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  #1  
Old 08-08-2013, 1:09 PM
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Default High Compressed Ready Position?!



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Personal Defense Tips: Firearms Training - The High Compressed Ready Position is when we bring the gun back from extension into the high center chest. Elbows are tight to the sides and the gun is above the holster and below the line of sight. Alessandro Padovani discusses the advantages of this position. It's consistent with presentation from the holster. It's intuitive, a natural and strong position from which we can easily apply fine motor skills. And the gun is easier to control in High Compressed Ready.
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Old 08-08-2013, 1:38 PM
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Paul Gomez pretty much says all that needs to be said. He discusses the High Compressed position at about 2:05:




I'm not a fan of manipulations, reloads and malfunction clearances from the High Compressed position, BTW. You can make it work with a bit of practice, but is seems to take far more practice than simply using the "work space" position taught by most.
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Old 08-08-2013, 1:50 PM
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I'm not a fan of manipulations, reloads and malfunction clearances from the High Compressed position, BTW.
Yes, the problem is when they try to make it an end all!
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Old 08-08-2013, 2:04 PM
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Yes, the problem is when they try to make it an end all!
Agreed. I appreciate the idea of trying to identify the smallest subset of skills which cover the widest set of circumstances. That's sound training philosophy. This does seem to be a case where that principle was/is over-applied, or where it makes more sense to learn 2 things instead of one.

I've seen this fall apart in FoF training scenarios. Say what you like about James Yeager, but his quote regarding people being like "dogs going after a Frisbee" seems apt. Unless you've done a helluva lot of training and practice, you'll LOOK at the gun when it messes up or goes empty.

At that point, looking DOWN to a gun at High Compressed Ready is not a good thing. Regardless of where one stands on the topic of looking at the magwell or looking at the threat, it just makes sense to have the gun in a position where you can do either effectively, or transition at will from one to the other most quickly.
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Old 08-08-2013, 6:30 PM
Sofatactical Sofatactical is offline
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Hi compressed ready followed by obligatory robotic head turning. It reminds me of this:
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Old 08-08-2013, 6:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Sofatactical View Post
... followed by obligatory robotic head turning.
Be fair. I know that Alessandro does not teach the scan-n-assess as a rote movement. It may appear so in a video which is about something else entirely, but it is indeed taught as an opportunity to actively look around and see what's up.
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Old 08-11-2013, 8:45 PM
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Originally Posted by ramzar View Post
That guy needs to get some instruction to fix his bad posture. As for ready positions, I think low ready and high ready both have their places depending on the situation. I don't see a legitimate use for the "High Compressed ready."


Why did he put his hands up in front of his face immediately before his draw?
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Old 08-11-2013, 8:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Jack's Smirking Revenge View Post
That guy needs to get some instruction to fix his bad posture. As for ready positions, I think low ready and high ready both have their places depending on the situation. I don't see a legitimate use for the "High Compressed ready."


Why did he put his hands up in front of his face immediately before his draw?
You mean the Quasimodo stance?

Remember CFS/PDN:

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Old 08-11-2013, 9:02 PM
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Originally Posted by PDN View Post
Personal Defense Tips: Firearms Training - The High Compressed Ready Position is when we bring the gun back from extension into the high center chest. Elbows are tight to the sides and the gun is above the holster and below the line of sight. Alessandro Padovani discusses the advantages of this position. It's consistent with presentation from the holster. It's intuitive, a natural and strong position from which we can easily apply fine motor skills. And the gun is easier to control in High Compressed Ready.
Sorry, I don't agree. There is only one need for high compressed ready and that is your part of a team and you are currently stacked and ready to enter.


I have yet to see any reason for a high compressed ready by anyone.

Things to do in this state?

Reloads - NO
Malfunction clear - NO
Post assessment - Maybe


The dwell time from extended to compressed ready back to extended and on target is time NOT well spent.

These are my opinions and mine alone. YMMV
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Old 08-11-2013, 9:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Jack's Smirking Revenge View Post
... Why did he put his hands up in front of his face immediately before his draw?
To explain it without necessarily agreeing about whether it's good/bad/best/worst/meh, CFS techniques are heavily biased towards a couple of concepts:
  1. The "flinch" or "body alarm" response.
  2. Emphasis on close-quarters incidents.

So, what you are seeing is a modified form of the "fence" technique taught by many combatives instructors, integrated into the draw. It simply acknowledges that most people will throw their hands up to some degree when startled, and bend their knees.

Not sure yet what I think of it personally, but it's not without some logic.
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Old 08-11-2013, 9:30 PM
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There is only one need for high compressed ready and that is your part of a team and you are currently stacked and ready to enter.
It seems like an awful technique to use in a stack, as you'd be pointing AT the back of someone stacked in front of you. SUL or "workspace high" seem better ideas. Are we talking about two different techniques?

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I have yet to see any reason for a high compressed ready by anyone.
Well, Gomez explained a few in the video I linked. You may not think they are good reasons, but they are reasons nonetheless, lol.
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Last edited by ZombieTactics; 08-11-2013 at 9:57 PM..
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Old 08-12-2013, 9:52 AM
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You could take out the word "high compressed ready" and insert "high ready" and the video wouldn't miss a beat. But to be honest I really stopped caring after The Pincus Banzai .
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Old 08-12-2013, 12:53 PM
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Anything involving CFS is tried and true.
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Old 08-13-2013, 10:20 AM
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Anything involving CFS is tried and true.
Arguably not in all cases, lol. Nonetheless, it's certainly a cut above the "we teach stuff from a 20-year-old military manual" approach.
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Old 08-15-2013, 12:52 AM
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High compressed ready has some use but it is not explained well in the first video.

I agree with Gomez that the primary advantage is close quarters where physical leverage is more important than shooting with max accuracy. Gomez does a great job explaining the limited application of shooting from that position.

I prefer using my off hand to strike / deflect / gouge if I have to shoot from a compressed position.

Not a huge fan of muzzle up but I also agree that it's best when you're on the move or in a group. Use what works.

A few pedantic words on manipulations: You don't do reloads and slide racks from high compressed, you do them in the workspace. The difference is subtle but significant. If you try and do a reload from compressed in cqc I am going to take your gun away and hit you with it. I don't know why he even mentions it.

Your priority must be to defend yourself, control the fight, then create space in which to operate. If you can't do the first two then you can't do the third part and you're in big trouble.

One man's opinion. You do what serves you.

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