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View Full Version : How many guys Dry Fire? (Sig 226 .... Yah or Nah?)


.40Cal
07-03-2012, 8:42 AM
Hey guys,

I've been reading that dry firing is the best way to stay in shape and in tune with your grip, tigger control, sight, etc.

So, the big question is: Can you dry fire a semi-auto (Sig P226, 9mm) without snap caps, or not ? How many people dry fire without anything in their guns ??!

Thanks in Advance!

soakedntorment
07-03-2012, 8:47 AM
I dry fire with snap caps, better safe then sorry.

BoJackUSMC
07-03-2012, 8:53 AM
In military we always dry fire without snap caps.

Brandon04GT
07-03-2012, 8:53 AM
I know you can dry fire a 1911 all you want and you'll be just fine as long as your FP spring isn't weak. With the XD I know it isn't really recommended because the striker impacts the retaining pin each time.

Legasat
07-03-2012, 8:55 AM
I usually use snap caps for a while when I get a new piece, but I don't keep up on it like I should...

QuarterBoreGunner
07-03-2012, 8:57 AM
Dry fire all you like; the debate over whether snap-caps are really necessary (outside of rimfire) is still on-going. It doesn't hurt anything to use them so why not?

The only real issue with snap-caps is it increases (however slightly) the chance of mistaking live rounds for snap-caps and ND into your TV set, etc. Yeah yeah I said 'slightly'.

bohoki
07-03-2012, 9:01 AM
a sig is safe to dryfire but dont go crazy why take a chance

.40Cal
07-03-2012, 9:03 AM
I know you can dry fire a 1911 all you want and you'll be just fine as long as your FP spring isn't weak. With the XD I know it isn't really recommended because the striker impacts the retaining pin each time.

I understand your point about stiker guns like XD/Glock. However, mine's a Sig 226. But appreciate your advice.

QuarterBoreGunner
07-03-2012, 9:03 AM
a sig is safe to dryfire but dont go crazy why take a chance

Well wait, is it safe or not?
Trick question, it's safe.

.40Cal
07-03-2012, 9:05 AM
a sig is safe to dryfire but dont go crazy why take a chance

Hummmmm.... How about I load in a spent (used) case? It would have no bullet, no gun powder, and the primer will be spent anyway. However, the firing pin would still hit against it, which would be safe "IF" it was a live round. So, theoratically, would it work?

QuarterBoreGunner
07-03-2012, 9:07 AM
^sure that will work, but again, you need to be extra cautious and not confuse a live round for your dummy round.

Or you could just make a DIY snap cap; there's plenty of tip on how online.

Laser Sailor
07-03-2012, 9:08 AM
Dry fire all you like; the debate over whether snap-caps are really necessary (outside of rimfire) is still on-going. It doesn't hurt anything to use them so why not?

The only real issue with snap-caps is it increases (however slightly) the chance of mistaking live rounds for snap-caps and ND into your TV set, etc. Yeah yeah I said 'slightly'.

I've been looking for a reason to get a new TV....

I do dry fire with snaps, not so much to protect the gun (though that is a factor) but mainly do I can do reload and malfunction drills.

QuarterBoreGunner
07-03-2012, 9:10 AM
I've been looking for a reason to get a new TV....

I do dry fire with snaps, not so much to protect the gun (though that is a factor) but mainly do I can do reload and malfunction drills.

Those are good reasons; that's why I like the A-zoom Snap Caps (http://www.azoomsnapcaps.com/home/) - I've had too many of the Pachmayr's break on me.

fullrearview
07-03-2012, 9:26 AM
For a sig, it is fine. If you are doing tens of thousands of them, I would replace the pins in the slide every year just to be safe.

It's extremely unlikely, but there have be cases where guys have done thousands a day which shattered the nurled (spelling???) old pins. The new roll pins should hold up as long as the rest of the gun.

IVth Horseman
07-03-2012, 9:28 AM
Yep, I dry fire without em. I figure worst case I have to replace a five dollar spring or pin and save hundreds on ammo.

The Virus
07-03-2012, 9:29 AM
Dude snap caps are 10 or 15 bucks. Just buy a pack.

Sig Marine
07-03-2012, 9:54 AM
Hey guys,

I've been reading that dry firing is the best way to stay in shape and in tune with your grip, tigger control, sight, etc.

So, the big question is: Can you dry fire a semi-auto (Sig P226, 9mm) without snap caps, or not ? How many people dry fire without anything in their guns ??!

Thanks in Advance!

Dry fire practice is an excellent way to practice trigger control, grip, etc.. This is also an excellent way to get proficient with the DA trigger your weapon. Doing this a few times will not hurt your weapon but continued hard practice could. If you intend on doing a significant amount of dry firing, one way to avoid damage to your firing pin is to use an "O" ring at the rear of the slide where the hammer contacts the firing pin. This actually prevents the hammer from striking the rear of the firing pin with enough force that damage is incurred. These are available from home centers and hardware stores in the plumbing section. Another way to accomplish this principle is using a foam ear plug instead of the "O" ring. Snap Caps also work but there have been reports of poor fit in the chamber and case heads getting chewed up over time.

Hope this helps...Sig Marine (Certified Sig Armorer)

http://i1110.photobucket.com/albums/h458/SigMarine/DryFireO-Ring.jpg

straykiller
07-03-2012, 11:21 AM
i dry fire my p226 all the time, although i do like the oring method posted above i may need to try that out

unusedusername
07-03-2012, 11:29 AM
Sig Marine:

Wow that's a great idea! I never though of sticking an O ring behind the firing pin...

USM0083
07-03-2012, 1:43 PM
My Sig armorer instructor said dry firing a Sig is fine.

My first P228 (dept. issue) had 25K rounds though it, plus at least 10K dry fire trigger pulls.

It was very loose, not quite as accurate, but utterly reliable.

My second P228 only had about 10K round through it, as I now carry a S&W M&P .45.

venturasurf
07-03-2012, 1:49 PM
So, the big question is: Can you dry fire a semi-auto (Sig P226, 9mm) without snap caps, or not ? How many people dry fire without anything in their guns ??!


If you check the FAQ on the SIG site it says that it is safe to dry fire their 220-line pistols, but then they say for repeated constant dry firing they recommend snap caps.

EDIT: Folks it's SIG, not Sig... as in "Schweizerische Industrie Gesellschaft".

INFAMOUS762X39
07-03-2012, 1:50 PM
Dry fire practice is an excellent way to practice trigger control, grip, etc.. This is also an excellent way to get proficient with the DA trigger your weapon. Doing this a few times will not hurt your weapon but continued hard practice could. If you intend on doing a significant amount of dry firing, one way to avoid damage to your firing pin is to use an "O" ring at the rear of the slide where the hammer contacts the firing pin. This actually prevents the hammer from striking the rear of the firing pin with enough force that damage is incurred. These are available from home centers and hardware stores in the plumbing section. Another way to accomplish this principle is using a foam ear plug instead of the "O" ring. Snap Caps also work but there have been reports of poor fit in the chamber and case heads getting chewed up over time.

Hope this helps...Sig Marine (Certified Sig Armorer)

http://i1110.photobucket.com/albums/h458/SigMarine/DryFireO-Ring.jpg

Thanks for the advice! I almost bought some snap caps to.

I am a Paintball Gun Tech and have quite an access to random o-rings like this. I found two that might work just fine, can't wait to try them out!

IBJanky
07-03-2012, 2:00 PM
I dry fire all the time, been doing it for years without any issues.

myke

Buddhabelly
07-03-2012, 2:15 PM
I dry fire all the time, been doing it for years without any issues.

myke

Dry firing can be VERY expensive. VERY !









I was dry firing one of my pistols one night by myself in the TV room while watching a ball game. My wife came in the room to get the ironing board. I put the gun down on the arm rest. She swung the ironing board out of the closet and knock the gun onto the floor by mistake. Dented the front sight.

$120 later, it shoots fine again.

waveslayer
07-03-2012, 2:23 PM
The best and only way to fine tune your skills is to dry fire practice. I have a Sig 226 and 228 that are over 10 years old, I practice all the time with them dry firing. You will be fine.

IPSICK
07-03-2012, 2:56 PM
The only POS I would not recommend dry firing without snap caps is an S&W M&P. Most modern centerfire pistols should be absolutely fine.

Riksk
07-03-2012, 3:19 PM
Little off forum, but how about dry firing an AR-10? I've read it's great practice, but am nervous about the possible damage.

Thanks

9mmepiphany
07-03-2012, 5:05 PM
I learned the O-ring trick over on Sigforum. You can also stick a foam ear plug in there...not as pretty but works the same.

I have seen guys split the retaining pins in their slide through dry fire practice...but these guys are dry firing 60k snaps a year

Bw511
07-03-2012, 5:50 PM
Haha, like Buddhabelly said, probably the biggest risk with dry firing is all the "out of the box" time your pistol spends. Had an unfortunate incident with a coffee cup whilst my 2010 "german" was sitting on the desk :(
http://img546.imageshack.us/img546/7989/img2012070300355.jpg

I use snap caps. Why worry? Saw a picture a while back of a Glock that had been dry-fired so much that the firing pin had started to bust its way out of the breechblock. Big difference between snapping the trigger a few times a day, and wearing your finger out a few times a day, I guess.

I like being able to cock the hammer, pull the slide back a hair and see that red annodized aluminum, more than anything.

Mossy Man
07-03-2012, 6:04 PM
dry firing centerfire pistols is fine

but you're still making moving parts move, so it just adds wear to the gun as you would normally by pulling the trigger

AeroEngi
07-03-2012, 6:10 PM
I dry-fire (without snap caps) my Sig P220 and P226 all the time and I haven't seen any issues.