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Curio & Relic Gallery Post pictures of your favorite milsurp here.

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  #1  
Old 06-26-2013, 10:32 PM
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Default Some old German pistol.



This beauty came from a seller on this site - it is a Prussian Cavalry pistol, it is photographed with an Austro Hungarian saber and portapee also from the 1860's.
The serial number is matched on every screw head and part.
Each piece is marked with King Fredrich Welhelm IV 'FW' acceptance stamps.
The inner lock working is numbered and proofed and the springs still show their heat treating color.
It sports a 15mm smooth-bore - cannon style barrel.



The barrel date on this is 1868 -
Worth noting this was also the year Hiram Maxim completed his first working recoil operated machine gun.
It was also only five years before the Colt Peacemaker.

Technology had advanced such that this single shot horse pistol must have made the owner feel quite left behind.
Thankfully it's huge and would put a serious crease in someone's skull it you needed to use it as a club.

Now for something a little different...

This is an English boot pistol that I found on Craigslist - by contrast it is very elegant and finely made, lightweight and extraordinarily delicate.
It would have been one of a pair originally and likely light enough not to disturb the hang of your tunic.
It is one of my favorites.

*It is shown on an MG15 DOPPELTROMMEL coaxial magazine, used in aircraft (and later on the ground) it held 75 8mm rounds and would load alternating from left and right so as to not throw off the balance and aim of the firearm as it fired. It required a complicated loader and takes a while to load. They would often have a box with five or six preloaded double drums available on a plane.
The powder flask says 1776 but was likely much later and just a curio.


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Last edited by pitfighter; 06-26-2013 at 11:22 PM..
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Old 06-26-2013, 10:56 PM
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This is an old front heavy G41 duv.
This was produced in 1943 so there was no need for the "W" distinction, as Walther had by this time, thoroughly outshone the Mauser G41, the "M."
Which was over engineered and really didn't work terribly well.

A little history:
The government offered a very precisely worded spec to Mauser and Walther.
They both produced G41 rifles.
The G41(W) and the G41(M)
Mauser followed the spec to the word, and consequently made a poor rifle.
Walther ignored some of the problematic elements of the spec, and made a satisfactory rifle.

By 1943, the G43 was being issued, so the pictured G41 duv was an anachronism.

*Pic shown against the background of some K98 bayonets of various years and manufacture.

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Old 06-26-2013, 11:08 PM
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Here is a pic of the Mauser G41 - the G41(m)
Serial #2500 -
#The bolt is in the upright position, because I missed that detail when snapping the pic - I kept it in a foam-lined storage container with the bolt upright.

It used a bolt action to load it, and then operated as a semi automatic.
The inner and outer bolt being two main parts (in actuality about a 100 parts, lol.)

Theoretically you could then use the bolt action if it jammed - in my experience with it, the jams were related to the bolt group, so the bolt action, was not an option.

This was also a Calguns buy, as a matching mechanism, that I managed to find an original stock and stock-parts for.

It is not an elegant firearm. I am set for G41's. I am a lot more enamored of the G and K 43 series.

BTW - the Swedish engineer who designed the gas-trap system you see at the muzzle end of these two rifles was actually called Bang, Søren Bang.
His system catches the muzzle exhaust, and uses it to push a doughnut washer down over the barrel, that in turn slams into a system of rods that run inside the stock, to the front of the bolt, the system only moves an inch or so but the violent inertia sends the bolt the required distance, necessary to eject and cycle.



*Everything else in the pic is a dummy or a Jap replica.... Except for the all matching G43 AC.
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Last edited by pitfighter; 06-26-2013 at 11:15 PM..
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Old 06-27-2013, 9:26 AM
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Very interesting information Pit. Thank your for sharing. I especially like the G41. To my understanding, these rifles are quite rare, and your #2500 S/N is equally unique. German firearms fascinate me the most, but sadly, my collection only contains one K98k Mauser.
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Old 06-27-2013, 11:38 AM
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Yes, the G41's are rare, the G41(m) is not worth what it sells for as a rifle, in my opinion, lol, as a rarity I suppose it is interesting as a historical artifact and this translates to value.
Many ended up being pitched into the void by disappointed owners, which adds to their rarity.
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Old 07-02-2013, 5:50 PM
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Here is my new camera dolly - it is not exactly a C&R but it is WW2 era.

It is kinda heavy and awkward, but it is very smooth, and moves fluidly once it starts rolling.

Do think we should consider marketing it?

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Last edited by pitfighter; 07-02-2013 at 6:24 PM..
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Old 07-02-2013, 6:20 PM
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I am envious of your camera dolly.... I love using vintage film accessories with modern cameras... it creates a unique feel to the camera motion
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Old 07-02-2013, 6:28 PM
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Yes - we were using 1960's and 70's vintage lenses on the Sony - they do affect the image, you have to pay attention, but that shallow depth of field is lovely.

We didn't really use the AA gun, it was a part of the museum and they wouldn't let me move it, lol.
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