be an easy shot. It's more a mental trick your playing on yourself, but it works.
This. Both my son and I have dropped full size white tails with my Opa's bolt action .223 and I've killed plenty with a Bear Whitetail II that's over 30 years old, and I killed my first deer with a 6mm Remington almost 40 years ago. Don't overthink it.

And enjoy the hunt. Good luck!
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Old 05-18-2019, 8:14 AM
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6 Rem is a pretty darn good cartridge, very under rated. To bad it didn't catch on very well.
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Old 05-18-2019, 8:27 AM
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Lol I’d much rather be shot with a rifle than a bow. Big difference in how the two work. I hunt with both and have had success with both and some failure. A bow is all about shot placement and bleeding out the animal as fast as possible and hoping he lays down to rest and bleeds.

My fiancť shot a big Texas Nailgai using a 6.5 Norma and dropped it dead with a nice broadside shot from about 200 yards. Nailgai are known to be a very tough animal to kill.
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Old 05-18-2019, 8:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bull Elk View Post
Elk Hunter. You nailed it. Unfortunately, many (not all) but many hunters cannot shoot a magnum accurately due to recoil concerns. It is rather simple......practice practice and practice some more and hitíem in the vitals.

Yes....a good rain storm is coming through around noon today. I love it as it knocks down the pollen (allergies). Expecting to dump 2-4 inches at my place in Nevada County.
Seems as though most shooters got very recoil sensitive we saw that even in the Army back when I went through Basic. Guy's complained about how hard the M14 kicked, I was truly in awe about that and could not understand what recoil they were talking about. It's been raining off and on here before I got home yesterday and looks like it's getting ready to let it rip pretty soon again here. Good for the farmers and me, having allergies sucks. I drove through snow yesterday to get across the Sierras.
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Old 05-18-2019, 9:35 AM
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Break a little bone in that front shoulder and you'll be just fine
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Old 05-18-2019, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by elk hunter View Post
6 Rem is a pretty darn good cartridge, very under rated. To bad it didn't catch on very well.
My dad kept that gun until it had a mechanical failure and Remington offered him a deal on a new gun because it was discontinued. We killed a lot of deer and a few elk with it. Great cartridge.
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Dude went full CNN...
Peace, love, and heavy weapons. Sometimes you have to be insistent." - David Lee Roth
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Old 05-18-2019, 11:33 AM
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This is the classic inexperienced hunter mindset; you're over thinking it. I absolutely don't mean that condescendingly. It is what it is. A lot of us have been there. Me included. We over think the nuances.

You're talking about a 200 yard max shot. The difference between a 6.5 and .308 in drop is negligable. Zero both at 200 yards like you should most hunting rifles.

The .308 will reach a max ordinate of around 2 inches.
The 6.5 will reach a max ordinate of around 1.75 inches.

that's 0.25" that you can only control by mentally compensating. Now think about all the other things you can control:
practice of range estimation
practice of shooting fundementals
practicing shooting positions
cardio training
shooting small game to work on buck fever
I could list on for a while--

Don't worry about the nuances so much. Prepare for the things that you have more input for.

The small game point is something I've thought about a lot. Just not sure where that's available close to Orange County. I just want some place where I can practice without being hassled.
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Old 05-18-2019, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by BillyGoatCrawler View Post
This is the classic inexperienced hunter mindset; you're over thinking it. I absolutely don't mean that condescendingly. It is what it is. A lot of us have been there. Me included. We over think the nuances.

You're talking about a 200 yard max shot. The difference between a 6.5 and .308 in drop is negligable. Zero both at 200 yards like you should most hunting rifles.

The .308 will reach a max ordinate of around 2 inches.
The 6.5 will reach a max ordinate of around 1.75 inches.

that's 0.25" that you can only control by mentally compensating. Now think about all the other things you can control:
practice of range estimation
practice of shooting fundementals
practicing shooting positions
cardio training
shooting small game to work on buck fever
I could list on for a while--

Don't worry about the nuances so much. Prepare for the things that you have more input for.

You hit the nail on the head. Maybe its my work. I am overthinking.
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Old 05-18-2019, 11:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirtlaw View Post
The small game point is something I've thought about a lot. Just not sure where that's available close to Orange County. I just want some place where I can practice without being hassled.
Iím an engineer. I understand over thinking things, haha.

I donít know down south well for hunting, but hereís what Iíd do:
Iíd go out for jack rabbit. Hit BLM land or NF land. Thereís plenty of info on this forum that you can search to find leads on spots. Youtube is another good resource. When youíre out there, scan before moving and you can find them hiding/resting in the shade under brush. That will give you opportunity to shoot a stationary animal from a standing or kneeling position. If you spook them, that will give you a very tough moving shot to practice. That practice will put you miles ahead for your first shot on big game.

Then you get some easy practice to gut and skin them without having to drag a 100+ lb body for a mile or two. Cook the jacks in a slow cooker like you would beef stew.
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Old 05-18-2019, 6:12 PM
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# 30, Elk Hunter, guys that complained about the M 14 recoil being too much are way under powered in the shoulders ! Didn't bother me a bit in '65 at Ft Ord on the Trainfire Ranges. A wet weight of of 130 lbs and shoulders not so wide until I got into pipe fitting years later, a lot of new recruits and draftees hadn't ever fired any kind of rifle more than .22lr. My preference is Rem 7 mag.

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Old 05-18-2019, 10:26 PM
Imageview Imageview is offline
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6.5 creed is pretty similar to 6.5 swede. That's been used for just about everything in Europe, and probably fine for everything in North America except Brown Bear or Buffalo. But like everyone else said, it's only as good as the guy shooting it. If you have a question about your ability to make a particular shot, don't pull the trigger and wait for a better opportunity. Better that than messing it up.
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Old 05-19-2019, 12:28 AM
tsmithson tsmithson is offline
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Everyone knows that the 6.5 C is the perfect caliber to hunt wild and dangerous Tofu. It can knock down any size of Tofu on the planet and is especially good at the thick skinned wrapping on Tofu at long distances. This is a specialty caliber made for Tofu and the modern Hunter.
Good luck and happy hunting!
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Old 05-19-2019, 6:03 AM
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What's really going to mess with you is a textbook perfect hit with an adequate caliber and the animal doesn't know it's dead for a minute or two.

It happens.
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Old 05-19-2019, 7:52 AM
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Hmm another is my gun big enough?
It sounds like you already made up your mind on the creed.
I don't own one or shot it but I want to see what they hype is all about.
Nothing wrong with the 6.5CM. Proper bullet (hunting bullet-not target bullet) and shot placement, and that is pretty much it.
As mentioned earlier Swed's have been using the 6.5x55 on moose for about 100 years now? So, to me a deer or elk should be ok. I'd be comfortable up too 500 yards if you don't hit bone... as in shoulder. with a gut shot even 300 win mag won't matter and the animal will die miles later for nothing.
Regarding ethics. Everyone has their version, but for your shooting distance ethic I would have to see if you can put 3 shots on paper plate at 100 yards standing up in free hand situation or maybe even 200 yards and you shall receive your answer what the ethical distance is for YOU.
Any one can shoot from the bench with rifle on bags or bi pod. And Since you're green to hunting, you also need to know your limits with the angles of shots presented. In real world you don't always get perfect broadside shot opportunity.
I practice a lot on an 8" gong which is smaller than the kill zone of lets say 12" plate. My motto is aim small, miss small. Once you start shooting moa at 200 or 300 yards (from bench) you can then try and practice at 400 or 500 . which for me I noticed little things really start to matter and add up.
Practice makes perfect.
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