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Old 10-22-2021, 3:35 PM
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Default Late November 1955 made M1 Garand

I bought this beautiful Springfield Armory M1 Garand in May of 1986 at the Great Western Gun Show in Pomona Ca. I had a booth there and would walk the show during "dealer day".

I didn't own a Garand and saw this beauty. I bought it for $495. It's a very late production 5.9 million SN rifle with a barrel date of 11-55, which matches the last production SN, which were produced in 1955, 56 and 57.

It's still all Springfield Armory parts, at least as far as I can tell.

The rifle also went through a Arsenal rebuild at the Red River Arsenal in Texas, as it has "RRA" proofs on the stock.

It appears to have never been shot after it went through the arsenal rebuild. No indications or markings as to the date of the refurb. The rebuild had to be in 1962 or before, as the "Red River Arsenal" was renamed the "Red River Army Depot" after 1962.

Enjoy!














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Old 10-22-2021, 4:09 PM
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Looks similar to the 5.95 SA I got from the CMP back in the early 90s. Mine was also RRA rebuild with all original parts. It had a tigerstriped front HG. I made a Calgunner real happy when I sold it to him. These (IMHO)were the finest quality M1s ever... I had a few WW2 guns I liked better.. but they’re no where near as nice. Thanks for sharing yours with us.
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Old 10-22-2021, 4:27 PM
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Is the breech naked or parkerized?
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Old 10-22-2021, 4:41 PM
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Awesome.
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Old 10-22-2021, 5:41 PM
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Originally Posted by socal m1 shooter View Post
Is the breech naked or parkerized?

I'm not sure, I'll try and check tonight. What is the significance of a naked or parked breech?

It looks to be parkerized.

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Old 10-22-2021, 6:55 PM
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I'm not sure, I'll try and check tonight. What is the significance of a naked or parked breech?

It looks to be parkerized.
Parkerized breech face = reparkerized the receiver/barrel during arsenal rebuild, from what I understand. So if you get some nice-looking rifle like the one pictured in the OP and you're wondering what that arsenal rebuild really entailed, the naked breech face can shed some light on that. If the barrel was still good internally when it came into the arsenal, but the finish was worn, they plugged the bore and reparkerized the receiver and barrel together. No point in removing the barrel if it still has life.
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Old 10-22-2021, 7:16 PM
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Originally Posted by socal m1 shooter View Post
Parkerized breech face = reparkerized the receiver/barrel during arsenal rebuild, from what I understand. So if you get some nice-looking rifle like the one pictured in the OP and you're wondering what that arsenal rebuild really entailed, the naked breech face can shed some light on that. If the barrel was still good internally when it came into the arsenal, but the finish was worn, they plugged the bore and reparkerized the receiver and barrel together. No point in removing the barrel if it still has life.
Cool. Thanks for the info.
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Old 10-22-2021, 7:18 PM
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Gus Fisher is well-known in M1 Garand circles. Back in the day, he used to post on the "Culver Shooting Page" forums. I think all those posts are lost; after the Culvers passed, the forum moved to a new host and a bunch of it disappeared.

Here's a post from Gus from 2007.

===================
Echelons of Maintenance Part I
Posted By: Gus Fisher
Date: Monday, 15 January 2007, at 8:44 am

I realize many folks have asked about or may be interested in the different Echelons of Maintenance done
in the Armed Forces for the Garand. While this subject can cover the major portion of a military career,
I'll try to give an overview of how it worked.

First Echelon was the owner/operator. That meant the Marine, Soldier, Sailor or Airman who was
actually issued the rifle and his job was to clean it, lubricate it and preserve it. It was a requirement that
everyone draw and clean their rifles at least once a week even in Garrison in peace time in the Corps.
This so the rifles wouldn't rust and the correct preventative maintenance be done on a timely basis. When
you stood most any kind of an inspection, you were required to have your weapon and it was inspected
along with your uniform and whatever gear the inspection called for. God Help You, if your rifle was
dirty and especially so if they found rust during those inspections.

2nd through 5th Echelon was the areas the rifles actually had repair done on them and replacement of
unserviceable parts. Each level had requirements for what the Armorers could do, the parts that could be
replaced, the tools and gages that were authorized at that echelon and what was required for the rifles to
have been considered serviceable. The Echelons were the same for all the Armed Forces and generally so
was what could be done at each echelon. They weren't exactly the same, though, as there were some
differences in how the services ran their maintenance procedures. I've seen things Marines do legally at
lower echelons of maintenance that the Army designates higher echelons do it even though it was
authorized at lower echelons. But the differences and all the regulations could fill books and we don't
want to get that detailed. Since I'm the most familiar with how Marines did it, I will explain it using the
Corps as an example.

OK, so at 2nd through 5th Echelon, you need someone who is trained in inspection and repair of
weapons and generally that person is known as "The Armorer." In the Marine Corps, that person carried
the Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) 2111 and the title of the MOS was Infantry Weapons
Repairman. After boot camp and Infantry Training Regiment, a young Marine was sent to Ordnance
School or a formal On the Job Training (OJT) program as I did after they closed the school at Quantico
and until all services began sending their Armorers to the Army School at Aberdeen. There, the Marine
was trained to inspect and repair weapons to at least 3rd Echelon repair standards with the tools and
gages allowed at that Echelon. After graduation, the Marine would be sent out to the Fleet where ever he
was needed.

2nd Echelon was and remains the Armory where the weapons are stored for ready issue to all Marines in
every company, battery or Battalion. Armorers were assigned there and they learned Armory Procedures
both from hands on instruction and training as well as from a correspondence course that was and still is
available. (There may or may not also be Arms Custodians assigned to assist in issue and recovery of
weapons, but they weren't Armorers. They were of some other MOS and were temporarily assigned to
that duty as required.) Besides a host of security duties, it was the Armorers job to inspect the rifles from
the weekly cleaning and ensure they were in a good state of repair or maintenance. Also, when someone
turned in a weapon and said something was wrong with it, the Armorer was expected to find out what it
was and repair it, if allowed at that Echelon or evac (take it) to a higher echelon shop where it could be
fixed. To be honest, there wasn't much you were allowed to fix at 2nd Echelon because you had none of
the special tools and gages. You could tighten screws and put something back together that someone
illegally had taken apart like a firing mechanism and some stoning and minor maintenance. They might
have allowed an Armorer at 2nd Echelon to replace cracked or broken handguards and maybe at some
Armories they were given authority to replace broken, cracked and loose stocks - but not all 2nd Echelon
Armories were allowed to replace stocks as that usually was a 3rd Echelon Repair Part.

At least once a year, all rifles in the hands of troops were required to have a Limited Technical Inspection
(LTI) done on them by 3rd Echelon. That could be accomplished by the Armorer filling out a Tactical
Equipment Repair Order (TERO) and scheduling with the 3rd Echelon Shop to bring say 25 to 75 rifles
in at a time, depending on how big a vehicle the Armorer got and how many rifles needed LTI's. Or, a
request could be made to have the 3rd Echelon Armorers come out on Contact Teams with the tools and
gages to inspect the weapons at the local commands. Out of Las Pulgas, we normally had at least one
Contact Team go out each week to some command on the base. It was also a requirement that the annual
inspection be done after the last time the rifle had been fired on the requalification range and prior to a
Marine being sent to the Rifle Range for Annual Requalification. This to ensure the Marine had a
correctly operating rifle with which to fire annual Requalification (no sense in sending the guy out with a
busted rifle) AND if the Marine didn't qualify, he couldn't blame the rifle if nothing broke during firing.
Since a Marine would not get promoted if he didn't at least shoot Marksman until the next year's
requalification, it was something pretty serious, especially for more senior Marines. All Marines from
Private through Gunnery Sergeant (E7) had to requalify each year with the service rifle. If you had been
waiting five or more years as a Staff Sergeant (E5 in the early years E6 in later years) and this was the
year you most likely would be promoted, you didn't want to screw up your promotion by not qualifying
that year. Grin.

OK, so at this stage it is time to talk about what the guys did at 3rd Echelon. During the LTI, the
Armorers used the gages most of us have at least read about or seen. That included Headspace gages,
timing block, piston gage, firing pin hole and protrusion gages, throat erosion gage, Field Test Bolt and
bore reflector. They also used trigger weights to ensure the trigger pull was at least 4 1/2 lbs and no more
than 7 1/2 lbs. They also did functioning checks of the parts and checked for cracks or anything that
made the stocks unserviceable. When they found something wrong, they filled out a NAVMC form 1018
tag (or Yellow Tag as it was generally called) and wrote down what was wrong with the rifle along with
information on the rifle and who did the inspection and their signature. If what was wrong was at least
3rd Echelon, then another Tactical Equipment Repair Order (TERO) was filled out on the rifle or rifles
that had to be fixed. They would then be turned over at the shop for repair.

In each 3rd Echelon shop, there was as storage cage where the weapons were kept while they were
waiting to be worked on and until any parts came in they required. Armorers would draw the weapons in
the chronological order the weapons were turned in and inspect them again and fill out order forms for
whatever parts were necessary. When the required parts were identified, you went to the appropriate
Technical Manual and checked each part to see if you were authorized to replace that part at 3rd Echelon.
If you were, you filled out the parts request and turned the rifle back into the storage cage until the parts
came in from supply. When they came in, you fixed the weapon. However, if the part was 4th Echelon or
above, then it had to have another (TERO) filled out on it and the rifle evac'd to the 4th Echelon shop,
wherever that was. On Camp Pendleton in the 70's, the 4th Echelon Shop was about a half hour drive
from the 3rd Echelon Shop. For example, replacing barrels was 4th echelon because even a 3rd Echelon
Shop did not have the wrenches, vices, chamber reamers and other "stuff" to replace barrels. After the
4th Echelon shop replaced the barrel, the Armorers from the 3rd Echelon shop would pick it up and
finish any other required maintenance and inspection.

Once the Armorer/s on the floor fixed the weapon in the 3rd Echelon Ship, it was turned into the Final
Inspection Cage. If it passed final inspection, it remained in that cage until the whole TERO was done
and the owning unit picked the weapons up. If it didn't pass inspection, it was sent back to the floor to
correct whatever had been missed or was not done correctly. (Of course, with the appropriate instruction
and/or butt chewing to the person/s who had worked on it. Grin.)

OK, this post has gone on pretty long, so will continue in the next post.
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Last edited by socal m1 shooter; 10-22-2021 at 7:21 PM.. Reason: Added Gus Fisher post
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Old 10-22-2021, 7:18 PM
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Part 2 from Gus.

Echelons of Maintenance Part II
Posted By: Gus Fisher
Date: Monday, 15 January 2007, at 9:01 am

OK, so where does 5th Echelon Depot Maintenance come in? This will be the primary concern of this
post.

Going back to the Armorer at the 2nd Echelon Armory, let's say he noticed a crack in the heel of the
receiver or a crack in the safety bridge. After the appropriate profane exclamation, as it didn't happen that
often, such a rifle would normally be evac'd to the 3rd Echelon Shop as the only rifle on that Tactical
Equipment Repair Order (TERO). The reason it would be the only rifle on the TERO was if it was
cracked, you were not going to get that rifle repaired and returned to your Armory. The 2nd Echelon
Armorer would evac it to 3rd Echelon and after they agreed it was cracked, they would evac it to 4th
Echelon. When the 4th Echelon shop agreed it was cracked, they would evac it to 5th Echelon. When
they agreed it was cracked, they would pull the receiver off and destroy it along the guidelines set forth
under NAVMC (Navy and Marine Corps) orders. They would also send notification back down through
the chain of command and the Unit who had the 2nd Echelon Armory where it came from, would order a
replacement rifle.

When we had such an M16A1 come into the 3rd Echelon shop that was bent into a "U" shape after
having been run over by an AMTRAC (Amphibious Tractor) it naturally piqued everyone's curiosity and
almost everyone had to look at it. We even made bets on just how few parts may still have been
serviceable. Of course, the Armorer also gave us our copy of the Official Investigation and that was
forwarded along with the rifle when we evac'd it to 4th Echelon.

As far as rifles were concerned 4th Echelon mainly just replaced barrels as they had the tools and gages
and the lathes and other machines to do more complicated work. They had MOS trained Machinists
working there to swage shoulders on barrels and do other work as required. But, if the rifle needed so
many parts to repair it that it cost more than 35 percent of the weapon value and or if the finish was worn
too much, they evac'd the rifle or rifles to 5th Echelon.

Now, if and when weapons came back from war or combat operations in really bad shape and there were
a lot of them in a company, battery and especially a Battalion, - then authority was requested and granted
to have bunches or blocks of weapons sent to 5th Echelon for repair and refinishing. ONLY 5th Echelon
was allowed to parkerize metal parts as they were the only ones to have the equipment to do it. They also
went through the rifles and stripped them down and inspected and gaged the parts with gages only 5th
Echelon was authorized. Two such gages for the Garand that some folks may be familiar with are the
receiver bridge gage and the "doughnut shaped" gas cylinder seat gage that checked the diameter of the
barrel where the front of the gas cylinder goes over it. If that was worn too small, then gas would escape
around the barrel between it and the gas cylinder. If that happened, the rifle wouldn't have enough gas
pressure to function correctly. There were also other gages 5th Echelon used and I'm sure others can
expand on that. Suffice it for now to say the receivers especially had to meet minimum inspection
requirements or there was no sense in rebuilding them. Weapons rebuilt and issued from the 5th Echelon
Depot Maintenance facilities were required to be "like new" after the work was performed. Once the
rifles were finished, the owning units were notified and they either came or picked them up if close
enough, or the rifles were sent to them if they were too far away. The Marine Corps only had two 5th
Echelon Shops at Barstow, California and Albany, Georgia and they basically took care of their "half" of
the country. So many if not most rifles that were rebuilt were shipped out.

Oh, speaking of that, it was and still is legal for the Armed Forces to send weapons through the U.S. Mail
in 1989, we received an M60 D machine gun through the post office.

Finally, for those who are not so chronologically challenged and never heard of a Tactical Equipment
Repair Order (TERO) - they changed the designation to Equipment Repair Order (ERO) in the mid to
late 70's not long after they changed everything from Federal Stock Numbers (FSN's) to National Stock
Numbers (NSN's) in the supply field.
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Last edited by socal m1 shooter; 10-22-2021 at 7:23 PM.. Reason: Added Gus Fisher post
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Old 10-22-2021, 7:32 PM
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That rifle in the OP is awful nice looking, and Gus has some advice for keeping the stock looking good like that: "Culver's Magic Paste," which is 1/3 beeswax, 1/3 turpentine, and 1/3 boiled linseed oil.

Here's what he had to say about all that:

Danish Oil and BLO
Posted By: Gus Fisher
Date: Tues 26 Dec 2006 5:23 pm

In Response To: Consensus Opinion: Best Finish for CMP Stock Sets?

It's been over 40 years since I first rubbed BLO into a shotgun stock believing at the time that it
protected the wood against the ravages of snow, wind, rain and water. I grew up on the Mississippi
River and we hunted rabbit, quail, squirrel, pheasants, duck, geese and later Racoons in my High
School years. We weren't well off and keeping the shotguns in good shape was a necessity as while
we would have had meat on the table most nights without the game we hunted or fish we caught, it
eased the grocery bills in finding ways to get more protein in our diet at lower cost.

There were a lot of things then that were "common knowledge" as what was thought to be good for
the maintenance of guns that I've since learned were either not so hot or just were not a good idea to
use and/or could harm the function of the guns. WD 40 was then almost new and most folks thought
it was the "cat's meow" to use on guns. We wiped it on the surface of the metal to help protect
against weather and rust. It did more good than not there, as we wiped it mostly off after putting it
on. However, some folks sprayed it into the trigger mechanisms of guns and not long afterwards
(compared to other oils) found so much crud had stuck inside that the guns began to malfunction.
More than a few gunsmiths still get most of their business just from taking guns apart and cleaning
the crap out of them that WD 40 glued in there. Since I found that out, we have never used WD 40
on or in a gun again.

I've found things out about BLO that have also led me to never again use it in any serious manner,
though we also used it on our stocks way back then before hunting season began and afterwards
when we put the guns away for the rest of the winter and early spring.

Some of you may know I've had a long interest in muzzleloading guns and that I've been the Team
Armourer (Gunsmith) for the United States International Muzzleloading Team for two World
Championships. Until quite recently, they did not allow reproductions to be shot in those matches.
That meant they were competing with original guns for the most part and quite expensive guns for
that reason. (Part of the reason I was chosen for that was because I?ve had a lot of experience
working on original and reproduction riles including over 30 years working them at the North South
Skirmish Association.) When you work on those guns, you have to know what was used back then
because they don?t allow any modern materials in that competition. If they didn't have it back then,
you can be disqualified for using more modern materials, if you get caught. An example of this is the
only glue they allow is "hide glue" as even Elmer's Carpenter glue was not around back then and
certainly not epoxy glues.

I've also been a buckskinner and historic reenactor since the early 70?s with a special love for the
18th century. I was always extremely interested in doing things the most authentic way possible and
that includes how things were made so I could make accurate reproductions in metal, wood and
leather. I've haunted libraries, museums, historic sites and probably driven many of the folks at
Colonial Williamsburg nuts over the years with my questions of what was used, when it was used
and why it was used (to include where they got the documentation for it) and have learned a lot over
three decades of doing it. I've also had in interest in antique furniture and the finish alone can help
date when a piece was made.

The frequent use of BLO came from the age of wooden ships and muzzleloading guns and really
caught the general public attention after so many returning G.I.'s had used it in WWI. On common
less expensive guns in the 18th century, they scraped the stocks and boned them to smooth the wood.
On guns that were sold to merchants as stock guns for average folks and the Indian trade, they often
just used beeswax to make the stocks shine and protect them somewhat from moisture. They also
used mixtures like Dick Culver's "magic paste" made from turpentine, BLO and beeswax on the
more expensive guns. The most expensive guns got lacquer or varnish because it was so expensive
and the gunsmiths, who made the finest and most expensive guns, had their reputations on the line to
make a really good living from the patronage of wealthy customers. If you have ever wondered why
there aren't more "average" guns still extant the further back in history you go, now you know the
reason. The average guns were used more and their lower grade wood finishes caused the original
wood stock to fail long ago.

BLO was the "average or poor man's" stock finish or maintenance/repair finish in the 19th century
right up through most of the 20th century. They had excellent varnishes back three or four centuries,
but it's use was mostly confined to fine furniture, wooden musical instruments and other "expensive"
items because Varnish was so expensive. The 19th century also showed the introduction of lacquers
in major arsenal or gun factory production. The Industrial age brought more economical transit that
caused the price of better finishes to go down and production rates required finishes that didn't take
forever to apply as in many hand rubbed coats of BLO. So the better finishes saved time and
therefore money in the long run.

I've also learned from Museum Curators that BLO causes an adverse biological reaction over
extended periods of time. Now, you aren't going to notice it in your lifetime, though. It usually takes
at least 100 years for this condition to really show up and of course in pieces that have seen more
outside use. That is part of the reason museums use special waxes on their older pieces made from
wood. It seals off the air from the BLO and is a finish that can be removed without damaging the
original finish below it.

As late as 1971 when I went through Marine Corps boot camp, we still sat on our buckets and rubbed
coats of BLO in our wooden stocks when there wasn't anything else to do. The primary reason we
did it was to make the stocks LOOK good for the final inspection. The other reason was because it
was still left over from the days when if there wasn't anything else more important to do, they made
you rub oil into your stock as busy work. Of course, with the introduction of the M16, this was no
longer needed or possible, so the practice was abandoned.

OK, so now after all that, it's time to take a look at Arsenal production of rifles and what they used to
finish wood stocks in the 20th century and why they did it. Dick Culver made some excellent points
on this and other things in the link supplied below:

http://www.jouster.com/Bulletin/TUNG.htm

Springfield Arsenal changed over from BLO to Tung oil for a number of reasons, but perhaps the
most important was how well the wood stocks and handguards would be sealed against the weather.
BLO is actually a POOR moisture sealant. Don't get me wrong, it is better than nothing at all, but it
isn't a good sealant. As I've mentioned, it just sort of lays there and waves at moisture going through
it in and out of the wood in different climates. However, even in the early 40's, tung oil was not
readily and easily obtainable and was much, much more expensive than BLO. Today we don't notice
the cost difference as much because transportation and manufacturing costs have come down so
much. However, compare the price of a quart of BLO in Walmart to a quart of Pure Tung oil or even
Tung Oil finishes, and you will notice that even today the stuff with Tung oil costs much more. We
as individuals don't consider the cost as much because we don't usually have that many firearms to
maintain. However, back in the 40's and 50's and right up to the 70's; the military wasn't going to buy
small containers of tung oil because the cost was MUCH higher than for BLO and tung oil does dry
out and coagulate more when stored. That would have increased the price even more. Combine that
with the fact that senior military leaders thought, "BLO was good enough 30 years ago when I was a
Lt. and it was good enough for as far back as I can remember (as in the Springfield 03's) why should
we go to something that costs more and doesn't last as long in storage?!!" So, they continued to issue
and use BLO as long as wooden stocks were on military rifles.

OK, so now that I've gone over what BLO doesn't do, it is time to say what it does do. The primary
reason it was issued was so that the wood parts and pieces would not dry out and crack. For
something as cheap as BLO was even then, that was a real benefit. As mentioned on the CMP site on
stock finishes, it can also be used to clean wood stocks. So, there was a practical side to it as well for
two good reasons. Finally, as Dick Culver and many of us found out in the service, if your stock
shined when you stood inspection, you were more likely to pass and do well. Even when an
Inspecting Officer was a real nit picking SOB and if you had a great looking stock, you would more
often be "forgiven" of other imperfections in your gear, uniform, etc., etc. That meant you wouldn't
be spending liberty time cleaning your rifle more or getting ready to be re-inspected. It also saved
you from Rocks and Shoals, Office Hours, Article 15, Captain's Mast or whatever the individual
service called their use of Article 15 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice for the Company
Commander to hit you with non judicial punishment. Since the CO could fine or have you confined,
it was and is something to be taken seriously. So, that's another practical benefit, I suppose. Grin.

Now, if you want the finish of a standard new commercial "G.I. type" stock to be absolutely
"authentic" then you seal it with pure tung oil and rub in many coats of BLO. In the case of collector
rifles, you could clean the surface with BLO and then rub that coat in well and buff it with a hand
cloth. THEN what you should really do with a collector rifle that you aren't going to use is to use the
preservative waxes that museums use. However, for a "shootin raffle" or one you are going to shoot
a lot, BLO is not nearly the best choice possible for a finish. Matter of fact, due to how it lets
moisture in and out, that's why it was abandoned for Match Rifles yeara ago. As Dick Culver has
mentioned about his "Magic Paste," that was used on NM rifles OVER the use of just BLO alone
because the beeswax in it made it even more moisture resistance.

Tru Oil was the standard finish all the Big Service National Match Rifle Teams used in the 70's and
80's because it is so superior to BLO and other finishes. Some folks liked and continue to like the
fact it is shiny. Some folks never cared for how shiny it gets or downright hate it, BUT they wanted
the best finish commonly used.

So after all that, I will finally get around to the topic mentioned in the title, but it is important to have
this background information to help explain why I mention what I do.

Danish oil is a polymerized oil and as such will better seal the stock than will BLO. I am not
absolutely sure about this, but I believe Tung Oil is better than Danish oil as a sealant. Maybe it isn't
and maybe there isn't enough difference, but Tung Oil is what was authentic if that is your basic
concern. As I've mentioned, Danish Oil is primarily an INDOOR furniture finish that doesn't fill up
the pores in the wood unless you put so many coats on that most people aren?t going to do it.
Because it is designed as in indoor finish, it is not as good as finishes that were designed for outdoor
use. Danish Oil is still better than just BLO as the only stock finish.

I don't doubt the average person will not "notice" problems with using Danish Oil and BLO. The
average person doesn't expose the stock to bad environments nearly as much as did/does the military
in training and combat conditions. In some climates where the humidity remains somewhat constant,
you won't notice the difference as much either. Since the average person doesn't notice the changes
in accuracy of when the stock swells and shrinks, they won't notice problems with that either. I'm not
being critical of anyone, but the average person doesn't shoot well enough to see many problems
caused by stock finishes. Besides that, if your rifle's barrel is already worn and the stock is loose, the
difference caused by the different finishes won't be noticeable at all. However, when I recommend
things like stock finishes, I can't help but have all those years of experience of building NM rifles at
least somewhat color my judgment about what is "best" to use or at least what is generally best to
use. That's why I recommend using two thin, well rubbed and stretched coats of Tru oil as a sealant
and then you can put anything over it you want to make it look like you want. If you want BLO for
the look and smell of what is "correct" over the Tru Oil, then OK. The Tru Oil will still be doing the
job it was intended to do under the BLO.

Now, the CMP sets already have a coat of something on them when you get them as a finish. If you
like the color of the wood and don't wish to refinish the wood (which I don't recommend) then I
would suggest putting two more thin/stretched coats of Tru Oil on it. Abrade the surface a bit with
the 3M scratch pades designed to replace steel wool in between coats so each further coat can grip
the older coat below it. If that leaves it too shiny for your taste, then abrade it again and rub really
hard over it with a common/clean terry cloth hand towel. That will leave a dull lustre finish.

Then and only then, if you just HAVE to do it, put BLO on it. Better still put Culver's Magic Paste
on it. But the BEST thing most people can do to protect and preserve the stocks on their shootin'
raffles is to put another coat on about once a year just prior to the shooting season or just after it.
Abrade it and rub it and let the Tru Oil do the job that BLO can't begin to do and Danish Oil doesn't
do nearly as well - that is as a preservative and protective finish.
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Old 10-22-2021, 8:39 PM
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How would a gun made in 1955 get shot enough to need a rebuild? It was used in boot camp?
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Old 10-23-2021, 7:39 AM
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If you have interest in the dates for the parts, the bolt was made between mid 1942 and mid 1944.
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Old 10-23-2021, 9:22 AM
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Most have seen the famous photo of a US serviceman doing maintenance in some far-flung place, surrounded by stacks of rifles. Clearly some of what he is working on are M1 Garands. I’m sure the process at Anniston under the DCM/CMP is more orderly but similar.

Likewise, I expect many have seen photos of M1 Garands and other weapons being sealed in steel drums for long-term storage. I have no idea if RRA was involved in that, but quite possibly the rifle in the OP was refurbished and put away in that fashion before being sold via the DCM and resold at Crossroads Pomona.
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Old 10-25-2021, 7:35 PM
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Nice Garand! I remember Pomona show. walking with my dad. I wasn't much into guns back then but I was in to cars. That show was so cool. I remember when CHP switched to a new Chevy body style with LT1. I used to argue with CHP officers at the show showing up a new cars how much faster my old Pontiac were. They just laugh and kept on saying that radio is faster then a car, I didn't understand at the time but do now. Miss that show and how friendly LE were at that time.
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Old 10-26-2021, 4:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 7.62user View Post
Nice Garand! I remember Pomona show. walking with my dad. I wasn't much into guns back then but I was in to cars. That show was so cool. I remember when CHP switched to a new Chevy body style with LT1. I used to argue with CHP officers at the show showing up a new cars how much faster my old Pontiac were. They just laugh and kept on saying that radio is faster then a car, I didn't understand at the time but do now. Miss that show and how friendly LE were at that time.
They had them there in spring and fall. Yea, it was an event I never missed. Closing Pomona pizzed me off so bad, I moved to the OC.... now Newscum is shutting down the OC show.
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