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10mmOutdoors
08-29-2013, 11:35 AM
I have an issue with the trigger rubbing on the trigger guard. This is a recent purchase and I didn't notice any grittiness at time of purchase but it could have very well been there. It's not noticeable to me when I pull the trigger but I can really feel it during reset. I'm new to revolvers, so I'm wondering if this is inherent to Ruger revolvers ? The scratches are only on one side of the trigger, which makes me think that the trigger is not centered. The tolerance between the trigger and the guard is very tight too. I can't see how adjusting could be possible. I have a S&W 686 and I don't have the rubbing issue on that one. Granted, the action is different. Any insight from you revolver folks is appreciated. Look to the dark scratches ,behind the trigger, in the pic.


http://i594.photobucket.com/albums/tt28/jkrob08/050_zps09d2ca5b.jpg (http://s594.photobucket.com/user/jkrob08/media/050_zps09d2ca5b.jpg.html)

john323
08-29-2013, 3:04 PM
Is it rubbing on the top near the frame or on the bottom of the trigger guard?

Chief-7700
08-29-2013, 3:21 PM
Take it apart and see where the trigger is rubbing.

'ol shooter
08-29-2013, 4:54 PM
Contact Ruger directly, do not disassemble it. They have excellent Customer Service, and they will take care of you.

10mmOutdoors
08-29-2013, 11:40 PM
Contact Ruger directly, do not disassemble it. They have excellent Customer Service, and they will take care of you.

Ruger does have excellent customer service.

10mmOutdoors
08-29-2013, 11:44 PM
Is it rubbing on the top near the frame or on the bottom of the trigger guard?

It looks to be the frame upon closer inspection.

ar15barrels
08-30-2013, 1:05 AM
It's a firearm, not a Rolex.
Most of my revolvers have little drag marks like that on hammers or triggers if you actually use them a lot.
If you keep them locked in the safe and never fire them, they will stay scratch-free...

10mmOutdoors
08-30-2013, 5:57 AM
It's a firearm, not a Rolex.
Most of my revolvers have little drag marks like that on hammers or triggers if you actually use them a lot.
If you keep them locked in the safe and never fire them, they will stay scratch-free...

As stated in my OP, I'm new to revolvers. The grittiness is noticeable as the trigger resets. If this is a normal condition, so be it. I'll be polite and say thank you for the feedback. I'll call Ruger today to confirm.

ar15barrels
08-30-2013, 10:38 AM
The grittiness is noticeable as the trigger resets. If this is a normal condition, so be it. I'll be polite and say thank you for the feedback.

A little grittyness is common on new guns.
Once they break-in with use, they smooth out.

Gunsmith Dan
08-30-2013, 10:03 PM
Yes new guns should be shot between 200 and 500 rounds, depending on firearm type, to have a proper break in before doing any work on them.

10mmOutdoors
08-31-2013, 3:29 AM
A little grittyness is common on new guns.
Once they break-in with use, they smooth out.

Yes new guns should be shot between 200 and 500 rounds, depending on firearm type, to have a proper break in before doing any work on them.

Thank You. Very much appreciated

tal3nt
08-31-2013, 11:33 AM
My unissued bulgarian Mak from 1979 had the heaviest, grittiest trigger when I got it. 500 rounds later it feels like the single and double action pulls both dropped at least a pound, and the grittiness is completely gone. I'd say shoot it a lot; one of the best trigger jobs you can do.

Regarding the side scratches, most triggers do that from my experience. Its probably Because our pull isn't ever perfectly rearward. Those things need to develop until the wear eventually stops at one point. Then you will have one buttery trigger

r6533
09-06-2013, 7:26 PM
I'm not a gunsmith but I've heard that a dab of molybdenum disulfide or anti-sieze compond on the interacting trigger parts and a time of dry fire while watching TV can expedite the "smoothing" process. Once done, the moly should be removed.

ar15barrels
09-06-2013, 9:46 PM
I'm not a gunsmith but I've heard that a dab of molybdenum disulfide or anti-sieze compond on the interacting trigger parts and a time of dry fire while watching TV can expedite the "smoothing" process. Once done, the moly should be removed.

Rather than grease that would slow the polishing, I would probably put some 600grit clover in there and let everything lap itself smooth.
Then flush out the clover and grease it.

I had an old but almost unfired colt commander through my shop today that had a binding between the slide and frame.
5 minutes with some 500grit clover and the slide moves nice and smooth now.

Gunsmith Dan
09-07-2013, 11:43 AM
Using a Lapping compound is great to smooth out a firearm in just about every area except one area .... the trigger/sear engagement area.

Yes you do want to polish the area very good to get a smooth action BUT the actual "let go" point in most cases is better to have a very thin sharp edge to give you the crisp and exact let off pull after pull.

If you were to use lapping compound in that area you would start rounding off all the edges.

'ol shooter
09-07-2013, 2:08 PM
Especially on a revolver S/A sear and hammer.

Wrangler John
09-09-2013, 5:30 AM
I just looked at my Redhawk and it has the exact same marks. If you are right handed your trigger finger will push the trigger to the left either when it resets single action or during the entire double action stroke. Those marks are perfectly normal.

10mmOutdoors
09-30-2013, 11:53 PM
I'm glad that I checked in. Thanks for the tips all. BTW, I shoot right handed.