Calguns.net  

Home My iTrader Join the NRA Donate to CGSSA Sponsors CGN Google Search
CA Semiauto Ban(AW)ID Flowchart CA Handgun Ban ID Flowchart CA Shotgun Ban ID Flowchart
Go Back   Calguns.net > SPECIALTY FORUMS > Ladies Forum
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Ladies Forum A place for our female Calgunners to discuss, share and interact without the 'excess attention' sometimes found in online forums.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-04-2014, 6:58 PM
C6H6 C6H6 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 14
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default Do new rifles need maintenance?

My Henry youth lever action I ordered over a year ago has finally arrived! I will pick it up from the FFL when I go to their basic rifle training class.

Since I won't have it ahead of time, will it hurt the rifle to shoot it straight out of the box?

Does a new rifle need some maintenance before shooting it the first time like oil, cleaning, etc?

The sad thing is I cannot find any .22LR ammo because I live in one of those cities that businesses will not ship to. Sigh.
__________________
Test.

Last edited by C6H6; 05-04-2014 at 7:00 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-04-2014, 7:06 PM
Pauliedad Pauliedad is offline
CGN/CGSSA Contributor - Lifetime
CGN Contributor - Lifetime
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Contra Costa County - 925
Posts: 2,129
iTrader: 73 / 100%
Default

I've had some new long guns show up with a light coating not quite sticky but not oil either. I've cleaned with Balistol and all is well. Action gets a wipe down with same.
One 10/22 showed up with oil only. That I shot as is.
I would run at least a snake through it with some light oil.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-04-2014, 7:59 PM
97F1504RAD's Avatar
97F1504RAD 97F1504RAD is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Nor Cal-East Bay Area
Posts: 5,086
iTrader: 72 / 100%
Default

I always do a complete cleaning of all new guns.
__________________
Shop @ Amazon via link to Donate to CGF:
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-05-2014, 6:19 AM
thomashoward's Avatar
thomashoward thomashoward is offline
In Memoriam
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Sonoma County
Posts: 2,005
iTrader: 72 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 97F1504RAD View Post
I always do a complete cleaning of all new guns.
Clean before firing the first time to remove oil/preservatives and metal chips lapping compound left from the rifling process.
Always wipe down before putting away to remove fingerprints/salt sweat etc.

Last edited by thomashoward; 05-06-2014 at 9:46 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-05-2014, 11:25 AM
sdkevin's Avatar
sdkevin sdkevin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,246
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Does a new rifle need some maintenance before shooting it the first time like oil, cleaning, etc?
Hell yes! Do you want to put a bullet through a barrel w/o knowing what condition it's in?
__________________
After watching WTC Bldg #7 being razed, and considering it's main occupants..

I stumbled onto this note while checking advanced weapons..
"911 = false flag. WTC 7 was brought down by demolition. 47 floors came down in 6 1/2 seconds - not hit by a plane. Just one of hundreds of absurdities that occurred that day. Wake up".
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-05-2014, 11:33 AM
Asphodel Asphodel is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Mt Hamilton, CA
Posts: 1,961
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by thomashoward View Post
Clean before firing the first time to remove oil/preservatives and metal chips left from the rifling process.
Always wipe down before putting away to remove fingerprints/salt sweat etc.
If I may 'expand and clarify' a bit on Mr Howard's comment......

There won't be chips from the rifling process, as all commercial barrel makers use a 'lapping' process, which polishes the bore of the barrel after it is rifled, using a special tool called, a 'lap', which uses a fine abrasive material to bring up a high polish in the bore.

This high level of finish is necessary to allow the projectile to run through the bore without being itself abraded by the surface of the bore.

There can, indeed, be 'rough spots' in the parts of the mechanism of a firearm, callled 'burrs', which, in high quality firearms, are carefully removed, and the components polished to a high finish, so that they work smoothly against one another.

Unfortunately, some manufacturers do not adequately enforce quality standards in their production, resulting in some firearms being sold which really should be disassembled, inspected for burrs or foreign material, and corrected as necessary.

A sad example of this could be Smith & Wesson revolvers built during a certain time-frame.

When Doug Wesson was in charge of the company, very high standards of quality were enforced in that firm's production, but, in later years, the firm was bought out by a 'holding company', whose 'bean-counters' replaced skilled workers with low-wage workers, and the product quality was such that a new Smith revolver had to be 're-worked' before it was surely serviceable.

The 'moral of the story' is that 'standards of quality' in firearms work is a variable, according to the care of the workers who built the components and assembled the weapon.

With any new weapon, except those of especially well-known makers, such as the Colt custom shop, it really should be disassembled, and carefully inspected for burred components and foreign materials in the mechanism.

However........any such disassembly and inspection/deburring/polishing of components really 'must' be done by someone who has taken the time to develop the specialised skills required to do so correctly.

These skills are easily learned, and one may find quite a few books which will guide one through the process. Simple disassembly, deburring, component polishing where needed and correct oiling may be easily learned by anyone who is willing to be careful and prudent.

The 'details of technique' are well explained in many books and manuals on the subject, but one must be careful to read the manual for any specific weapon before beginning any disassembly. Especially with some of the lower-priced firearms, one must have special tools to work on them without damaging components.

cheers

Carla
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-05-2014, 11:44 AM
C6H6 C6H6 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 14
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sdkevin View Post
Hell yes! Do you want to put a bullet through a barrel w/o knowing what condition it's in?
Don't they test shoot it at the factory? If there were any debris, etc, wouldn't that have already harmed the rifle?
__________________
Test.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-05-2014, 12:13 PM
sdkevin's Avatar
sdkevin sdkevin is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,246
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
If there were any debris, etc, wouldn't that have already harmed the rifle?
It's your face behind that gun powder/steel.

Your call.
__________________
After watching WTC Bldg #7 being razed, and considering it's main occupants..

I stumbled onto this note while checking advanced weapons..
"911 = false flag. WTC 7 was brought down by demolition. 47 floors came down in 6 1/2 seconds - not hit by a plane. Just one of hundreds of absurdities that occurred that day. Wake up".
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-05-2014, 12:37 PM
jmatt511's Avatar
jmatt511 jmatt511 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 236
iTrader: 10 / 100%
Default

You should always breakdown whatever weapon you get to familiarize yourself with it's function in case there is a problem down the line. You should clean and lube it. Verify there is nothing stuck in the barrel which could lead to a catastrophic failure. Also, take it out before your class and determine what your point of aim versus point of impact is. The middle of the class is not the place to learn these very basic concepts. You'll find you will have a more pleasant experience during instruction. Good luck and good shooting.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-23-2014, 12:47 PM
Sunday Sunday is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Shasta Co.
Posts: 5,434
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Default

Nice choice "the Henry"
__________________
California the only state in the union where the idiot gun owners vote in anti gun politicians and wonder where their gun rights have gone.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-28-2014, 11:52 AM
BonnieB's Avatar
BonnieB BonnieB is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 1,825
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Default

With any new gun, I like read the directions FIRST. And then read them again. Then, watch a couple YouTubes on the same rifle. After all that, I like to take it partially apart before shooting it, so I know how it works, what's in there, and is it clean and appropriately lubed. I say partially disassemble, because once a trigger mechanism fell apart in my hand while cleaning the rest of the gun and I had a devil of a time getting it back together. Earned many years in Purgatory, cussing.

I disagree somewhat with jmatt, above, if you are a brand new shooter. If you are, you should take your class first, so you understand gun safety, proper handling, etc. If you are experienced with another rifle, no problem. I don't think it will ruin your gun to shoot it for the first time in your rifle class. If it were a problem, your instructors wouldn't let you.

BTW, even if the class provides ammo, bring some extra ammo along, you're gonna want to shoot some more after the class is over.
__________________
WHAT I HAVE LEARNED SO FAR, MOSTLY THE HARD WAY
• Do only safe sex. Never have sex with someone crazier than you are.
• Don't marry or move in together before you're both at least 25.
• Don't have children until you're married five years or at least age 30.
• Put 10% of your salary into savings every month no matter how broke you are.
• Don't ever screw around with the IRS.
• Keep a handgun on your bedside table.
• Don't smart-mouth judges, or cops who stop you on the road.

Last edited by BonnieB; 07-28-2014 at 11:55 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-28-2014, 12:13 PM
Spyguy's Avatar
Spyguy Spyguy is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Marin County, CA
Posts: 7,388
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Default

At the very least, you should run a patch down the bore to remove any packing grease or heavy coat of oil. A wiped film of oil in the bore is ok, but a wet coat of oil or any grease could be destructive.

Since you are taking a basic rifle class at the FFL where you will be picking up the firearm, why don't you call them up and ask if one of the instructors will show you how to breakdown, clean, and re-assemble the rifle prior to your class range time. I'd bet they'd be happy to do that at no extra cost.

As far as .22LR ammo goes, it would help if you mentioned what area you live in (county or city). I'm sure some Calgunners can point you to a source. Some may even be willing to donate some to you.
__________________
"The Second Amendment is a doomsday provision, one designed for those exceptionally rare circumstances where all other rights have failed—where the government refuses to stand for re-election and silences those who protest; where courts have lost the courage to oppose, or can find no one to enforce their decrees. However improbable these contingencies may seem today, facing them unprepared is a mistake free people get to make only once." - Justice Alex Kozinski, 9th US Circuit Crt of Appeals
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:27 PM.




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Proudly hosted by GeoVario the Premier 2A host.
Calguns.net, the 'Calguns' name and all associated variants and logos are ® Trademark and © Copyright 2002-2016, Calguns.net an Incorporated Company All Rights Reserved.