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Old 03-19-2011, 4:34 AM
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Default Home Nickel Plating one of your own guns !!!

Some of you may not be aware of the profussion of inexpensive, and very high quality, home plating kits and suppliers out in the world today, and so, therefore, I decided to publish this article about how to home plate, one of your own guns, cheaply, and easily, with Excellant Results!!!

Unbeknownst to most persons who have never plated at home, the HIGH GRADE finish achieved by professional plating shops is NOT a result of EXPENSIVE plating tanks at all. The High Grade, Mirror Finish results, are due to multiple buffing and polishing steps, inbetween the various plating layers as a person builds up the electro-plating on the plated surface. And as any home crafstman knows, buffing machines at hardware distributors are probably the second cheapest machine to set up your home shop with, next to an inexpensive hand held, chord powered 1/4" electric drill. I was down at Home Depot the other day, picking up some stuff, and I saw a 4" two ended Ryobi grinding wheel machine, with the angle rests, two grinding wheels, and one each of a wire brush, and a spiral cotton buffing wheel, WITH an integral goose-neck lamp built in, for, $44.95 !!!... And, you could buy it's big brother, a 6" dual wheel machine, for a whopping $66.95 !!! Cheap, cheap, CHEAP !!! They also had a wide selection of various grades of buffing and polishing compounds, in stick form, all for around 3 bux a stick.... I almost picked up the little 4" Ryobi just to have as a spare in case my existing one ever burt out on me in the middle of a project !!!

A little 4 or 6" bufing/grinding machine is all a home gunsmith would ever need to buff out any metal part on any gun in their collection, INCLUDING the barrel of a Brown Besse flintlock, or a Revolutionary war French Military Musket, barrels that are extroidinarily LONG.

Well.... on with the PROJECT !!!

I have this pair of 1863 Remington 31 Caliber (5-Shot) Pocket Pistols, made by the F. LLI. Pietta Company of Italy, and purchased recently from Dixie Gun Works (DGW) of Tennessee. Stock from the factory box, the pistols have a solid brass (Actually, it's not brass anymore, the old originals were brass, modern reproduction guns are made with a new bronze alloy that looks just like brass, but is bronze, and is considerably stronger and more durable that the original brass pieces were. So, all the chatter on the internet, about, "I think I may have WARPED my brass framed gun !!!" ... Well... if its a newly made reproduction from a major manufacturer... Nope, NOT HAPPENING !!!)
The frame, backstrap, and trigger gaurd, are in the brass finish. The barrel, loading lever, cylinder pin, and cylinder, are blued steel, and the trigger and hammer, case hardened steel. They are handsome pistols from the factory, to be sure, but... but... even handsome can be made BETTER right?

I had this vision in my head, of Gold plating the brass finish parts, and Nickel Plating EVERYTHING else, including the hammer and trigger... The more I closed my eyes and imagined it... The more I wanted to re-finish the the matched pair of pocket pistols, and... AND... I wanted to to the whole job MYSELF !!!

I came across a company on the internet, Caswell Plating, out of Long Island New York, and they had a really big selection of hobbist plating kits, from very small and modest home set-ups, to larger tank systems for smaller sized specialty plating shops geared towards small items with very high quality finishes, such as watches, jewelery, detailed models, and.... GUNS !!! (clap... clap... CLAP !!!)

So... I bought some of their stuff... and BOY, am I IMPRESSED !!!

They have developed a very nifty, inexpensive, and very EFFECTIVE patented electro-plating system that does NOT REQUIRE expensive plating tanks or gallons and gallons of expensive plating solutions. They instead, utilize a "Plating wand", that is dipped into a plating solution concentrate, and brushed over a small piece, electro-plating the piece in a matter of a few minutes, using only a small, 4.5v or 1.7v pocket sized dc power supply/transformer as the electrical source for the electro plating process. That's it, that's the WHOLE ENCHILLADA... One plating wand, one little pocket sized power converter/transformer, and one bottle of plating solution... thats the ENTIRE SYSTEM !!!, No 20 gallon tanks, no gallons and gallons of plating solution, no titanium 2000w tank heaters, no circulating filter pumps, no bars of pure plating metal, no titanium plating racks, and NO 25 amp or greater EXPENSIVE power rectifiers... NONE of that AT ALL !!!

Of course, if any of you have read any of my "how to" articles in the past, you know what a purist I am... and yes... I am drooling over the tanks... I want a Tank Plating system too !!! But, for now, it will have to wait, until I buy my next two or three rifles... I want them MORE than a plating tank at the moment !!! And... there is no real need for a tank systems such as plating a large rifle, it can all be done, in TOP QUALITY, with the little, inexpensive, "Plug N Plate" wand plating kits just fine !!!

The process, for plating by this method, does require ONE tanking step, that of degreassing and cleaning the parts to be plated, with something called an "SP" cleaning solution. This needs to be done before each plating step, and with high quality plating projects, there are several plating steps, it's not just a simple matter of dumping one plating coat onto the item, nope, not at all. The cleaning solution, needs to be in a tank, as it is heated to about 140 degrees farenheight, which means, you will need a cleaning tank heater, and a heater thermostat, but don't panic, those items are all inexpensive, not a major layout of bucks at all. With plating, any grease or oil at all, will have a DISASTEROUS effect on the plated piece, touching the metal, one time, even with just washed hands, will require re-cleaning and degreasing of the part before proceeding onto the actual plating step.

The basic overall steps are, buff off any unwanted finish on the piece, clean/degrease the piece, copper plate the first copper layer. buff and polish the piece, fill in any scratches or pits with a soft filler compound, which is also available from Caswell Plating (Again, very cheap stuff). Lightly sand the filled areas, buff the piece again. Clean and degrease the piece, then, apply the second layer of copper plating. buff and polish the second layer of copper plating, clean and degrease the piece again. (You WILL get your money's worth out of the cleaning/degreasing tank/heater set-up). Now, you are ready for your first finish platng layer, if this is to be a two metal plating finish, as with Nickel or Gold plating, if you wish to go onto a chrome plated piece, that would be a three metal plating job. (Ahhh... you say... That's WHY Chrome Plating costs so MUCH !!! As chrome plating on steel is generally done by first copper plating and buffing then nickel plating and buffing, and finally chrome plating a polishing.) Now, if Nickel Plating the piece, after cleaning and degreasing yet again, Nickel plate the first layer. Remove and rinse, buff and polish, clean and degrease, and Nickel plate the piece a SECOND time... For a truely PRO JOB, repeat this process a THIRD time, for a three layered Nickel plating final finish... Your Nickel plating is now DONE. As I pointed out in the begining... It's all the darned buffing and polishing that makes the end result a PRO JOB, not the tanks !!!

The following composite photo set, shows the basic steps using the casewell Plug N Plate wand plating system. (Minus all the buffing and polihsing and cleaning/degreasing steps in the heated cleaning/degreasing tank.) As performed against a metal watch, the process is exactly the same on gun parts I assure you.



Step One...

Strip the part of any unwanted existing finish. In the case of a blued gun piece, this would be with a soft metal wire brush, (Such as aluminum or copper/brass, mounted on your electricgrinding/buffing machine.)After removing the existing finish, buff the surface, with a spiral cotton buffing wheel, and a buffing compound, to a medium finish raw steel buff.

Step Two...

Clean and degrease the piece in the heated cleaning tank filled with the SP cleaning solution. allow to stand for a minimum of 5 minutes in the 140 degree tank. Carefully remove the cleaned/degreased piece, from the tank, with tongs, rinse with cool clear water, pat dry the piece with a towel... DO NOT TOUCH the piece with your hands, if you do, you MUST clean and degrease the piece again !!! Use a paper towel, or a tissue, to handle the piece after pat drying.

Step Three...

First layer of copper plating, base layer, for either Gold, Nickel, Silver or Chrome final finish plating. Attach the aligator clip to the piece to be plated, soak the electro plating wand in the electro plating solution, let the wand stand at least two minutes in the solution before you begin to wand the piece. Gently, brush the piece, with the plating wand, in gentle motions, switching back and forth between circular and linear motions. Just be patient, in about 45 seconds to a minute, you will begin to see the effects of the electro plating, the piece will begin to change color, and once the plating begins, it will plate faster, and faster, as you keep proceeding. Thoroughly brush all sides of the plated piece until you are nearly satisfied with the plating layer, move the aligator clip, on the work, to another location, and wand the area where the clip used to be attached, continuing to wand the rest of the piece as well. When nearly done with this layer, move the aligator clip one more time, and touch up the part where the aligator clip hand been attached. Unplug the plating power supply, place the wand back into the solution. remove the aligator clip, and rinse the piece with cool clear water, pat dry the piece, you may now handle the piece, as the next step is to buff the first layer of the copper plating.

Step Four...

Using metalic filler paste, fill in any areas of the buffed piece that may have scratches or pits on it, allow the filler to drya few minutes, sand the filler with fine grit sandpaper, and buff and polish the piece again. Rinse the piece with clear cool water, and de-grease and clean the piece in the cleaning tank again.

Step Five...

Copper plate the piece with the wand plating brush, as performed before. rinse the piece with clear water, and buff the piece again. De-grease and clean the piece in the heated cleaning tank.

Step Six...

Now, if this is a two metal plating job, proceed on with the finish plating at this time. If Nickel, plate with the Nickle plating solution, if Gold, then Gold. When the first layer of plating is completed. Rinse with clear water, buff and polish, and clean and de-grease in the heated cleaning tank.

Step Seven...

Plate, rinse, buff and degrease a second finish plating layer

Step Eight...

Plate, rinse, buff and degrease a third finish plating layer...

If you are going to go for the gold, and go for a Crome finish... perfom three more plating sequences, only now, layering Chrome plating on top of the Nickel Plating.

Clean, dry, and set aside your piece, it is finished... Repeat these steps for all the pieces to be plated on your project.

The following sequence of photos starts out with the stock, standard, brass and blued steel pocket pistol, and ends up with the finished plated pistol pair, in their display case.











Continued with part TWO...

Have fun with it guys !!!

Sincerely,

Elvin Warrior... aka... David
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Last edited by ElvinWarrior; 03-20-2011 at 4:57 PM.. Reason: Editing
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Old 03-19-2011, 4:36 AM
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Default Home Nickel Plating one of your own guns !!! Part TWO

Part Two...

Well guys, there you have it... Naturally, in order to plate the barrel, the barrel had to be removed from the frame, and of course, the entire gun, all parts, had to be disasembled, all pieces sanded, cleaned, buffed, plated, over and over in the same step sequences, until, finally, all parts, all pieces, were completed, and the pistols could be re-assembled. But I think, the final photograph says it all... a very nice plating job, done for LESS MONEY than a plating shop would have charged you, and in the end, you now have all the stuff to plate another project, you just need to pick up some more plating solution, which isn't all that expensive, for most metals, except for Gold, which is a bit pricey. 11.95 for an 8oz bottle of copper or Nickel, and... about 69.95 for a 4 oz bottle of Gold... but, you have all the other stuff, the heated cleaning tank, the cleaning solutions, the wands and the power supplies, so, any further plating projects drops the cost of plating down to something less than the cost of ammunition for an afternoon at the range.... CHEAP !!! DIRT CHEAP !!!

Have fun with it guys !!!

Sincerely,

Elvin Warrior... aka... David

P.S....

In case any of you are wondering... Here is a breakdown with some of the costs involved with plating using this method.

Plug N Plate Copper/Nickel Kit, includes plating wand, power supply, and two plating solutions, Copper and Nickel............. 46.99

Plug N Plate Gold kit, includes plating wand, power supply and 24Kt Gold plating solution.......................................... .... 67.99

2lbs of SP cleaning/degreasing Crystals, enough for 4 gallons, you only need two for small jobs..................................... 21.29

2 Gallon white plastic cleaning/degreasing tank with lid............................................... ........................................... 7.10

300 Watt Titanium small tank heater (For the Heated Cleaning/Degreasing Tank)............................................. ........... 17.99

Heater Thermostat........................................ .................................................. ................................................ 17.74

Agitating Filter pump (For Cleaning/Degreasing Tank, keeps solution clean so it lasts for many, many jobs)...................... 22.95

Soft metal filler for scratch/pit filling and finishing......................................... .................................................. ....... 5.95

All of these supplies are available from http://www.caswellplating.com
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Last edited by ElvinWarrior; 03-19-2011 at 4:49 AM.. Reason: Additional Details
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Old 03-19-2011, 7:26 AM
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If the text you used didn't sound like an advertising minion, I might have got past the second paragraph which stated:

Quote:
Yes, you read that RIGHT, I said PROFESSIONAL QUALITY results, from an INEXPENSIVE home plating hobby kit !!!
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Old 03-19-2011, 7:57 AM
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Well,
I have used this exact method (and supplier) several dozen times. I used it on antique radios.

It is not the same as a "professional" can do in a tank. Not nearly as thick as tank plating. It will wear faster. But if it is never handles, then maybe.

I have done both and there is no comparing the two.

Dolk
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Old 03-19-2011, 8:14 AM
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I don't get it?.......why?
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Old 03-19-2011, 10:45 AM
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Dear Dolk,

Plating, is time dependant, if you only plate until a color change occurs, then, the plate will be thin, if, you plate for at least 10 minutes, and tripple plate, you will, I assure you, have a finish as good as a tank plate job.

And, there are finishing coats, you can purchase from Caswell, or others, which will, protect a thin plate job, but as I pointed out, if you are patient, and plate properly, you won't need them.

Excuse me for being a doubting Thomas on your response, but... to quote you...

"I have used this exact method (and supplier) several dozen times. I used it on antique radios.

It is not the same as a "professional" can do in a tank. Not nearly as thick as tank plating. It will wear faster. But if it is never handles, then maybe."

If you have found, by going back and buying Caswell products, over and over, again and again, DOZENS of times... and... The results were less than satisfactory.... Then, why, oh why, have you been a repeat customer of an "inferior plating system", Dozens and Dozens of times ???

I am confused by that just a little bit....

Ross,

I'm sorry you took it that way, I assure you I am not employed by, or affiliated with Caswell Plating Inc., in any way, shape or form. I am just very excited about their products, and very satisfied with the results I got by FOLLOWING THEIR INSTRUCTIONS EXACTLY.

In our "let the buyer beware" free capitalism system we have, I just find it refreshing, and rewarding, to come across an honest company, with an honest product, that produces exactly the results promised...

Unfortunately, this seems to be a rare exception in this advanced modern world of ours today.

Christ, even major "world leader" copmpanies, like Micro****, can't seem to keep their products up and running for more than a few hours without some sort of a problem, crash, delay, unexpected and unwanted update, CONSTANTLY, and we all just sit back and accept this type of crap company "policy" as "good business"...

Excuse me, but I differ slightly in my perspectives.

To the general readership....

A quick comparisson, of the costs involved, using the Plug N Plate method, which DOES REQUIRE that you be patient, and use more TIME to get the job done, and, the expense involved, by buying a tanking system, which will do the job more quickly, with less fuss and bother, using the same supplier, Caswell Plating... looky at the following figures...

My total expense, for my entire set-up, using the Casewell Plug N Plate kits, with the heated, re-circulating cleaning tank, including shipping, came in at less than $200.00 to completely tripple plate, in a two toned gold and nickel plating job, for TWO pistols, and a few other items I also threw into the mix, such as home plating a standard remington #10 cap tin, in Tripple Gold pure 24Kt gold plate, to produce a presentation cap box, for my cased set.... AND... I have enough plating solutions left over to plate an entire other pistol, which I may do, before the weekend is over....

And Purchasing, JUST ONE, tank plating system, to perform the same job, using a tank method, for the copper/nickle plating, using the casewell tank plating kit, which costs, $299 for the 3 gal kit, AND, that does NOT INCLUDE, the rectifier power supply, so... add in another... $149.00 for that... Now... add in the Gold plating 1gal kit, at, $439.00, and the power rectifier supply at another $149.00... and you arrive at... $1,036.00, plus shipping and handling, to "experiment" with something, you
may or may not wish to do ever again.... and it seems clear to me, as someone who would rather spend that thousand dollars on a Uberti 45/70 trap door carbine, that this is a rather expensive set up for a first timer not sure they are going to pursue this much further...

excuse me, but I am ONE HAPPY SATISFIED CUSTOMER, and I consider my less than $200.00 blown on this, which nets me the ability to plate another 4 pistols, or an entire rifle, by just buying three more bottles of solution, for an additional 50 bux or so, one HECK OF A DEAL !!!

Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David
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Last edited by ElvinWarrior; 03-19-2011 at 12:53 PM.. Reason: tech error
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Old 03-19-2011, 12:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ElvinWarrior View Post
Dear Dolk,
If you have found, by going back and buying Caswell products, over and over, again and again, DOZENS of times... and... The results were less than satisfactory.... Then, why, oh why, have you been a repeat customer of an "inferior plating system", Dozens and Dozens of times ???

I am confused by that just a little bit....
ElvinWarrior... aka... David
Easy,
Never said "they were less than satisfactory", that is your words.

When you are plating items like small screws, tube holders, small hardware on an antique radio that never gets handled or touched it is a great method. The reason it went bad in the first place is years and years of exposure to everything. These parts are perfect for the small unit you are talking about. So I use it over and over again.

I also do the old candle stick phones and I have a nickel tank I use to plate those parts. These parts are handled a lot.

I'm sorry, but you can sit and run that unit you are talking about for an hour and never build up Nickel as fast and as smooth as a tank.

Caswell's have been around for years. That Nickel unit you are talking about has been around for years also. I remember seeing them in the early 60's in car magazines to do touch ups on car parts also. Used to call them "porr man's chrome". I'm sure they were around way before that also. I have bought many of them from Caswell's along with other supplies for my Nickel tank.

They work.

90% of any Nickel or chrome job is prep work. The other 10% can be overcome with a good tank. You can build until the scratch or small pit is gone.

Dolk

wish I had a close up of the one on the right, you could see a good nickel job.
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Last edited by Dolk; 03-19-2011 at 12:39 PM..
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Old 03-19-2011, 1:07 PM
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Dolk,

Thanks for the clarification, and, thats a very interesting "other" hobby you have there. Do you rebuild these old radios and other such items to sell, or just for fun?

And, just an FYI, the way that electro plating works, is that, when an electric DC current is applied across an anode, and a cathode, with a conductive plating solultion, that either, chemically, contains the metal ions in the liquid, or, in a tank plating system, where there are bars of the source plating metal, imersed in the tank, and the only purpose of the liquid, is as a conductive transfer medium.... When the current is applied, metal is deposited onto the surface of the part to be plated, period. The longer the current is applied, the more metal is deposited, whether you are using the wand method, or the tank method, this is just physics. You may not be able to visibly determine the differance, between wand plating for 5 minutes, or wand plating for 10 minutes, but there is a differance, more metal IS BEING DEPOSITED, PERIOD. You are mistaken, to think, that wand plating for 15 minutes deposits no more metal plating, than wand plating for 5 minutes, thats just not how it works at all.

And, another FYI, as an antique radio afficionado, you will appreciate this photo of a 1936 Capehart Farnsworth, I have in my own radio collection, which I restored myself as well. (It required no plating, it was all cabinette and electronics work. I wouldn't waste my time plating old 1936 screws, when, exactly the same kinds of screws and bolts were being manufactured in 1936 as are being made today, I just replaced all that sort of stuff with new screws and bolts, which are, exactly the same as the old ones were to begin with.)



Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David
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Old 03-19-2011, 3:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ElvinWarrior View Post
Dolk,And, another FYI, as an antique radio afficionado, you will appreciate this photo of a 1936 Capehart Farnsworth, I have in my own radio collection, which I restored myself as well. (It required no plating, it was all cabinette and electronics work. I wouldn't waste my time plating old 1936 screws, when, exactly the same kinds of screws and bolts were being manufactured in 1936 as are being made today, I just replaced all that sort of stuff with new screws and bolts, which are, exactly the same as the old ones were to begin with.)
Sincerely,
ElvinWarrior... aka... David
Ah, see......the screws are not the same now as they were. Round head screws on telephones and radios (1910's to 30's) were much more "round" then they are today. You can actually tell if you really look hard. That and it is nice to be able to say "it is all original including the screws" when you're done.

Funny thing is, with radios and telephones it is excepted to "restore them". No so much with an antique firearm.

I mostly do them for myself these days. I'm done putting in hundreds of hours and selling it for a fraction of what your time is worth.

Dolk
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Old 03-19-2011, 10:51 PM
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To each his own, but looks like a waste of a perfectly good weapon to me.
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Old 03-20-2011, 12:10 AM
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I enjoyed the posts and the finished product. Well done.
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Old 03-20-2011, 12:47 AM
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thanks for taking the time to post. I might consider this for gold plating triggers.
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Old 03-20-2011, 5:11 PM
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Dolk,

There are tons and tons of specialty suppliers and old warehouses full of old radio parts, tubes, transformers, rectifiers, et all, You can find anything, ANYTHING, when it comes to old electronic stuff, if you search long enough.

In my case, I have a passion for the old pre-WWII and 1950's German Grundig-Majestic Radios. On the West Coast here, they are hard to find, however, on the East Coast, there is a proliferation of them, I generally have to locate my "raw" radio sets on Ebay, or some other trading network, and then, have them shipped to me. In the case of floor models, and large console models, shipping them from the East Coast can be VERY pricey. But to me, it's worth it, either I have that floor model shipped to me, or, I never have it in my collection at all because I will NEVER find one, in that good of a condition, on the West Coast. Parts, for the old German sets, are generally NOT available here in the states either, but, again, thats not a real barrier in todays internet driven world. I have many, many European suppliers who have enormous inventories of old parts, even old dual saphire phonograph needles and pickups, just EVERYTHING.... But... again... FOR A PRICE !!! This is definately NOT a hobby for someone who likes to sit on a full wallet, and keep it full !!!

And...

I ADMIRE your dedication to the purest form of restoration, it speaks very well of your passion and dedication to your calling.

And yes, you are right, restoring anything, no matter what it is, from old radios and Televisions, telephones, pistols, old metal toys, vintage cars, what-have-you, is much more, an act of love and dedication, than it is a profit oriented endeavor. People who spend thousands of hours, and tens of thousands of dollars, restoring an old Chrysler, will never get back a fraction of the time, money, or effort back when, or if, they ever sell it, which, they rarely do.

Your very right, in these matters, it's not about the money, or a profit, it's about the romance, and the passion.



Gunboat...

No waste at all !!! These are not presentation display pistols, they are intended to be used, and used ALOT !!!

I went to all this trouble to plate them, because I like my things to be "special" in some way, and there was no way on God's green Earth I was going to pay a "Pro Pater" $500.00 to do this for me !!! Especially when I can do it myself for less than HALF of that !!!

Runaways,

Don't forget to plate the hammer too !!! I think it looks really nice on a weapon when the Tigger AND the Hammer have matching finishes !!!


Redcliff,

Thanks for the appreciative post, and the vote of confidence, it is dearly appreciated. I post these kinds of articles to try and show, that even a low budget hobbyist can enjoy the finer aspects of gunning, that there are ways, to do projects yourself, that save BIG BUCKS, and... You gain so very much in the experiance, you gain skills, like plating and metal working skills, you gain self confidence, and... You gain a very nice piece or pieces, for your collection... To say NOTHING, of the PRIDE that swells in you, when you trot a buddy up to your display cases, invite him to open them up, and handle them, for their fit, feel, and balance, and then casually mention to him... "By the way, all that plating, and engraving, I do that MYSELF !!! Wana go to my garage shop and I will show you the set-ups for doing this?" -- or -- "Pick out a gun from your collection you would really love to jazz up with tripple plating, and some photo-engraving, trot it over here next weekend, I will take you through all the steps to customize it, and by Sunday Afternoon... you will have a presentation gun worth three times what it is now..."

Good Shooting Fellas !!!

Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David


A Boy... And his "Pet".......



Yeppers fellow Calgunners... The FUTURE is SECURE, as long as we keep a raisin up OUR KIDS to be like this one !!!
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Last edited by ElvinWarrior; 03-20-2011 at 5:53 PM.. Reason: added details and a photo
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Old 03-21-2011, 10:02 PM
justMike justMike is offline
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Maybe it is not an issue for black powder, but I have heard of embrittlement with steels
in relation to the plating process. Usually the parts need to be baked to remove hydrogen
that causes the weakening of the steels. Better do your homework on that for safety sake.
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Old 03-21-2011, 10:48 PM
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ElvinWarrior ElvinWarrior is offline
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JustMike,

Thanks for the "heads up" on that one !!! I will take a gander at it soon.

Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David
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Old 03-22-2011, 8:07 AM
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Kruzr Kruzr is offline
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I can't see how H2 embrittlement will be an issue with the wand plating system. It only becomes an issue with high heat which allows the hydrogen to diffuse into the metal as in a heated plating tank.

Baking at high temp for 4 hours or more allows the hydrogen to diffuse back out since the part is no longer in the solution to provide the driving force to go into the metal.
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Old 03-23-2011, 6:22 AM
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ElvinWarrior ElvinWarrior is offline
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So....

Ummm... you guys want me to bake my pistols in my kitchen oven for 4 hours at 500 degrees?

Is that what you guys are tellling me to do?

To Dispell the evil spirits of Hydrogen gas???

Hmmm....

I think the gas may pass out all on its own... actually...

Sincerely,

ElvinWarrior... aka... David
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