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View Full Version : Mosin 91/30 ex sniper value.


Rimfire123
04-06-2013, 9:55 AM
what would be fair price for izvesh ex sniper in very good condition?

thanks

Marcus von W.
04-06-2013, 10:02 AM
If it's a typical 1943 Izhevsk PU ex-sniper, probably around $150 - $200. 1942 Izhevsk PEM siderail rifles, 1942 PU rifles, and post-war PU rifles like the 1947 are worth a lot more, in the $400 range.

eagle eye
04-06-2013, 10:11 AM
Today's market will be $300 to $350 if you can find one $30 more for a Tula or laminated stock. Not sure about the pem side rail but is more rare.

Rimfire123
04-06-2013, 10:22 AM
I think its 1930s ex sniper, the ones with holes plugged. Per seller all numbers match and not counter bored. Have to check the condition of the bore and wood condition looks decent.

eagle eye
04-06-2013, 10:43 AM
http://62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinFeatures08.htm
Only the hex top mount are from the 30' the rest where made In the late 30'

Marcus von W.
04-06-2013, 10:49 AM
Condition and degree of originality such as correct stock and handguard all affect value. Photos would be very helpful.

1930's dated Izehvsk snipers are very, very rare - most examples one encounters are replicas or fakes. The most common and lowest price Izhevsk sniper is the '43 PU, followed by the '44 PU.

Emdawg
04-06-2013, 11:19 AM
A normal ex-sniper is anything from $150-250 depending on type and condition.

Rimfire123
04-06-2013, 11:25 AM
Condition and degree of originality such as correct stock and handguard all affect value. Photos would be very helpful.

1930's dated Izehvsk snipers are very, very rare - most examples one encounters are replicas or fakes. The most common and lowest price Izhevsk sniper is the '43 PU, followed by the '44 PU.

I will check with the seller, on Tuesday. He bought this rifle from Big 5 long ago and never shot it.

89 Vision
04-06-2013, 12:15 PM
I've been trying to collect ex-snipers, they're a lot of fun. Buy it if he doesn't want t crazy amount.

NOTABIKER
04-06-2013, 5:33 PM
sold my run of the mill 1943 izzy for 300 4 months ago. it had all the proper ex sniper markings and was a good shooter.

Marcus von W.
04-06-2013, 6:15 PM
How about some current real prices for some currently available ex-snipers from my personal collection:

If anyone is looking for some rare and desirable, very restorable, ex-snipers in outstanding condition, I have 3 for sale.

1. The first is a 1942 Tula PEM. It's in a beautiful laminate stock that is already inletted for the mount base Remove the old cut off mounting screws and locating pins in the receiver, have Mike Battersby convert the bolt to sniper configuration, then add one of the various currently available reproduction mounts and either an original PEM scope or one of the replicas available from Accumounts and on Ebay, and you will have a shootable, very affordable, example of an otherwise incredibly expensive and almost impossible to obtain rifle. Price on this one is $450 + shipping - these are ultra rare, it took me years to find this one and another one I sold not too long ago, and it is the best I was able to find.

For the discerning collector who wants the maximum in authenticity and original appearance, I have a mount setup I will sell with this rifle that is one of the ones Dmitry "Feldscher" had made several years ago by the original manufacturer in the former Soviet Union. Dmitry's mounts are light years ahead of any of Ukrainian or Chinese made ones that are currently available, and he only made a very small number of these, that have been out of production, unavailable, and highly sought after for years. Price for this mount is $400 - yeah, it's a lot more than the $250 Chinese copies, but you get what you pay for.

2. The second is a 1942 Tula PU rifle - again, a super rare and super hard to find "First Year/Stalingrad Era" PU rifle. This one is also in a laminate stock. This is one of the desirable rifles imported by Aztec, and was hand selected for me by my friend John Jones, who was manager of Aztec at the time. The Aztec rifles are prized for their superior condition and the very small and inoffensive import mark on the barrel, which many advanced and serious collectors (myself included) find much more desirable than the big, butt-ugly, rough as a cheese grater, import marks that deface the receivers of most more recently imported rifles like the ones from Century.
Price on this rifle is $450 + shipping.

3. The third is a scarce and desirable 1942 Izhevsk PU rifle. Again, a "first year" and "Stalingrad era" rifle from Aztec that was hand selected for me by John Jones. This rifle has a correct and proper, rare and desirable, early 1942 Izhevsk "transitional early war" stock with the earlier style screwed in sling slot escutcheons in the rear sling slot and the early to mid war stamped and folded sheet metal "half-liner" in the front sling slot. All numbers are stamped matching with Cyrillic prefixes; no line-outs or electropenciling. It has number matching bayonet, and has a nice condition, correct and proper, early war, 1942 "ersatz/emergency pattern" canvas sling with the leather end straps with thong ties. Price for this one is $350 + shipping.


I also have correct, original, WW2 Soviet scope and mount setups available for the PU rifles. These scope and mount setups are not cheap, but the mounts and bases are arsenal correct (Tula or Izhevsk) for the rifles.

I also have a nice, unissued, post-war Soviet era (1981), mount and base for the PU sniper if anyone needs one for a restoration or re-scoping a scopeless sniper. It has the 2 locking screws in the base, but not the mounting screws or pins...these are available from Accumounts. I'm asking $125 + shipping for the mount and base.

backstrap
04-06-2013, 6:54 PM
I sold a 47 This week for $500 on gunbroker. I still have a laminated DDR ex I may sell. I'm not selling for under $300- I guess that's retail...

Marcus von W.
04-06-2013, 7:47 PM
That laminated DDR marked PU rifle is one of the rare and desirable ones, worth a lot more than $300.

deoxys987
04-06-2013, 7:56 PM
what would be fair price for izvesh ex sniper in very good condition?

thanks

Well I bought my 1943 Izhevsk Ex-Sniper for 99$ from Turners. depends on the condition, possibly if its in excellent condition you might be able to get $150-$175. depends if you have the original stock with the cutout for the scope mount.

small hole shooter
04-06-2013, 11:22 PM
Thanks for the info. I just this last week picked up an ex-sniper 1942 Izhevsk. It has the filled holes and proper marking. I don't think the stock is the original as it is not cut out where the scope mount would be. The numbers match the receiver however there is no "HC" in front of the numbers on the butt, bottom and bolt. I need to get the cosmoline off it and put some rounds through it. Bolt is very smooth with a tight lock up.

yatzee982
04-07-2013, 12:31 AM
I have a '37 Tula ex-PE sniper in a laminated stock that has all numbers matching serial. I wouldn't sell it for less then $350 ... and since I just picked up a all letters matching '44 Izhevsk M44 in a laminated stock today to make a set ... I don't think I would sell either for any amount :)

p.s. I picked up the '37 Tula ex-PE for $126 shipped to my doorstep in Jan '13 this year :)

Marcus von W.
04-07-2013, 1:29 PM
There are some deals out there on scarce, historic, and desirable ex-snipers if one is watchful and lucky. This is one of the reasons these weapons are so popular with collectors, both those who seek to restore them to original and most historically significant WW2 combat sniper configuration and those who prefer to leave them in as-is, de-snipered, configuration.

With some of the rarer rifles, unless you have a ton of money and some luck, restoring an ex-sniper is your only available and afffordable method of adding one of them to your collection.

It's interesting that you can pick up a genuine Ww2 Mosin sniper that probably saw combat from the gates of Moscow and sewers of Stalingrad to the flaming ruins of Berlin for less than you can buy the stock or bolt for a Soviet captured and refurbed Mauser.

I advise anyone with an interest in historical weapons, especially snipers, to actively seek out and acquire nice and reasonably priced examples of the more desirable ex-snipers. One day the supply of these will dry up or some hate-filled politico swine will shut off the import of them, more folks will wake up and wise up to what these really are, and demand and prices will far outpace supply.

Nice examples of desirable and restorable ex-snipers are definitely investment grade items with the potential for significant appreciation.

Geologyjohn
04-07-2013, 4:37 PM
Marcus, those are some insightful comments. Thanks for sharing your knowledge on these historic rifles. Do you have any thoughts on which is ammo to buy to achieve the most accurate results (short of loading your own) at the range? John

Marcus von W.
04-07-2013, 6:14 PM
Mosins, especially wartime production, sometimes tend to have some minor variation in bore size, so its more about finding what type of ammo works best in your particular rifle than which type is best in general. There can also be differences between different year lots of the same ammo from the same factory.

And not only do you have to consider the different nations that made this ammo - Soviet Union, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Romania, Yugoslavia, Albania, China, etc. - but there is also light and heavy ball ammo. So the best thing is to acquire rounds from different nations and different weights, and see which shoots best in your gun - or if you have more than one, in each different gun.

Also, you may find that different types of ammo give good accuracy in a rifle, but point of impact for each type may vary a little, so you need a "sniper's notebook" to record the scope settings for each type.

pitfighter
04-07-2013, 10:16 PM
All great notes - Marcus,

Thanks for sharing on these forums.

This thread may actually succeed in having me step away from Mausers, maybe just one Mosin sniper - historically they were certainly used by both sides (I limited myself to one nation's firearms in an effort to curb my spending - which it hasn't really.)

Sorry to the Op - enjoying your thread - carry on.

Cheers,

Pit.

http://i127.photobucket.com/albums/p140/figaro1971/sniper_zpse0530383.jpg

Marcus von W.
04-07-2013, 11:49 PM
The Mosin 91/30 can be considered a legitimate WW2 German sniper rifle due to the large numbers of them that were captured and used by German forces, much like British made Model 1852 Enfield rifles are a legitimate U.S. Civil War rifle that was used by both Union and Confederate troops.

Large numbers of Mosin snipers were used by Jaeger and Gebirgsjaeger units.

Even in 1944, half the sniper rifles in the 23rd Panzer Division were 91/30's.

The 43rd Sturm-Pionier Battalion, 11th Panzer Division, and a Sniper Training School on the Rhein were all completely outfitted with Mosin snipers.

The 19th Infantry Division used Mosin snipers at least until the end of 1944.

My grandfather, who was in the Gebirgsjaeger in Russia, used Mosin snipers when the need or opportunity arose, and was himself shot twice by Soviet snipers with Mosins - and survived both times!

A the father and uncle of friend of the family - one of the owners of Alpine Village in Torrance, who is an ethnic German from Croatia and also a relative of Tito - were Waffen SS snipers in Yugoslavia and also used Mosin snipers on occasion, although they much preferred the Mauser sniper.

Famous SS Sniper Josef "Sepp" Allberger used a Mosin sniper for most of his sniper career.

I have in my collection a WW2 German captured and used 1943 Izhevsk PU sniper with 1972 West German nitro proofs that was acquired from the German Army and brought to this country in that year by an American soldier stationed in Germany, and also a standard Mosin 91/30 that belonged to my grandfather in WW2 although I don't know if he had it when he was in the German Army or the Soviet "Czech Red Army".

89 Vision
04-08-2013, 2:51 AM
I have in my collection a WW2 German captured and used 1943 Izhevsk PU sniper with 1972 West German nitro proofs that was acquired from the German Army and brought to this country in that year by an American soldier stationed in Germany, and also a standard Mosin 91/30 that belonged to my grandfather in WW2 although I don't know if he had it when he was in the German Army or the Soviet "Czech Red Army".


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