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Centerfire Rifles - Manually Operated Lever action, bolt action or other non gas operated centerfire rifles.

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  #1  
Old 02-09-2014, 3:03 PM
Pax2525 Pax2525 is offline
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Default Buying New vs. Buying Old- Marlin 30-30

I've been pursuing the classifieds for awhile now and am looking for a Marlin 336. I see used ones come up but they aren't not much behind the price of a new one.

Is the quality of an older one (meaning 10 yrs +) so much better than a new one? Am I missing something? Im not opposed to a used gun especially some of the clean ones on here but saving only $50 isn't worth buying a used one, especially if I have to drive out of my local area.

Whatcha think Calguns?

Thanks
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  #2  
Old 02-09-2014, 3:13 PM
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ptgarcia ptgarcia is offline
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I'd buy old over new if given the opportunity. One with the JM proof mark is preferable over the Remington made guns with REM proof mark. That being said I have a 336 made by Remington and it's a fine gun devoid of issues.

Paul
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Old 02-09-2014, 3:37 PM
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If you want resale value, the JM proofmark is going to be worth more.

If you just want to shoot it, you'll have to handle it to make sure it actually cycles, and perhaps do some minor finishing and smoothing out.

I've got 2 JM Marlins and one Rem. My favorite is one of the JMs, but that's because of caliber rather than the stamp.
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Old 02-09-2014, 4:55 PM
skohl skohl is offline
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I bought a remington built 30-30 2 years ago and am very happy with it. Action was stiff to begin with but is very smooth now. This rifle is extremely accurate. I use furniture polish on the stock every 6 months and it looks great. Buy one, you will really enjoy it!
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Old 02-09-2014, 10:08 PM
Excaliburr Excaliburr is offline
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The reason to buy good used guns sometimes can be resale value. Some people appreciate the older guns and how they were made vs todays stamped out pieces. Some of us have Winchesters that were $10-$15 when they were originally bought, but now they are worth double what a Marlin is worth. It isn't all collector value, but the fact that the American $ has lost much of its buying power. I mean an ounce of gold you cannot eat or use much personally except for bling, and there isn't any more or less on the earth today than there was before, but it used to be $20/oz vs $1200 or more today. It basically has the same buying power and the Marlin has the same abilities it has when it was purchased, as long as it was taken care of properly. You biggest issue may be finding the ammo as 30-30 seems a little more difficult to get in my area at least. Good thiing I reload! Plus when you do find it, it is basically $1 per round......which is crazy imo. I reload mine with cast lead which shoot great and the rifle was originally intended for anyway and it is nothing to go through 100 rounds plinking at targets all over the range, especially when they are loaded a bit light.
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  #6  
Old 02-14-2014, 8:26 AM
T O Double D T O Double D is offline
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I bought a Remlin 336 three years ago. At that point all I'd ever heard was good about Marlins and hadn't heard any mention of them being bought by Remington. I was also newish to guns in general. (I've owned a .22 rifle for ten years and plink with it when I go camping, but that's it.) I took my brand new 336 out to the range and on the fourth shot I ejected the case and it was sheared in half with the front half still lodged in the barrel. I brought the gun to a gunsmith and he said it was the headspacing being incorrect. He also pointed out how badly the wood to metal fit of the stock was. (Something I had noticed, but didn't think much of since I was new and had only heard good about Marlin) Anyway, long story short I began researching Remlins and found this section of MarlinOwners.com. Remington screwed up so bad with Marlin they actually halted production for a bit. I guess the newer ones are better now, but I will never buy a Remington made gun again. I'll stick to older Marlin and Savage. (I bought a Savage 110 along with my 336 and it's awesome!)
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Old 02-14-2014, 9:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T O Double D View Post
I bought a Remlin 336 three years ago. At that point all I'd ever heard was good about Marlins and hadn't heard any mention of them being bought by Remington. I was also newish to guns in general. (I've owned a .22 rifle for ten years and plink with it when I go camping, but that's it.) I took my brand new 336 out to the range and on the fourth shot I ejected the case and it was sheared in half with the front half still lodged in the barrel. I brought the gun to a gunsmith and he said it was the headspacing being incorrect. He also pointed out how badly the wood to metal fit of the stock was. (Something I had noticed, but didn't think much of since I was new and had only heard good about Marlin) Anyway, long story short I began researching Remlins and found this section of MarlinOwners.com. Remington screwed up so bad with Marlin they actually halted production for a bit. I guess the newer ones are better now, but I will never buy a Remington made gun again. I'll stick to older Marlin and Savage. (I bought a Savage 110 along with my 336 and it's awesome!)
What did you do about the incorrect head spacing?
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Old 02-14-2014, 9:18 AM
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Yeah, follow the link TO gave, but remember, Marlin owners are VERY prejudiced against Marlins since Remington took them over. I own 2 older 336's in 30-30 cal. and am dang happy with them, no failures, always accurate. Successful hunting trips with both, altho I keep my shots under 100 yds.
Guess the problem with the new ones is Remington brought in their own armourers and let the Marlin guys go, can't expect them to be well versed in some other manufacturers firearm.
Older Marlins rock! IMO.
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Old 02-14-2014, 11:05 PM
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SBsasquatch SBsasquatch is offline
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Got my Remlin in Dec 2013. Yes it was stiff and gritty; but I expected that. I took it apart, cleaned it thoroughly. Not that bad now. Only part that needs tuning is the initial lock-up of the lever/action. It kinda hangs up. I know how to fix it but I'd rather it be that way for field use. The fit and finish is a little rough; but for me it's a working gun and will probably never see a bench ever. Purchase was meant to replace my beautiful black& tan ar15 that I was using to chase coyotes. Also I was hoping on filling some tags this year. All I need is the right tool for the job.

My new Marlington 336

Makes me feel like Chuck Connors when it's in my hands.lol
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Old 02-15-2014, 11:29 AM
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Dutch Henry Dutch Henry is offline
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If you know what to look for when shopping for a used rifle, then you can probably save a lot of money. Most of the time, if the rifle exterior looks good (no rust or gouged wood, or buggered up screws) it may be assumed that the owner has taken good care of it. A cursory check of the muzzle, rifling and the internals; firing pin, extractor, ejector, magazine and cartridge carrier should be in order and cycling a dummy round or two might not be a bad idea, either.

Most hunting rifles are never shot very much and a used gun can be a good value. I've bought several over many years and I still have fun shooting them.

All of that said, if you buy a new rifle, it will probably cost you more but you have a factory warranty in the event something goes wrong.

Last edited by Dutch Henry; 02-15-2014 at 11:33 AM..
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  #11  
Old 02-15-2014, 7:32 PM
Jesus805 Jesus805 is offline
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It's tuff try to sell
I have the 336a with the jm stamped and it's been hard to sell for $375
What are people willing to pay ??
$200??
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Old 02-16-2014, 5:46 PM
SMarquez SMarquez is offline
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I have a made in 1973 Marlin that looks like hell but has an amazingly smooth and light, crisp trigger break. You won't get that out of the box from a NIB model now.
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Old 02-24-2014, 12:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesus805 View Post
It's tuff try to sell
I have the 336a with the jm stamped and it's been hard to sell for $375
What are people willing to pay ??
$200??
Probably hard to sell because it's hard to find 30-30.
I was looking at a 336 youth rifle several months back that, I would love to own but nobody had ammo for it.
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Old 02-24-2014, 12:40 PM
Jesus805 Jesus805 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UberPatriot View Post
Probably hard to sell because it's hard to find 30-30.
I was looking at a 336 youth rifle several months back that, I would love to own but nobody had ammo for it.
Hummmm
That's weird
I always find some here around town in Santa Barbara
Going for about $20 bucks
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  #15  
Old 02-24-2014, 5:56 PM
T O Double D T O Double D is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMB 1 View Post
What did you do about the incorrect head spacing?
Sent back to Remington. It took months, plus their smiths were not pleasant to deal with, but it now works and the stock fits correctly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UberPatriot View Post
Probably hard to sell because it's hard to find 30-30.
I was looking at a 336 youth rifle several months back that, I would love to own but nobody had ammo for it.
Yep. 30-30 is hard enough to find, but mine is used for hunting in the Condor zone. Lead free ammo must be used and that's all but nonexistent.

Last edited by T O Double D; 02-24-2014 at 5:58 PM..
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