Calguns.net  

Home My iTrader Join the NRA Donate to CGSSA Sponsors CGN Google Search
CA Semiauto Ban(AW)ID Flowchart CA Handgun Ban ID Flowchart CA Shotgun Ban ID Flowchart
Go Back   Calguns.net > INTERESTS AND ACTIVITIES > Ammo and Reloading
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Ammo and Reloading Factory Ammunition, Reloading, Components, Load Data and more.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-29-2012, 6:04 AM
Yerman's Avatar
Yerman Yerman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Palmdale, CA
Posts: 1,091
iTrader: 16 / 100%
Default Case Trimming and Primer Pocket Cleaning on a Progressive

Hey guys, I have a newbie question. I have a Hornady Lock-n-Load on the way. I'm new to reloading but I have been doing as much reading as I can with my busy schedule.

Something that keeps coming up that I want to ask you guys about is:
  • Importance of case trimming and how vital correct length is with regard to head spacing
  • Primer pocket cleaning

I would like to know what your guys think about these two steps that are difficult to do on a progressive press and their importance in reloading. I'm concerned mainly about safety for myself and my guns.

I am planning on reloading .223, .308, .40s&w, .45 ACP, 9mm, .357 mag, and .38.

I'm a volume shooter so I plan to shoot and reload a lot. I'm not as concerned with highly accurate perfectly prepared ammo as I am with high quantity. The one exception would be the .308 which can be done by breaking up the cycle and running the cases through the progressive press a couple times.

So, what do you guys do? Thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-29-2012, 6:28 AM
shooterbill shooterbill is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Beaumont
Posts: 1,073
iTrader: 34 / 100%
Default

On my LNL, I only prime, charge, and seat/crimp rifle calibers. I have a single stage that I deprime on. Then I do all my prep work.

With 223 I don't trim my cases. I sort them by headstamp and set my crimp die accordingly. I set the seater plug to seat in the middle of the crimp to compensate for small length variances. This is for plinking ammo. It's still very accurate in my rifle.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-29-2012, 6:36 AM
DarkSoul's Avatar
DarkSoul DarkSoul is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: San Jose
Posts: 768
iTrader: 9 / 100%
Default

As for case trimming on pistol brass, I have never done this, the only time I have been concerned about pistol case length is when loading frangibles since to much crimp can fracture the rounds, but instead of trimming, I just sort by length, other than that on pistol brass, I use them until they are damaged, cracked, etc. then toss the bad cases.

Rifle brass is another story, once they are resized, they should be checked for overall length, and if they are over the maximum listed in your reloading book, they must be trimmed to length, or they will jam up. When I first started, I did not do this, and it was nothing but headaches, I would get a failure to extract out of my AR several times per mag, once I started to trim, zero problems.

On a Dillon progressive, you can have a case trimmer on the press, and trim as you go. For 5.56 I have a tool head set up specifically for "case prep" and another for loading. I do use a Dillon 1050 for this (so a bit spendy I admit) but I can process easily 1000 rounds an hour, and load about 800-900 an hour. This could also be done on a much less expensive 650, but the 1050 also swages the primer pockets.

As for cleaning primer pockets, I do all the prep work, and then tumble in SS media, so the primer pockets are very clean, but the reality is, unless you are shooting high precision, it's not that important.
__________________
A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer's hand. Lucius Annaeus Seneca, c. 4BC - 65AD.


Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-29-2012, 6:41 AM
rsrocket1 rsrocket1 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 1,749
iTrader: 11 / 100%
Default

For straight walled pistol cases, you don't need to trim. That's were the LnL AP really shines. 100 rounds in about 15-20 minutes of loading at a very casual and careful pace.
I load all you do except 9mm (at least not *yet*). It's also great that you only need about 5 minutes to change dies, shellplate and primer ram/shuttle (if needed). Be sure to get LnL bushings for each of your dies, at least the pistol dies to start with.

For .223 and .308 I prefer using my single stage press.
1. Lube/Deprime/size/clean off lube
2. Check case length, trim those that need trimming
3. debur/chamfer
4. prime
5. charge
6. seat bullet

No need for primer pocket cleaning unless you are anal.

The only time I use a progressive on .308 is when I shoot the 110g m1 carbine bullets with 10g Unique. I only need to neck size those bullets and I can crank through 100 of those quickly.

I batch process .308 and .223 so that I have a big tupperware container each of sized/trimmed/primed cases and all I need to do is to charge and seat the bullets. No need to change dies on a single stage press, just drop the powder then seat the bullet.

If all you have is the LnL AP take a look at fellow CalGunner Raymond Millbrae on how he loads .223. Yes he uses a Dillon, but the steps are the same as with any progressive where you need to interrupt the process. It was these vids that got me inspired to load and get a progressive myself.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-29-2012, 8:44 AM
Waldog's Avatar
Waldog Waldog is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: SOCAL
Posts: 468
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Default

You do not have to trim straight wall pistol cases. You certainly have to trim bottle-neck rifle cases. I have a LNL. I size/deprime rifle cases on my single stage press. I then tumble the sized case to remove the case lube. After tumbling I use a Giraud Trimmer to trim the cases. I trim rifle cases every time they are fired.

On my LNL I leave the sizing die off and perform all other functions.
1) Prime
2) Powder charge
3) Seat bullets

I don't crimp rifle cartridges.
__________________
I'm the Christian conservative male that CNN warned you about!!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-29-2012, 9:04 AM
echo884 echo884 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Nor Cal/Livermore
Posts: 341
iTrader: 35 / 100%
Default

Forgive me for threadjaking, but you used 10gr Unique for 30 carbine!? Does that cycle for the m1 carbine rifle or just for the revolver?
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-29-2012, 11:02 AM
Yerman's Avatar
Yerman Yerman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Palmdale, CA
Posts: 1,091
iTrader: 16 / 100%
Default

Thanks for the info gents. I'll order up an LNL single stage to go with my AP.

rsrocket1, where are the videos you talk about???

I'm sure you guys will see a lot more of me. I'll try not to post too many stupid questions
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-29-2012, 11:06 AM
Yerman's Avatar
Yerman Yerman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Palmdale, CA
Posts: 1,091
iTrader: 16 / 100%
Default

Found it http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/s...d.php?t=313431
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-29-2012, 11:55 AM
gotglock99 gotglock99 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: north LA
Posts: 119
iTrader: 11 / 100%
Default

Make sure you get some Hornady one shot gun cleaner. When u get the press it has an rust oil on it. Hornady recommends u use the one shot to clean it and degrease it. They do not supply u with any. I was so excited when I got mine and was upset it didn't have any of that cleaner in it. Also bye a lot of extra bushings. This way the dies will be set and all u have to do is drop them in. You will not waste a lot of time adjusting the dies.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-29-2012, 12:20 PM
rsrocket1 rsrocket1 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 1,749
iTrader: 11 / 100%
Default

I've been preaching this since getting mine two years ago.
Mandatory items not included with LnL AP and which should be included:
All this probably would cost Hornady $10, but if you don't have them already, it will mean an extra trip to the store(s) and frustration on your part.

1. Can of One Shot Gun Cleaner and Dry Lube (not the One Shot case lube which looks almost exactly the same in the store). Or a suitable degreaser. You MUST remove the thin layer of anti-rust grease on everything especially all the parts of the Poweder Drop or you'll never get a consistent charge. Bare metal parts on the press will rust because they are plain steel or cast iron.

2. Primer Flipper Tray. They include the pickup tube but not a primer flipper tray to put the primers anvil side down so you can pick them up properly.

3. Grease gun with a Zerk nozzle. You must inject grease into the zerk fittings on the press before using it. Spraying lube does not do it.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 11-29-2012, 12:38 PM
GeoffLinder's Avatar
GeoffLinder GeoffLinder is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Pacifica, CA
Posts: 2,425
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

To answer your Q about trimming versus headspace. One does not effect the other. Headspace is entirely about how far you set the shoulder back on a bottleneck rifle case during resizing. Get a comparator gauge and use it to set up sizing die for your rifle. You measure a fired but unsized case from your rifle then test size a case and measure how the shoulder has been set back. When the setback is in the 1.5 to 2 thousandths range the die is set right to provide proper headspace in YOUR rifle.

This is what I recommend as an easy to use gauge for setting headspace: http://www.lewilson.com/casegage.html

For progressive reloading of bottleneck rifle cartridges, I always, tumble, then decap/resize on a single stage press first, then use a power trimmer, then tumble again before running on the progressive. When sizing has been done before hand no case lube is needed to run them through the progressive (keeps things cleaner) and the press operation is butter smooth because force needed to resize is not applied. Do put a size die in the progressive though, then set the die to just pop the expander ball in and out of the case mouth and run the decapper pin through the primer hole but not set to do any more shoulder setback. This pops out any case mouth dents that may have occurred during tumbling lube off after sizing and also pops out any tumbling media stuck in the flash hole.

I highly recommend either the Gracey or Giraud power trimmers, fast, easy and the added benefit of a case mouth chamfer being done at same time (something the Dillon power trimmer used on a progressive does not do and therefore leaves square and slightly ragged case mouths that make bullet seating more difficult).

Gracey: http://www.matchprep.com/trimmer.htm

Giraud: http://www.giraudtool.com/index.html

Last edited by GeoffLinder; 11-29-2012 at 12:41 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-29-2012, 1:51 PM
Yerman's Avatar
Yerman Yerman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Palmdale, CA
Posts: 1,091
iTrader: 16 / 100%
Default

Great info guys. Thanks for everything. Keep it coming...

This initial investment sure is adding up $$$$
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11-29-2012, 3:22 PM
the86d's Avatar
the86d the86d is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Pinko-occupied ObamaDerkaderkastan
Posts: 5,756
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Default

No trimming pistol brass here, and I think primer pockets get cleaned by benchrest and match shooters.

I sort bottleneck brass by size (case gauges) and them trim what is needed to stay in spec.

I find this style faster:
than this:
as I can watch TV and compare running my finger tips over the top and bottom without looking...
__________________
"That's what governments are for - get in a man's way." - Captain Malcolm 'Mal' Reynolds

Last edited by the86d; 11-29-2012 at 3:30 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 11-29-2012, 5:09 PM
GeoffLinder's Avatar
GeoffLinder GeoffLinder is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Pacifica, CA
Posts: 2,425
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yerman View Post
Great info guys. Thanks for everything. Keep it coming...

This initial investment sure is adding up $$$$
Buy once, cry once, use it for years, make the investment back with ammo savings over the long haul!

Don't start with cheap crap, you just eventually wind up with a box of cheap crap out in back with the beer cans that you don't use anymore and you still wind up buying the good stuff anyway
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 11-30-2012, 12:37 AM
Yerman's Avatar
Yerman Yerman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Palmdale, CA
Posts: 1,091
iTrader: 16 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffLinder View Post
To answer your Q about trimming versus headspace. One does not effect the other. Headspace is entirely about how far you set the shoulder back on a bottleneck rifle case during resizing. Get a comparator gauge and use it to set up sizing die for your rifle. You measure a fired but unsized case from your rifle then test size a case and measure how the shoulder has been set back. When the setback is in the 1.5 to 2 thousandths range the die is set right to provide proper headspace in YOUR rifle.
Hi GeoffLinder, thanks for the info. Do you know of any tutorials or videos that walk someone through this entire process?
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 11-30-2012, 2:51 AM
Yerman's Avatar
Yerman Yerman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Palmdale, CA
Posts: 1,091
iTrader: 16 / 100%
Default

Just placed a huge order with Midsouth Shooters Supply. Can't wait to get everything. They were out of stock on a few items so I will need to do a little more shopping.

I think I have decided on my preferred case prep method. Because of the ease at which you can change dies with the die bushings on the LNL, I think this is going to be my process:

1. Tumble in Lyman 2500
2. Install resizing die and Dillon Rapid Trim 1200 to LNL to resize and trim in one pass on the AP (I'm omitting buying a single stage press for this step) Of course, set up to resize and trim properly
3. I ordered a Hornady Case Prep Trio to chamfer, deburr, and clean primer pockets
4. Tumble a second time to remove sizing wax and final clean
5. Reload

What do you think?
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-30-2012, 3:44 AM
the86d's Avatar
the86d the86d is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Pinko-occupied ObamaDerkaderkastan
Posts: 5,756
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Default

"I" have never removed resizing wax, the only drawback I have seen is that carbon sticks to it, and so does dirt when it hits the ground (and your fingers when you collect it), but you are going to tumble when you get home anyway...
__________________
"That's what governments are for - get in a man's way." - Captain Malcolm 'Mal' Reynolds
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-30-2012, 4:29 AM
rconnerley's Avatar
rconnerley rconnerley is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 179
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Default

I have thought about a procedure similar to what you describe but never got the Dillon trimmer. I have heard that can be a good set up.

The things I don't like about tumbling brass again after I size 'em is that you have to individually check each flash hole to be sure there is no media stuck in there, I also have a had a few experiences of getting dinged case mouths.

One tool that I have had pretty good luck with for bottleneck cases is the RCBS lube die. I put that in station one and my sizing die in station two to decap and resize. I have heard of combining the lube die with the Dillon trimmer to get a decap, lube, size and trim solution, using just two stations. Sounds cool, let me know how it works if you go that route.

I find that using Hornady's spray case lube on the necks (inside and out) along with the lube die generally gives me good lube results and with my case feeder I can make pretty short work of decapping and sizing tasks. My bottleneck rifle case procedure goes like this:

1. Tumble cases
2. Stick cases in loading blocks and spray lube on the necks inside and out
3. Dump cases in case feeder hopper
4. Lube, decap and resize in first pass through the press (Lube die w/ decapping pin, station one, sizer w/o decapping pin, station two)
5. Measure brass, sort by length, set aside brass that needs trimming.
6. Put brass to be loaded in casefeeder
7. prime, load seat and crimp in second pass through the press
8. quick wipe of finished cartridges to remove any excess lube

My other two cents is if you are new to reloading, take your time, work carefully, and ask questions. With the AP press, you may want to start by doing a single step at a time until you learn where to put your eyeballs and what to listen for when performing five, or more, operations simultaneously. Have fun!
__________________
Interested in Appleseed? PM me for info

Last edited by rconnerley; 11-30-2012 at 4:33 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11-30-2012, 5:53 AM
gemoose23's Avatar
gemoose23 gemoose23 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Escaped CA to Iowa
Posts: 1,081
iTrader: 13 / 100%
Default

I use a LNL to process and reload my brass rifle and pistol. For Rifle, I do single steps or non-combo steps placing the completed steps into labeled plastic tubs (I use folgers coffee tubs). This works for me since it allows me to "reload" while watching my toddlers play in the front room.

Rifle
  1. Tumble
  2. I lube with Imperial Sizing and in LNL deprime and resize (position 1).
  3. Trim using electric drill and Possum Hallow trimmer
  4. Deburr and Chamfer, handheld.. guess I should look into some form of powertool.
  5. Tumble, quick 30 mins.
  6. Time to make some magic! Back to LNL, Prime (station 2), Powder (station 3), Bullet & no Crimp (station 5). (station 4 I leave empty as an visual inspection area, but you can use a lockout, powdercop, powdercheck die as well.)

Pistol I just power through trying to get 500 rounds done in a session (500 rounds is the number of Large Primer Tubes I own )

Pistol
  1. Tumble
  2. Deprime (Station 1), Size & Prime (Station 2), Powder (Station 3), Bullet & no Crimp (Station 5). (station 4 I leave empty as an visual inspection area, but you can use a lockout, powdercop, powdercheck die as well.)
__________________
Hornady LnL, Dillon Precision, RCBS, Lee Precision and Lyman User
If You want Match or Leadless hunting Ammo check out Monolithic Munitions Yes I am a shill, friends with the owners.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11-30-2012, 6:35 AM
ar15barrels's Avatar
ar15barrels ar15barrels is online now
I need a LIFE!!
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Van Nuys
Posts: 39,065
iTrader: 88 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rconnerley View Post
The things I don't like about tumbling brass again after I size 'em is that you have to individually check each flash hole to be sure there is no media stuck in there
Install a decapping die in station 1 of the progressive press and you don't need to check the flash holes for media anymore. Let the tools do the work for you...
__________________
Randall Rausch

AR work: www.ar15barrels.com
Bolt actions: www.700barrels.com
Foreign Semi Autos: www.akbarrels.com
Glock, XD and M&P pistols, Benelli and Remington shotguns: barrel, sight, trigger and receiver work.
Most work performed while-you-wait, evening and weekend appointments available.
Founding member of the CAPRC
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 11-30-2012, 7:07 AM
Munny$hot Munny$hot is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,744
iTrader: 45 / 100%
Default

For .223 I use a Lee universal decapper to de-prime first, then tumble clean (primer pockets come out nice with crushed walnut shells, lube cases, re-size, swage, then case gauge. Another good idea is to do a 45 degree tap test on primers that go in to easy to make sure they don't back out and stand your cases upright on a hard surface after they're primed to insure the primers are seated fully (especially for free floating firing pin AR rifles). If it wobbles to a stop it's not seated deep enough. If it vibrate to a stop it's GTG.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 11-30-2012, 7:45 AM
bill_k_lopez's Avatar
bill_k_lopez bill_k_lopez is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Long Beach
Posts: 2,839
iTrader: 20 / 95%
Default

Case trimming and primer pocket cleaning have nothing to do with your choice of a single stage or progressive press. Both are part of case prep BEFORE you even start running your brass through a press.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yerman View Post

I would like to know what your guys think about these two steps that are difficult to do on a progressive press and their importance in reloading. I'm concerned mainly about safety for myself and my guns.
First advice I'd give to a NEW RELOADER is SLOW DOWN. You're concerned about safety - then KISS. Don't try and start with 7 different calibers.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yerman View Post
I am planning on reloading .223, .308, .40s&w, .45 ACP, 9mm, .357 mag, and .38.
__________________
Mark 14:51 - 52

---

Quote:
Originally Posted by jeep7081
The more I am on CalGuns the more I see why government keeps certain people from owning firearms.
[/size]
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 11-30-2012, 9:16 AM
GeoffLinder's Avatar
GeoffLinder GeoffLinder is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Pacifica, CA
Posts: 2,425
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ar15barrels View Post
Install a decapping die in station 1 of the progressive press and you don't need to check the flash holes for media anymore. Let the tools do the work for you...
^^ This!

Plus, if you use a standard sizing die instead of just a decapper die, you get the added benefit of the expander ball popping any case mouth dents out from second tumbling pass. Just screw the die out enough to not do any shoulder setback or sizing and then extend decapper pin setting to make sure it goes through the flash hole.

Another set of benefits to this two step, size, trim, tumble and then load on progressive method is that 1. the cases are dry and no lube gets into the system like it will if you resize and trim right on the progressive and 2. the resizing force is eliminated from the process and the press runs butter smooth and force on shell plate doesn't upset the seating die as much (teeter-totter effect).
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 11-30-2012, 1:00 PM
BLR81's Avatar
BLR81 BLR81 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Folsom since 92
Posts: 347
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

If your buying LNL dies, know that some of the pistol die sets come with either a roll or taper crimp die. Always go with the taper die since you only want to knock out the flair.

Since your braking up the process in two stages, I'd add a powder check die to avoid the possibility of a double charge.

Unlike a hand primer seater, seating with a press makes it hard to differentiate between soft and hard seating. So for at least the first seating I like to use a primer pocket reaming tool and a Flash Hole Uniformer Tool to take off the burrs around the flash hole. Depending on how clean the primers burn, I might clean out the primer pocket every 3-4 reloads.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 11-30-2012, 1:02 PM
Son of BAR7's Avatar
Son of BAR7 Son of BAR7 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Oakland
Posts: 319
iTrader: 11 / 100%
Default

Re running brass through the progressive, I've found that splitting the sequence made for a more efficient use of time.

I use a Lee 4-stage progressive reloader
I usually save up brass until I have a few hundred to reload, and I load for plinking.

I'll remove the advance mechanism (twisted steel shaft) turning it into a single stage, then deprime & size one box worth of brass, clean pockets, check length and reprime w/ a hand press.

Then re-install the advance shaft, and proceed normally, ending each cycle with a spent case in the depriming die.

After depriming my last 20 or 50 cases (depending on what I'm reloading) I'll remove the depriming die so I don't accidentally remove new primers, and finish off the last batch.

...clear as mud?
__________________
Liberty is 'Freedom To' not 'Freedom From'

When they kick in your front door,
How you gonna come?
With your hands on your head,
Or on the trigger of your gun?
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 11-30-2012, 8:50 PM
1idcat's Avatar
1idcat 1idcat is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: The Intermountain West
Posts: 15
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

I reload .223 for long range (800 yards) steel targets. High volume and acceptable accuracy.

I use the LNL AP as follows:

Brass is run thru the tumbler to get the range dirt off.

Lube cases. I use homemade spray lube made from Lanolin in 99% Isopropyl Alcohol (1:12) in a gallon ziplock bag. Spread out to dry a couple of minutes.

Run through the LNLAP with:
Station 1: Universal decapping die.

Station 3: Dillon 1200 trimmer, set to FL size and trim. The Dillon cuts very squarely. No outside burr.

Station 5: Redding FL size die, backed off so that only the carbide expander does anything. This smooths out the inside of the case neck.


Cases go back into the tumbler to remove the lube.

If using Mil cases, remove the primer crimp (first use only).
Deburr the flash holes (first use only).

I don't deburr or chamfer the cases necks. I don't clean out the primer pocket.


Loading is set up as follows:

Station 1: Universal decapping die. This makes sure the flash hole is clear.
Station 2: Powder drop.
Station 3: Powder cop die (optional).
Station 4: Redding bullet seater die.
Station 5: Lee Factory Crimp Die (only used for bullets with a cannelure, like plinking FMJs)

I love the Dillon trimmer with my LNLAP! Every case gets trimmed to length every time, without any extra effort. Case length is more consistent than my old RCBS trimmer could ever do.

YMMV
__________________
You gonna pull them pistols, or start whistling 'Dixie'? -tojw
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 12-01-2012, 5:31 AM
GeoffLinder's Avatar
GeoffLinder GeoffLinder is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Pacifica, CA
Posts: 2,425
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yerman View Post
Hi GeoffLinder, thanks for the info. Do you know of any tutorials or videos that walk someone through this entire process?
Look at Raymond's video on .223 loading on a progressive for a good starter.

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/s...d.php?t=313431

I also recommend a book by Glen Zediker on reloading for accuracy which explains the multitude of steps you can do with case prep and controlling your process to get high quality ammo out the other end. Glen does it all single stage but the basics of accuracy loading are the same no matter how you do it. The real key to doing things well here is understanding the process and then adapting that knowledge to your mode.

http://www.zediker.com/books/handloading/hlmain.html
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 6:38 PM.




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Proudly hosted by GeoVario the Premier 2A host.
Calguns.net, the 'Calguns' name and all associated variants and logos are ® Trademark and © Copyright 2002-2016, Calguns.net an Incorporated Company All Rights Reserved.