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  #1  
Old 02-02-2013, 9:42 AM
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Default The Steyr M95 - CGN compiled knowledge.

I got to talking with a guy at work the other day. He says he has a Steyr M95 he wants to unload for cheap. He has a few rounds of ammo as well. I don't know anything about them, but I got first dibs from him.

Should I pick it up?
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Old 02-02-2013, 10:57 AM
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Make sure you have an orthopedic surgeon on retainer! The carbines have an amazingly brutal recoil.
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:08 AM
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The Steyr M95 is an interesting firearm. The straight pull bolt action is a better design than the Swiss Schmidt-Rubin except for it's evil and hateful bolt head. If you ever take the bolt out of the rifle without the proper and necessary little spacer clip that keeps the bolt head from snapping back and retracting faster than watching Barbara Boxer and Hillery Clinton having hot naked lesbian sex will make you lose a woody, you will understand what I am saying.

Ammo is out there but not easy to find and not cheap. There is WW2 era German, Austrian, Bulgarian, and Hungarian - this is collector item stuff that will cost you around a buck a round when/if you find it.... although that actually isn't that expensive any more, going by what I see boxes of even common modern rifle ammo going for these days. But that's o.k., it's not a gun you will want to shoot a lot. Recoil is fierce, especially with the little carbines - it's not a real user friendly bangstick.

Most of these were made by Steyr in Austria for Austrian forces in the Austro-Hungarian dual monarchy and will have the little double-head Austrian imperial eagle marking. Some Austrian made ones were made for the Hungarian forces and have the Steyr marking but Hungarian shield and crown emblem. These are less common and a little more desirable. The other factory that made these was FEG in Budapest. These are scarcer than the Austrian Steyr made ones. Some Budapest made M95's went to Hungarian forces and have the Hungarian shield and crown marking, others went to Austrians and have the double eagle.

Bulgaria was a big purchaser of this model in the pre-Ww1 era, and some can be found with the Bulgarian lion crest on the side of the receiver, which adds collectability. Likewise, many were used by Czechoslovakia right after WW1 and will have small Czech lions and markings on the receiver and various parts - you gotta look hard and careful to see them, but they do add quite a bit of collectability.

There are 2 calibers for these, the original Ww1 Austrian 8X50r and the 1930's era Austrian 8X56r that was also adopted by Hungary. Unaltered 8x50r versions are a lot scarcer and more desirable, but ammo is waaaay more difficult to find and pricey, pricey, pricey! Besides the long rifles (these are scarce and in general worth more than the average carbine. There are 3 carbine variations - 2 original ones, the Stutzen and the carbine, which are differentiated by the original stocks, swivels, and presence or absence of a bayonet lug. There are also carbines made by the Austrians and Hungarians in the 1930's by cutting down rifles - these will have the longer rifle rear sight and the front sight blade will be mounted on a band on the barrel instead of directly on the barrel like an original carbine. Of course, over the years and multiple refurbs, the stocks tend to get switched around, so you can find cut down rifle stocks one real carbines, and carbine or stutzen stocks on other models. Also, carbine stocks have had swivels added and stutzen stocks have had them removed from the bottom of the butt and the hole patched, so it's not a big deal. But it is nice when you encounter one that does have the correct style stock.

Some of the ones that remained in Austria after WW1 were rebarreld in Vienna in the 1930's. These will have an Austrian federal eagle instead of an imperial eagle on the barrel over the chamber, with 1930's dates. I find these particularly interesting and collectable in good shape, because you KNOW that in 1938 they became German rifles.

Most of the M95's you encounter these days come from Bulgaria. The Bulgarians must have been not only poor but also not too bright, because they really liked these rifles and continued to grab them up after Ww2 when they were real cheap and nobody else wanted them. Much of my family is Bulgarian, so this is not hate on Bulgarian people and don't anyone try to turn it into such.

Italy also used a number of them acquired as WW1 booty and these will sometimes have Italian East Africa markings stamped on the stock. They are desirable. Many also were used in the Balkans, large portions of which were either under Austrian control or at war with Austria in WW1.

M95's often have rather dark, worn, and/or pitted bores. It's common enough that it's not a deal breaker, especially since it's not a rifle you want to shoot a lot anyhow. Nice clean bores are definitely a plus. Earlier imports with small, discrete import marks are a little more desirable than later ones with rough as a cheese grater "billboard" import marks.

If you can pick the gun and ammo up in the $100 range, you won't get hurt.

If it has been sporterized or dicked-with in any way, value drops to about half of that.

If you get it, post photos here and we will tell you more about it.
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:58 AM
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^^ Marcus gave you a good basic run down, and saved my fingers from typing out my own response.
Especially the line about the Boxer/Clinton bolt-head analogy. lol Which ironically, can be nullified for the mere cost of a dime.

I've been a strict collector of the 1895 M.95 straight-pull Mannlicher for about 15 years now. Having examples in the collection of some the very early first Repetier-Stutzen produced, to original Repetier-KarabinerStutzen, Repetier-Karabiner, Repetier-Karabiner mit Stutzenring, Repetier-StutzenKarabiner and Long rifles all in 8x50mmR. With variants of Bulgarian contract, (Bulgaria never actually produced the M.95 themselves. In the early 1900's, they were Austrian made rifles under contract for Bulgaria and stamped with the Bulgarian crest) Italian, Polish and Czech accepted pieces, to post-war 8x56mmR Austrian M.95/30's, Hungarian converted 31.M's and both as M.95/34 Bulgarain referbs, to the Yugoslavian M.95M, M.95/24 7.92mm (8x57) conversions.

Among others, I also have a 1913 accepted, Budapest produced M.95 KarabinerStutzen that was then sent to Italian East Africa (marked with the AOI on the stock) then later most likely went to Somalia or Etheopia, and THEN ended up as a captured piece in an Arabic nation which then received it's own Arabic serial number on the receiver. Through it's LONG journey, it has remained all original, non-import, correctly matched and still remains in 8x50mmR. There is a rich history in many of these rifles.

While this site has some small basic info errors, it's still a good reference and will help give you a visual at least of the M.95.

http://www.hungariae.com/Mann95.htm
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Old 02-02-2013, 1:13 PM
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more of a question for Markus... arent most 8x56?

ie, you see the carbines at gunstores for 100 bucks or so... these have been passed around from all over ended up in Bulgaria before being sold here to surplus nerds like us, these tend to be 8x56 right, isnt that the more commonly encountered variant?
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Old 02-02-2013, 1:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glennsche View Post
more of a question for Markus... arent most 8x56?

ie, you see the carbines at gunstores for 100 bucks or so... these have been passed around from all over ended up in Bulgaria before being sold here to surplus nerds like us, these tend to be 8x56 right, isnt that the more commonly encountered variant?
I know you directed the question to Marcus, but since I'm here.. Yes, most M.95's out there were converted from 8x50mmR (M.93 O-Patrone) to the 8x56mmR (M.30 S-Patrone) in the 1930's. Which then changed the designation from the M.95 to M.95/30 (or in the case of Hungarian 8x56mmR conversions, the 31.M, beginning in 1931). Bulgaria obtained most all of the M.95/30's and 31.M after this time-frame and refurb them, having their own designation of M.95/34 which are most of what you encounter in today's market.
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Old 02-02-2013, 1:36 PM
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Yes, most of them - especially the imports from Bulgaria (which started showing up in the mid 1980's) are 8x56r. However, original ones in 8X50r show up for sale once in a while. Long rifles in 8X50r are more common than carbine length ones - a lot of these were used as non-firing trainers and were imported in the mid 1980's from Europe....these often have the firing pin clipped, the bolt face welded up, and a big visible hole cut in the top of the chamber. However, others are intact and unmolested and are in firing condition.
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Old 02-02-2013, 1:43 PM
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Adding to what Goex said, they are an interesting rifle with lots of history and if you know a little about them you can find some scarce and historical variations at very affordable prices.

The 8X50r ammo has always been exceedingly difficult to find. The 56r ammo was also about non-existant until the mid-1980's when cases of Ww2 German ammo came on the market. This is good, clean stuff made by Rottweil in 1938 or 1939 (I forget which - I had a pile of this that I sold off recently) with little Nazi Hitler-chicken markings on the box, clips, and ammo. It came in original grey-green painted wooden chests with German markings and Nazi eagles. Even the chests are rather collectable these days.

About the 5 round clips - you need one of these little Mannlicher monstrosities (unless you have one of the Yugo 8mm Mauser converted rifles), or you have a very slow and clumsy single shot rifle.
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Old 02-02-2013, 1:48 PM
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^^ And to add further to that,

The surplus 8x56mmR you see that some call "Nazi" ammo was actually all produced by the Austrians after the German/Austrian Anschluss of 1938.

Also as mentioned about the clips, one should also be aware that if you don't have a clip to feed from and close the bolt on a chambered rimmed cartridge case, you have good chance of breaking your extractor as it tries to ride over the rim on closing. M.95 extractors are hard to find loose in their own. Not to mention, M.95M or M.95/24 modified and thinner extractors for the rimless 7.92 are just about impossible to find. M.95M and M.95/24's have an internal fixed clip in the magazine that holds the cartridges, but they are often missing which makes them into a single shot and also prone to extractor breakage. Always use a clip while shooting your M.95's.

Here's one of my M.95M's showing the "fixed" internal clip, (that differs very much from an M.95 clip) which like their extractors, are not available anywhere. One can also note of the hand full of modifications to the M.95M and M.95/24, is the channel milled out and thumb-relief in the receiver for use of 7.92 stripper clips.





Note the "hook" on the original clip lock/release has been cut off as it's no longer needed for the internal "fixed" clip.
As well as the magazine's clip drop hole has been sealed closed.









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Old 02-02-2013, 5:57 PM
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buy Privi partisan brass at midway or graf & Sons, Lee dies, and the lee .329-205 grain bullet mold/lee liquid alox lube, and shoot 15-17 grains of Alient 2400 and your shoulder will thank you
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Old 02-03-2013, 8:32 AM
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Thank you Marcus and Goex! I now have an idea what I'll be looking at along with some history of the rifle.

I'll report my findings when I see the rifle.

Thanks again.
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Old 02-03-2013, 2:19 PM
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I think there are some other points I should also add to all of our other gibberish.

For now, since there are a lot of variations one will encounter, like Czech made BRNO M.95's, Polish reworks..etc. I'll touch only on what are the most common encounters of the Österreichisch-Ungarische (Austro-Hungarian) M.95.

When you're looking at the M1895 straight-pull Mannlicher, be it an M.95, M.95/30, 31.M or M.95/34, there are some basic points to keep in mind so that you know what it is you're actually looking at.

I know I'm going to repeat myself as I mentioned some stuff before and in addition to some of Marcus' good info...but just to condense it all, we'll start with what the difference is in why it's an M.95, M.95/30, 31.M or M.95/34.

M.95 - These will be original un-converted, un-refurbished pieces that are still chambered in the original WWI 8X50mmR or "M.93 O-Patrone" cartridge. A correctly matched M.95 will only be serialized on the receiver, bbl, LEFT side of the butt-stock and often on the top hand-guard under the rear ladder leaf sight with the last two digits of the serial. Bolts were not serialized. Original M.95 8x50mmR rear ladder sights were graduated to 500-2400 schritt (or "steps").

M.95/30 - Austrian converted beginning in 1930 to the 8x56mmR, or "M.30 S-Patrone" cartridge. This Austrian conversion is noted by a large "S" stamped on the top of the chamber ring on the barrel, which stands for "Spitzgeschoss" or quite literally "Pointed Bullet". M.95/30's also received a taller front sight and a new rear ladder sight graduated to 300-2000 meters to compensate for the new and more powerful M.30 (8x56mmR) cartridge.

31.M Puska - This was the Hungarian's re-designation of their newly converted M.95 to 8x56mmR. Which the adoption of the new 8x56mmR for the Hungarians began in 1931. Hungarian converted 31.M will be stamped with a large "H" on top of the barrel/chamber ring, much like in the same manner of the Austrian "S" stamp. This "H" stamp stands for "Hegyes Tolteny", also quite literally translates to "Pointed Bullet".

M.95/34 - The M.95/34 are all the M.95/30 and 31.M 8x56mmR conversions..etc that were sent to Bulgaria after WWI from Austria and Hungary in addition to all of the Bulgarian M.95 contract rifles that remained in Bulgaria and went through the 1930's Bulgarian refurbishment and rebuild process. No where else was this designation of "M.95/34" used but from Bulgaria and is found in Bulgarian manuals of the time. Part of this rebuild, the Bulgarian's re-stamped numbers on M.95/30, 31.M parts such as bands, stocks, barrels and or the receivers. Bolts were also commonly electro-penciled to match. So, whenever you encounter stamped bands, stamped or electro-penciled bolts or serial numbers on the RIGHT side of the Butt-stock...etc, these are all signs of the Bulgarian post-war ownership and the M.95/34 rebuild.

Alright, clear so far?

Now, onto the basic configurations of the M.95.

First, is the Repetier-Karabiner: or "Carbine". This configuration will have a set of sling swivels mounted on the side only. One side swivel on the lower band, and one side swivel in the wrist. There is also a 7" distance between upper and lower bbl bands. Original M.95 Repetier-Karabiner upper bands had no bayonet lug or stacking rod. Original lug-less/rod-less Karabiner bands are VERY scarce. Later, Karabiner upper bands received a bayonet lug, literally welding or braising on a lug to the band. These lugged Karabiner bands are also quite uncommon to find, as just prior to WWI, most rifles were fitted and updated with Stuzten upper bands that had stacking rods and bayonet lugs.

Next we have is the Repetier-Stutzen:
This configuration will have a set of sling swivels mounted on the bottom side only. One bottom swivel on the lower band, and one bottom swivel on the butt-stock. There is a 5" distance between upper and lower bbl bands. Original M.95 Repetier-Stutzen upper bands all had stacking rods and bayonet lugs.

Next, is the Repetier-KarabinerStutzen:
This configuration will have 3 sets of sling swivels as well as side sling-bar. One bottom swivel on the lower band as well as a fixed side sling-bar. One side swivel in the wrist and a bottom swivel on the butt-stock. There is a also a 5" distance between upper and lower bbl bands. Repetier-KarabinerStutzen also have the Stutzen upper band with stacking rods and bayonet lugs.

Now, the Repetier-StutzenKarabiner:
This configuration is just like a Repetier-Karabiner Stutzen, having with 5" between bands. But rather than a fixed side-bar lower band, it will carry side & bottom swivels on lower band band, a side swivel in the wrist and a bottom swivel on butt-stock. This will also carry a Stutzen lugged and stacking rod upper band.

And finally, the Repetierkarabiner mit Stutzenring:
This configuration is simply a Repetier-Karabiner having 7" between bands with a side swivel on the lower band, side swivel in the wrist and fitted with a Stutzen lugged/stacking rod upper band.

Clear as mud? I know it's a lot to take in but I promise I'm almost done.

Long rifles and cut downs:
It's quite obvious when you encounter a long rifle, so I'll touch briefly on how to spot a cut-down long rifle. Note, that just about ALL Repetier-Stutzen, Repetier-KarabinerStutzen, Repetier-Karabiner, Repetier-Karabiner mit Stutzenring, and Repetier-StutzenKarabiner had short ladder rear leaf sights and wedged mounted front sights. The tell-tail signs of a cut-down long rifle will be a short rifle bearing long ladder leaf sights and a banded front sight. Also note that sometime during a rebuild, a short Karabiner/Stutzen type was re-barreled with a long rifle barrel bearing a banded front sight. A quick check of the serial number on the receiver and barrel will determine this if they match, not just along with the same number, but also same style of font. As noted before, the Bulgarians would commonly scrub the non-matching number and force-match barrels on their M.95/34 rebuilds and it's obvious when the number fonts don't match the original receiver numbers.

Now, one might ask "My short rifle has a long rifle banded front sight, but the rear ladder sight is short...what gives?"

There are two possible scenarios to this -
1.) It has been made from a cut-down long rifle, and during its modification to a short rifle, it was fitted with a short ladder rear sight.
2.) During WWI, to speed up barrel production for carbines, banded long rifle front sights (as opposed to the dovetailed/wedge mounted carbine sights) were also known to have been used on some new carbine barrels.
So it doesn't necessarily always mean that a particular short rifle with a banded front rifle sight, bearing also a short ladder rear sight was made from a long rifle.

Nevertheless, IMO, that doesn't affect the beauty of these rifles.

Receiver markings and part letters.
STEYR marked receivers are pieces made in Austria.
Parts you find that are stamped with the letter "K" are all Austrian made.
Austrian acceptance stamps on top of the bbl/chamber-ring will bear the stamp of W-n (Austrian eagle) and the last two digits of the year of that specific rifle's acceptance.
The "W-n" stamp stands for Wiener-Neustadt located south of Vienna in the state of Lower in North-East Austria.

BUDAPEST marked receivers are pieces made in Budapest, Hungary.
Parts you find that are stamped with the letter "R" are all Hungarian made.
Budapest acceptance stamps on top of the bbl/chamber-ring will bear the stamp of BP, a single shield or double shield (the double shield starting with the change of Monarchy in 1916 after the death of Emperor Franz Josef) and the last two digits of the year of that too, specific rifle's acceptance.

There are many M.95 that were built in Budapest but were accepted in to service in Austria.
So it's not uncommon to find a Budapest made rifle bearing the Austrian Wiener-Neustadt "W-n (eagle)" acceptance stamp.

There are also early, late and Ersatz (substitute standard) style of parts such as sling swivels, cocking pieces, inner structures of butt-plates, top guards...etc. Though, we'll save that for another day if the need arises.
But ALL parts from both Austria and Hungary M.95, whether early or late style are interchangeable. And it's also common to find "K" and "R" marked parts mixed with each other.

Bulgarian crested receivers are A-H made pieces under contract for Bulgaria and the design was exactly the same.
Correct Bulgarian contract rifle bolts however, will have a gas relief hole in the top forward portion of the bolt-body.


Hope your eyes aren't crossed now and that helps expand on what to look for when you've entered the world of the M1895 straight-pull Mannlicher and it's variants.
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Old 02-03-2013, 2:30 PM
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I'm just gonna throw it out there-

Between the info that Goex and Marcus posted, this thread should probably be stickyed.
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Old 02-03-2013, 8:27 PM
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Don't mean to thread jack, but seeing all the great information on this thread I might as well keep it going...

I have a Bulgarian crested M95 made in Budapest 1909 and by the description posted by GOEX FFF above it fits in the Repetierkarabiner mit Stutzenring category. It is all matching but this is where I got stumped. The bolt has the SN stamped, not electro penciled, on the bolt knob but the bolt is missing the gas hole. Could this be an exception to the Bulgarian bolt rule?
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Old 02-03-2013, 8:56 PM
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Hey Eddie,

Yes, in fact, a number of Pre-WWI Bulgarian Contract M.95's were serialized by the Bulgarians on the bolt by stamping. The Bulgarian's were the only ones to do this to their bolts and is a sign of Bulgarian ownership.
Why it may not have a gas-hole, could be that the bolt was a later replacement of a standard non Bulgarian contract bolt (which would have been common with repair parts being used). Or later, in the 1930's Bulgarian rebuild, the bolt received the infamous Bulgarian stamping. In the 1930's Bulgarian rebuild, both electro-penciling AND stamping was continued Bulgarian practice.


Just for reference, here's what the Bulgarian bolt gas-hole looks like - (Photos by "nick" on Gunboards.com)

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Old 02-04-2013, 6:02 AM
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Man, after all this, my head hurts....

Again I want to thank you guys, and especially Goex for all the details. I am going to try and set up a time to take a look at the rifle as soon as I see the guy again.

Thanks again!
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Old 02-04-2013, 7:26 AM
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I bought one of those $99 specials M95 from J&G a while back and shot it for the first time this last weekend.....and everything everybody said about the recoil, times that by two! not bad for accuracy for the first couple of shots, but I startted to flinch due to the recoil...prettty brutal. But fun little gun.
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Old 02-04-2013, 8:27 AM
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Lots of good info here. We have a Hungarian, Budapest, M95. It has an S on it. I'll have to check where the sling swivels are. I bought it with ammo in clips, chargers(?). Some of it has Nazi stamps, some has a standing lion, Bulgarian?
I've never been able to date the rifle. Any ideas on how to date it? By serial number?
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Old 02-04-2013, 9:36 AM
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Here' mine:


(Mine's Austrian)
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Old 02-04-2013, 9:36 AM
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Originally Posted by mosinnagantm9130 View Post
I'm just gonna throw it out there-

Between the info that Goex and Marcus posted, this thread should probably be stickyed.
agreed.
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Old 02-04-2013, 9:43 AM
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So, OP, did you pick it up after reading all of this?

Great information here, Guys!
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Old 02-04-2013, 10:56 AM
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I don't think there is any real way to date these by serial number....I don't know of any serial number data base or research work on these. Also, many look like they were re-numbered by the Bulgarians or had the original numbers re-stamped without any prefixes.

Usually you look on the barrel for the little proof marking, as it will have the last 2 numbers of the date, like WN(Austrian Imperial Eagle)14 - which would indicate a 1914 date. However, sometimes the big "S" marking will obscure this. Also, ones re-barreled by the Austrians in the 1930's will have an Austrian Bundes Adler (federal eagle) followed by the last 2 numbers of the date it was re-barreled, like 32.
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Old 02-04-2013, 3:52 PM
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The amount of knowledge some guys have around here always surprises me.
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Is that banjo music I hear?
"Sporter" is what the drooling toothless inbred albino with the hacksaw thinks his newly created "dear riffel" is.
"Bubba" is what he and his ugly and ruined rifle really are.
First you are chopping up historic vintage rifles and sticking them in cheap and nasty looking plastic "dildo" stocks that look like some kind of futuristic sex toy that gay space aliens stick up each other's butts.
Next thing you know, you think "Deliverance" is a love story.
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Old 02-04-2013, 5:12 PM
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Don't forget, if you get the .329" bullet sizing die from Lee, you can re-size .338" bullets down to the correct diameter and use them in these rifles. That means that you can actually make some really nice hunting rounds for these using premium bullets. These carbines make really nice brush guns. And with a 200+ grain soft point, you can take down anything in North America out to a reasonable distance.

-Mb
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Old 02-04-2013, 7:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gun toting monkeyboy View Post
Don't forget, if you get the .329" bullet sizing die from Lee, you can re-size .338" bullets down to the correct diameter and use them in these rifles. That means that you can actually make some really nice hunting rounds for these using premium bullets. These carbines make really nice brush guns. And with a 200+ grain soft point, you can take down anything in North America out to a reasonable distance.

-Mb
I saw some .338's for sale and was wondering if you could squeeze them down that much. I have a .329 sizing die I use to put gas checks on cast boolits...... Thanks for the tip MB!
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Old 02-04-2013, 8:01 PM
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+1, this should be stickyed! Here's mine:

Attachment 201400

Attachment 201402

Attachment 201403

Attachment 201404
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Old 02-04-2013, 8:24 PM
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If you buy the rifle.
If you live in my area.
Then I will give you some ammo and a clip for free.
I will not ship.

My M95 loves me, so I want to pass on the love to other CGers.
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Old 02-04-2013, 11:38 PM
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Thanks for a very informative thread! I appreciate the time you all put into it.
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Old 06-12-2013, 5:57 AM
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Well, after some time, I was able to connect with my co-worker off the clock and picked up the M95. It is in beautiful condition!

I didn't have time to take photos last night as it was late by the time the seller made it over. Going from my old man's memory, the serial is S7197. There are matching #'s on the receiver, bolt and stock. The stock has a few minor dings. The finish is probably close to 100%. I'll know more once I clean of the cosmoline. I am still surprised at the condition of this old rifle.

I will post some photos tonight after work.

OHOD, does ammo the offer still stand?
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Last edited by Heatseeker; 06-12-2013 at 6:00 AM.. Reason: fix typo
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Old 06-12-2013, 9:23 AM
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good pick-up, you won't regret it, these little cannons are tons of fun. personally i don't think the recoil is any worse than an m44 mosin, which i really enjoy(maybe nuts). reloading is almost a must, unless you have plenty of money to spend on ammo. prvi partizan makes loaded ammo but it's over a buck a round. that said, if you buy that stuff, save the brass, some reloaders would be very happy to have it. both grafs and buffalo arms sell jacketed bullets from 150-208 gr. i bought the Prvi bullets from grafs which are 208gr fmjbt and am loading them over i think it's 44gr of BL-C(2). haven't tried them out yet but should move along and thump pretty good. i've only shot my m95 a couple times because i've always had feed problems with it. finally narrowed it down to the clips not fitting well. i have a couple dozen clips but only 2 that fit through my action easily. anybody else had this problem? mine is a steyr-made stutzen, matching numbers that i got from big5 when they were like 79 bucks. got a ton of the chicken-marked ammo and clips from a small shop and am hoarding that stuff in case it becomes worth something. i did shoot some and trade some for other stuff but still have a bit. anyhow, enjoy your little beast and welcome to the m95 club! also, as Marcus can vouch for, there's tons of information on gunboards.com and surplusrifleforum.com too!

Last edited by knucklehead0202; 06-12-2013 at 9:24 AM.. Reason: forgot
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Old 06-12-2013, 9:52 AM
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Here is a good website for those Steyr-Mannlichers

http://www.hungariae.com/Mann9030.htm

(Probably where Marcus and Goex got all their info from)
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Old 06-12-2013, 10:30 AM
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I don't know - but this is some of the best and most informative info. (in one place) that I have encountered on the little M95.

Thanks Markus and Goex, great stuff!
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Old 06-12-2013, 12:33 PM
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Wow thanks for this info fellas. Awesome stuff. I am gonna dig out my Austrian and Budapest carbines and see what I actually have.
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Old 06-12-2013, 2:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heatseeker View Post
Well, after some time, I was able to connect with my co-worker off the clock and picked up the M95. It is in beautiful condition!

I didn't have time to take photos last night as it was late by the time the seller made it over. Going from my old man's memory, the serial is S7197. There are matching #'s on the receiver, bolt and stock. The stock has a few minor dings. The finish is probably close to 100%. I'll know more once I clean of the cosmoline. I am still surprised at the condition of this old rifle.

I will post some photos tonight after work.

OHOD, does ammo the offer still stand?

Most of these were re-arsenalled after WWII. Up until a few years ago, it was possible to get them still in their mummy-wrap for $69. Ammo wasn't available aside from the Nazi-marked 1939 stuff, so it kept the price of the guns down. Back then, you could either make your own brass from .45-70, or use 7.62x54R brass that had been resized. The former was time consuming, the latter had too short of a neck to hold the bullets well after it had been fired once or twice. And the bullets cost a lot. Now that you can get factory-made hunting ammunition for them for about the same as most other calibers, these oddball rifles are becoming more and more popular. Add in the fact that the surplus supply of them has dried up, and they are only going to rise in price.

-Mb
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Old 06-12-2013, 10:24 PM
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Here are my his and her matching Steyr 1895 Long Rifle and Carbine.

Going by what i read above by GOEX, i have learned the following about these rifles.

1. The Long rifle is all habsburg; stamped with lots of little K peenings and is all matching. There is no import mark. The bolt stock and front band all appear to match.

2. The shorty is a good example of, what i would suppose after reading the above, a good example of a bulgarian refurb Repetier-Karabiner; swivels on the left side, electric pencil matching, stamp on right side of stock

I am grateful for the Meisters wisdom above, especially Goex and Markus von Doggenlieber



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Old 06-12-2013, 10:40 PM
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Love me the Steyr M95, I have 2.


From what I can find my first rifle was modified in Hungary, I think the correct designation is the Huzagol 31M. The Hungarian conversion to 8x56R have the H stamped on the barrel. The KAB on the stock is the marking for (in English) Central Acceptance Committee, 1932-1944 This means that the gun was probably used by Hungarian troops in World War II.





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Old 06-13-2013, 6:01 AM
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Nice pics Glennsche & Gutz. I still haven't taken any.

Last night, I disassembled and cleaned all the cosmoline from the rifle. It cleaned up really nice.

Then I went on to reassemble it and did something really stupid. I was using a site(http://www.hungariae.com/M95bolt.htm) to guide me on the assembly that said to insert the bolt assembly into the receiver quickly to avoid the bolt from getting hung up. I installed the bolt not realizing that I had failed to put the safety latch in the correct position. The bolt went in about half way and got tight. I thought maybe I hadn't installed it quickly enough. Then I did something really stupid. I gave the bolt a good shove forward. It went in the rest of the way but the safety latch gouged the stock. Badly. So, now I have a M95 with an idiot mark....

After that, I was rather upset with myself and didn't feel much like taking pics. Maybe tonight I'll be able to bring myself to looking at it long enough to snap some pics.
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Old 06-13-2013, 9:08 AM
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NOOOO!!!!

Those bolts can be a ***** to pop back in if they snap! Anyways, check out this guy:
https://www.youtube.com/user/TheKoba49?feature=watch

He knows quite bit about the M95. I emailed him and asked him about mine, cool dude.
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Old 06-13-2013, 7:24 PM
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Well, I got the rifle out for a couple of pics. Looking at my idiot mark still sickens me.

On to the pics:

The whole enchilada. It just hit me that the bolt on my rifle is polished. Incorrect?




Barrel markings


Idiot mark


Overall, this little rifle is in pretty decent shape. from reading above, I'm guessing this is a 95/30? All numbers are stamped, no electro penciling and no import mark anywhere. Just about every part has the serial number or the last two digits of the serial stamped in.

I'll let the experts tell me more .
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Old 06-13-2013, 10:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mosinnagantm9130 View Post
I'm just gonna throw it out there-

Between the info that Goex and Marcus posted, this thread should probably be stickyed.
+1

These guys are always quick to answer any questions we have about straigh-pull Steyr, and these questions come up a lot (I'd say bi-weekly, on average). They were nice enough to talk me through it when I bought mine.

Let's give them a chance of not developing carpal tunnel! Make this one a sticky!!!
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