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1911aholic
04-21-2013, 2:52 PM
Shouldn't all guns have import marks or stamps on them, and if they don't, what would be the reasons for that? I have a German long gun that doesn't have any import marks, circa 1944-45.

Fate
04-21-2013, 3:17 PM
The Gun Control Act of 1968 required import marks. Anything imported prior to that date didn't have one. Rifle could also be a bring back of some sort, but without paperwork, that can't be proved and thus no premium value added. Still, non-import marked rifles are preferred by many collectors (myself included) and will often sell for more than import marked weapons.

Chaos47
04-21-2013, 3:27 PM
^All good info.

Could also have a small mark on the bottom of the barrel. Those are often overlooked...

1911aholic
04-21-2013, 3:36 PM
Thank you Calgunners !!
Fate and Chaos47

empirearms
04-23-2013, 10:46 PM
The Gun Control Act of 1968 required import marks.

Actually military firearms were totally forbidden from importation from the passage of the 1968 GCA until May, 1986 (a period of eighteen very long years), and it was only at that time import marking was required (they were indeed required for commercial firearms imported between 1968 & 1986, but since ZERO military arems could be imported during that time-period they were not required to be import-stamped).

Anything imported prior to that date didn't have one.

That is correct, however most items imported after 1948 were required to have the country of origin stamped on them (thus ITALY on Carcano rifles and GERMANY on the many Luger and P-38's imported during that period). A town in Japan actually renamed itself Usa, so that items produced there could be stamped MADE IN USA.

Rifle could also be a bring back of some sort, but without paperwork, that can't be proved and thus no premium value added.

Most "capture documentation" was discarded or simply lost after the items reach these shores (and the person who brought them back was no longer in the military). On a personal note I only found the DD-603-1 capture papers (literally thirty of them) for the items I brought or sent home from Vietnam some thirty years later when my mother was moving and discovered a box of my "junk" in the attic of her old house (including two of my purple hearts and my silver star, among other priceless items such as bundles of letters from my deceased 2nd wife that were worth nothing to me when I carelessly stored them).

Still, non-import marked rifles are preferred by many collectors (myself included) and will often sell for more than import marked weapons.

Not really true anymore. . . most MODERN collectors (those who have been collecting for a decade or less) expect the weapons they purchase to have import marks (and many items cannot be obtained without import marks). The only issue NOW is whether they are "subtle" marks (side or bottom of the barrel) or BILLBOARD markings on the receiver. :eek:

For some items (especially Russian-captured "Death Head" and single-rune 98k's) the import marks are a PLUS as they establish documentation of authenticity that unmarked items simply do not have.

the_tunaman
04-23-2013, 11:24 PM
:useless:
Post some pics!!!

pitfighter
04-23-2013, 11:37 PM
Dennis,

Open any gun magazine from the late 1940's 1950's or 1960's there are many, many ads for military rifles - K98's, were often amongst the lowest priced.

These would have been imported into the US from Europe and were for sale via mail order to the general public, most would not have import marks.
Many, I am sure, are also those rifles now circulating and selling for a premium as vet closet finds - that is another story.

Most collectors I know (and I am a relatively modern collector), myself included, do try to find firearms without import marks, as the import marks do affect the desirability and to a degree the historical value, as well as, theoretically the chain of events between the battlefield and your gun safe.
However, this last part is dubious reason to pay so much more, but there you have it.

Check this ad out, they are around the corner from me - http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-0AoDKp2QXWw/TtTS7s_UBPI/AAAAAAAAEmk/Z7c6iBrgxQ4/s1600/1959+Gun+Magazine+002.jpg

To the OP - your German long gun could have been brought by a vet from either world war, or bought mail-order in the period before long arms had to be marked, it could also have been brought back by a tourist from Europe, in the days when this sort of thing was permitted.

Long answer to; you don;t have to be concerned, enjoy the rifle.
Take a picture of it and post it - you may have something valuable.

I just bought an unmarked G33/40 Mauser and it cost more than my first car.

Pit.

empirearms
04-24-2013, 6:26 AM
Dennis,

Open any gun magazine from the late 1940's 1950's or 1960's there are many, many ads for military rifles - K98's, were often amongst the lowest priced.

I've been collecting military arms since 1958. The reason the 98k riflle were so low priced is because 8mm ammo was scarce in the U.S. (as was all metric ammo for several decades). That is also why we see many 98k's that were "sporterized" and rebarrelled to a more obtainable caliber.

I just bought an unmarked G33/40 Mauser and it cost more than my first car.

My dinner last night cost more than my first car. :facepalm:

Quiet
04-24-2013, 6:40 AM
I have an Enfield No4Mk1 that does not have any import marks.
It's a Sterling 7.62x51mm conversion.
:shrug:

pitfighter
04-24-2013, 2:05 PM
Dennis, yes, sorry, without a reference to date my comment was useless.
I bought my first car at 18 yrs in 1991 - it cost $2500.

Quiet, they started to convert Enfields to the Nato caliber in 1958.

Pit.