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  #1  
Old 02-10-2011, 2:17 PM
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Default EMP pulse vs car.

I've been looking online to see if anyone can definitively describe what effects an EMP will have on a car and so far all I can find is "that it will fry the ECU."

What about the rectifier bridge on the alternator?

What about the starter solenoid?

What about the ignition relay?

What about the ignition coil(s)?

Everyone seems to think that cars that don't have computers are magically immune to an EMP, but I submit that this isn't really the case. Cars have a large number of sensitive electronic components beyond just the ECU. With the exception of cars that have generators (instead of alternators) and are hand cranked to start, are there any cars that could survive and still be working immediately following the blast?

People who know EMP and/or cars, please chime in.

Last edited by killmime1234; 02-12-2011 at 4:19 PM.. Reason: clarify EMP
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Old 02-10-2011, 2:35 PM
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Originally Posted by killmime1234 View Post
I've been looking online to see if anyone can definitively describe what effects an EMP will have on a car and so far all I can find is "that it will fry the ECU."

What about the rectifier bridge on the alternator?

What about the starter solenoid?

What about the ignition relay?

What about the ignition coil(s)?

Everyone seems to think that cars that don't have computers are magically immune to an EMP, but I submit that this isn't really the case. Cars have a large number of sensitive electronic components beyond just the ECU. With the exception of cars that have generators (instead of alternators) and are hand cranked to start, are there any cars that could survive and still be working immediately following the blast?

People who know EMP and/or cars, please chime in.
It depends upon shot placement

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Old 02-10-2011, 3:16 PM
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Originally Posted by choprzrul View Post
It depends upon shot placement
Yuk, yuk, yuk.

I'd better specify "Electromagnet Pulse," lest I be the lucky recipient of yet another dry joke.
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Old 02-10-2011, 3:38 PM
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Electro Magnetic Pulse.

I think most solid state devices like alternators would survive if not running at the time of a pulse.
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Old 02-10-2011, 3:40 PM
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Originally Posted by choprzrul View Post
It depends upon shot placement
Glad I'm not the only one that was expecting this EMP when I clicked on the thread
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Old 02-10-2011, 4:46 PM
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everything depends with EMP. You never know. However it is the electronics that are affected. Electromagnetic parts such as starters and relays will not be affected. However most alternators have voltage regulators that are microprocessor based. These could be fried. Many older cars have alternators with electromagnetic voltage regulators. These should be fine, So if you have a 1974 VW beetle, Your radio wont work but the car will run just fine.
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Old 02-10-2011, 6:09 PM
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Is it possible that the body of a car would work as a Faraday cage? Shielding it from much of the EMP.

I really don't know much about it but this post on Survivalblog might help:
Real World EMP Effects on Motor Vehicles, by Michael Z. Williamson
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Old 02-10-2011, 6:48 PM
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I'm not an electrical engineer but the things most at risk in a car or home are the things that can be fried by static electricity - computer motherboards, whether that MB exists in a home computer, smart phone, flatscreen TV, GPS, or under the hood of a car. Outside of a car or home the things that are vulnerable are those that are connected to huge antennas (like the power grid) without benefit of breakers and surge suppression - like transformers.

Alternators, points, and coils won't even notice.
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Old 02-10-2011, 7:40 PM
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I'm not an electrical engineer but the things most at risk in a car or home are the things that can be fried by static electricity - computer motherboards, whether that MB exists in a home computer, smart phone, flatscreen TV, GPS, or under the hood of a car. Outside of a car or home the things that are vulnerable are those that are connected to huge antennas (like the power grid) without benefit of breakers and surge suppression - like transformers.

Alternators, points, and coils won't even notice.

Not quite true - Back in the sixties the US did a test 800 miles south of Hawaii - Satrfish Prime (I believe). I believe they detonate a nuke about 400 miles up. It took out street lights, garage door openers, security systems. Remember this was be transistors. Soviets did several tests and produced even more conclusive proof that harden systems were vulnerable.

Car is not a faraday cage, 1st its not grounded and second all the electrical components are grounded to the frame. It's a big antenna. Coil, alternator, spark plugs, distributor should be immune i.e. pre 70 car is good to go.
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Old 02-10-2011, 9:51 PM
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0odJKYTzXg8

Looks like it will stop the car...
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Old 02-10-2011, 11:04 PM
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Originally Posted by corporateslave View Post
Is it possible that the body of a car would work as a Faraday cage? Shielding it from much of the EMP.
No, because as LMT4ME pointed out your car isn't properly grounded and those sensitive components aren't shielded within that cage, they're part of it.

You could perhaps park your cars in a shielded underground garage like George Lucas has at Skywalker Ranch for his Tie Fighters and whatnot, but you probably don't have an army of Ewok slaves to build that for you like George does.

The poor man's route might be to keep a spare starter solenoid, generator, fuses and other possibly susceptible components stored in a small faraday cage as a fallback measure. The cheapest faraday cage I'm aware of is an old microwave oven with the ground wire grounded to something other than an electrical outlet, like an actual ground spike. No need to increase the risk by plugging it into an outlet.
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Old 02-10-2011, 11:46 PM
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Originally Posted by LMT4ME View Post
Not quite true - Back in the sixties the US did a test 800 miles south of Hawaii - Satrfish Prime (I believe). I believe they detonate a nuke about 400 miles up. It took out street lights, garage door openers, security systems. Remember this was be transistors. Soviets did several tests and produced even more conclusive proof that harden systems were vulnerable.

Car is not a faraday cage, 1st its not grounded and second all the electrical components are grounded to the frame. It's a big antenna. Coil, alternator, spark plugs, distributor should be immune i.e. pre 70 car is good to go.
We're on the same page. Pre 70s cars are safe but streetlights are on that big antenna - the grid. In the early 60s surge suppressors weren't even thought of and transistors weren't all that common. You'd find them in expensive portable radios but the TV and the home stereo had tubes - immune from EMP. I'm old - our first TV was a 10 or 12" console with a gigantic magnifying glass and Ike was still president. A few years later as a 1st grader I lived through the deadly serious cuban missile crisis duck and cover drills and there were very serious doubts that we'd live to see 7. Popular Science and Popular Mechanics etc used to have stories on how to harden your house against the blast and everything from basic backyard shelters to fashionable bomb shelters for the rich and shameless and how you might have to defend your shelter against friends and neighbors. I'd sit on my grandpa's lap and he'd read them to me while I looked at the pictures. He even kept lots emergency rats. In other words I grew up with this stuff.
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Old 02-10-2011, 11:55 PM
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No, because as LMT4ME pointed out your car isn't properly grounded and those sensitive components aren't shielded within that cage, they're part of it.

You could perhaps park your cars in a shielded underground garage like George Lucas has at Skywalker Ranch for his Tie Fighters and whatnot, but you probably don't have an army of Ewok slaves to build that for you like George does.

The poor man's route might be to keep a spare starter solenoid, generator, fuses and other possibly susceptible components stored in a small faraday cage as a fallback measure. The cheapest faraday cage I'm aware of is an old microwave oven with the ground wire grounded to something other than an electrical outlet, like an actual ground spike. No need to increase the risk by plugging it into an outlet.
The poor mans solution is to find a pre 1974 truck with a coil and points. Unless the blast is close enough to melt the tires odds are it'll start. But keep a spare points and condenser just to be safe. Think about how much power it takes to blow 100 amp alternator or a starter solenoid.
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Old 02-11-2011, 3:40 AM
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Good input guys, keep it coming. I'm gathering that, at least if the people who claim they know what they're talking about actually do, I can count on the starter solenoid and ignition coils to be intact. I'm pretty sure the rectifier bridge for most (if not all) cars that have an alternator is still susceptible since it primarily consists of diodes which are about as fragile as transistors.

What about the ignition relay? It's basically an electromagnetic solenoid, but on a smaller scale than that of a starter solenoid. This one just connects a high voltage circuit when activated. Anybody have any thoughts?

Also, although I'd trust calgunners with darn near anything over the average civi, I'm still curious does anyone have any sources (i.e. books, articles, scientific journals, etc)?
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Old 02-11-2011, 8:15 AM
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Any active component will most likely be toast. It would likely depend on the design of the car's quasi finite state machine. I'm an electrical engineer but no automotive expert so I'm not sure how all the electrical components are tied together. But I would imagine there is some kind of 'safe to start' finite state machine that receives signals from sensors in the brake lines, engine temp, etc that determines its OK to start the car. These signals require a lot of conditioning to maintain their integrity from start to finish which requires a lot of circuity that could be damaged from EMP/EMI. I could be way off but that's how things are done in my industry, I assume its similar for the automotive industry.
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Old 02-11-2011, 9:56 AM
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Get a mechanically injected diesel. Zero electricity needed to run. If the starter dies, you can bump start it or use compressed air.
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Old 02-11-2011, 10:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by killmime1234 View Post
Also, although I'd trust calgunners with darn near anything over the average civi, I'm still curious does anyone have any sources (i.e. books, articles, scientific journals, etc)?
Here's a good source: http://www.empcommission.org/reports.php

Although it's a novel, I also found the book One Second After to be very informative on this subject.

Regarding circuit breakers and surge protectors, common thinking is that they would be of no use to stop damage from an EMP because of the milliseconds it takes for them to trip. Apparently one of the aspects of an EMP is the speed at which it travels.
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Old 02-11-2011, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Joewy View Post
everything depends with EMP. You never know. However it is the electronics that are affected. Electromagnetic parts such as starters and relays will not be affected. However most alternators have voltage regulators that are microprocessor based. These could be fried. Many older cars have alternators with electromagnetic voltage regulators. These should be fine, So if you have a 1974 VW beetle, Your radio wont work but the car will run just fine.
So my truck and motorcycle are screwed, my '56 VW is safe.
I know someone who claims to have built a HERF gun, showed me schematics but he is 5150, homeless half the time and loony all the time so I don't believe him. Claims he's knocked out a car with it before.
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Old 02-11-2011, 11:40 AM
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Any active component will most likely be toast. It would likely depend on the design of the car's quasi finite state machine. I'm an electrical engineer but no automotive expert so I'm not sure how all the electrical components are tied together. But I would imagine there is some kind of 'safe to start' finite state machine that receives signals from sensors in the brake lines, engine temp, etc that determines its OK to start the car. These signals require a lot of conditioning to maintain their integrity from start to finish which requires a lot of circuity that could be damaged from EMP/EMI. I could be way off but that's how things are done in my industry, I assume its similar for the automotive industry.
That would be a modern computer controlled engine management system - you can fry the computer inside with a static charge that's barely noticeable to a human.

If you go back to a pre 1970 car technology with a 100-150 amp alternator or generator and calculate what it takes to fry that device, and what it takes to burn points (protected by the condenser) beyond use, and fry a condenser (a fairly beefy little capacitor) designed to absorb a good sized charge, or what it takes to fry a 20,000 volt coil, or fry a heavy duty starter solenoid found the a GM truck. I'm not saying it can't be done but I think you'd have to be so close that the driver doesn't need headlights because he already glows in the dark.

Open questions for everybody:
  1. How did Professor Oppenheimer and General Farrell get home from the Trinity test?
  2. How did the crew of Enola Gay get back to base?




Hint: They didn't walk.
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Old 02-11-2011, 1:19 PM
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The poor mans solution is to find a pre 1974 truck with a coil and points. Unless the blast is close enough to melt the tires odds are it'll start. But keep a spare points and condenser just to be safe. Think about how much power it takes to blow 100 amp alternator or a starter solenoid.
That is how I keep my old 68 pickup.... it has an electronic ignition (aftermarket), but I keep points and a few tools in the truck. I also keep the battery when I am not driving it. I also keep a spare solenoid and distributor laying around.
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Old 02-11-2011, 1:56 PM
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Originally Posted by sholling View Post
Open questions for everybody:
  1. How did Professor Oppenheimer and General Farrell get home from the Trinity test?
  2. How did the crew of Enola Gay get back to base?




Hint: They didn't walk.
Good questions, but a little misleading too. The bombs used on Japan were relatively low yield and not "tuned" for maximum EMP production, but rather for maximum physical damage. Nor were they dropped at very high altitude for maximum EMP coverage range, but again for maximum damage inflicted on the cities.

Some countries (Russia, China, Iran, the US) have all done R&D on EMP tuned nukes and incorporated them into their war plans. It's hypothesized that as few as two high-yield EMP tuned nukes detonated at high altitude in strategic locations over the US could effectively zap the entire country.

Suffice to say, yes, older tech is more resistant to EMP, but is not entirely immune either.
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Old 02-11-2011, 4:48 PM
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I know someone who claims to have built a HERF gun, showed me schematics but he is 5150, homeless half the time and loony all the time so I don't believe him. Claims he's knocked out a car with it before.
That's theoretically possible, is this his rig?



You can buy schematics, parts or fully assembled EMP/HERF generators here. Even a small one should be capable of knocking out a car's EFI computer if you were to open the hood and get very close to it. To do what they show in the video you'd need a lot more horsepower.
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Old 02-11-2011, 5:09 PM
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Get a mechanically injected diesel. Zero electricity needed to run. If the starter dies, you can bump start it or use compressed air.
I've got one. It will even run on waste vegetable oil.
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Old 02-11-2011, 5:31 PM
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Good info on a mechanically injected diesel. Aren't the new was have electronic fuel injection? BTW a surge protector will not help the transient spike of an EMP is too fast.
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Old 02-11-2011, 8:55 PM
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Mechanically injected bio-diesel FTW?

So large capacitors are resistant to EMP it sounds like?

It has also just occurred to me what an investment a little pull-start two-seater go kart would be. The only thing I need are some spark plugs kept in the microwave!

And regarding:
Quote:
Originally Posted by sholling View Post
Open questions for everybody:
  1. How did Professor Oppenheimer and General Farrell get home from the Trinity test?
  2. How did the crew of Enola Gay get back to base?
...from what I have read (this is from wikipedia so take it with a grain of salt), EMP "...only occurs within the severe blast radius for detonations below about 10 km altitude." So basically even if the cars around you still exist in this zone, you probably won't; and thus, my question pertains to the more practical situation in which a massive EMP is generated by an upper atmosphere detonation.

Last edited by killmime1234; 02-11-2011 at 8:58 PM..
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Old 02-11-2011, 10:51 PM
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Good questions, but a little misleading too. The bombs used on Japan were relatively low yield and not "tuned" for maximum EMP production, but rather for maximum physical damage. Nor were they dropped at very high altitude for maximum EMP coverage range, but again for maximum damage inflicted on the cities.

Some countries (Russia, China, Iran, the US) have all done R&D on EMP tuned nukes and incorporated them into their war plans. It's hypothesized that as few as two high-yield EMP tuned nukes detonated at high altitude in strategic locations over the US could effectively zap the entire country.

Suffice to say, yes, older tech is more resistant to EMP, but is not entirely immune either.
Low altitude nuke detonations (Hiroshima/Nagasaki /ICBMs etc) causes localized EMP. If a nuke is detonated 1km above the ground the EMP will only travel a very limited distances (several100s of miles). An EMP burst altitude of 400-600 km will travel thousand of miles. In addition, a high altitude burst will activate the ionosphere enhancing the effect. One burst above Wisconsin could take out most of the US. There was a US Congressional committee that looked into an EMP attack. It concluded that we are in good shape = kiss our a** goodbye. They promptly stopped reviewing the issue since there was no reasonable way of dealing with the scenario. Interestingly, other counties (India for example) has acknowledged a preemptive EMP strike as one it's most gravest concerns.
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Old 02-12-2011, 12:12 AM
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Originally Posted by killmime1234 View Post
...from what I have read (this is from wikipedia so take it with a grain of salt), EMP "...only occurs within the severe blast radius for detonations below about 10 km altitude." So basically even if the cars around you still exist in this zone, you probably won't; and thus, my question pertains to the more practical situation in which a massive EMP is generated by an upper atmosphere detonation.
I'm a big believer in the threat of EMP and have endlessly debated those that claim it's overblown but I just don't see a mechanism for EMP damaging a pre-1970s car. Computer controlled devices and cars yes easily. Transformers and streetlights yes because tens or hundreds of thousands of miles of the electrical grid would act as a gigantic collection antenna.

The idea (no disrespect intended to anybody) of keeping spark plugs in a microwave to protect them from EMP is a great example of an overreaction. Spark plugs make their living turning a 10,000-150,000 volt charge from the coil into a spark. If it can handle that thousands of times a minute it'll deal with an EMP burst just fine. At worst keep a spare condenser and coil and be prepared in the very unlikely event that you need to hot wire and/or push start it. Better yet disconnect the battery and ground strap on the "TEOTWAWKI-mobile" and store it with the body/frame grounded.

I would expect to lose some or all of the electronics in the house, any portable electronics.
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Old 02-12-2011, 10:46 AM
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This is a nearly impossible question to answer, though you could attack it statistically if you had the numbers.

An EMP's strength drops with distance and with a variety of other factors, so it's difficult to assume a field strength.

To be shielded, a part doesn't need to be completely enclosed by a Faraday cage, it only needs to be shielded from the pulse, which is traveling in a straight line (barring magnetic field disruptions and reflections), by the car's steel. For instance, sensitive parts under the hood are better protected than, say, a radio that could be seen through the window glass from the direction of the explosion, or dashboard components behind plastic.

Motorcycles are going to be in worse shape, since they have little steel around their control components.

To improve the survivability of pre-electronics cars, you could do simple stuff like shielding the coil and voltage regulator. Yes, the coil generates high voltage, but a pulse could induce high enough currents to burn the fine wires out if you were close, and a shield would be easy to make.

Spark plugs are not at risk, and most car wiring isn't either.

In other words, this is something that's almost impossible to plan against, except for some proactive shielding. How about a metallicized car cover? Anything that drops the pulse field strength will increase the odds of survivability.
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Old 02-12-2011, 10:53 AM
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fear of emp is like being afraid of aliens and zombies

they only happen if a nuke is set of at high altitude
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Old 02-12-2011, 11:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by choprzrul View Post
It depends upon shot placement

I lol'd
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Old 02-12-2011, 11:59 AM
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Some excerpts from the emp commission reports:

"We tested a sample of 37 cars in an EMP simulation laboratory, with automobile vintages ranging from 1986 through 2002.... Twenty-five automobiles exhibited malfunctions that could be considered only a nuisance (e.g., blinking dashboard lights) and did not require driver intervention to correct. Eight of the 37 cars tested did not exhibit any anomalous response... Approximately 10 percent or more of the automobiles exposed to higher field levels may experience serious EMP effects, including engine stall, that require driver intervention to correct"

"The trucks ranged from gasoline-powered pickup trucks to large diesel-
powered tractors. Truck vintages ranged from 1991 to 2003...Of the trucks that were not running during EMP exposure, none were subsequently
affected during our test. Thirteen of the 18 trucks exhibited a response while running. Most seriously, three of the truck motors stopped. Two could be restarted immediately, but one required towing to a garage for repair. The other 10 trucks that responded exhibited relatively minor temporary responses that did not require driver intervention to correct. Five of the 18 trucks tested did not exhibit any anomalous response up to field
strengths of approximately 50 kV/m.... Approximately 15 percent or more of the trucks will experience engine stall, sometimes with permanent damage that the driver cannot correct."


I think you guys are overestimating the effects on an EMP on cars. Most of the arguments made here are purely theoretical, based on actual testing most vehicles will still be drivable after being hit with an EMP.
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Old 02-12-2011, 12:35 PM
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cover everything with foil!

this guy does a real good job explaining EMP protection

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Old 02-12-2011, 3:30 PM
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My 1977 Fj40 is immune to the EMP. Accept the Springfield, of course. I decided to go with the FN9 or FN40 instead of the EMP 9. Can't have the EMP in 40 in the State of Confusion.
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Old 02-12-2011, 4:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bohoki View Post
fear of emp is like being afraid of aliens and zombies
...um, yes... Are you not afraid of aliens and zombies?


Quote:
Originally Posted by corporateslave View Post
Some excerpts from the emp commission reports:

"We tested a sample of 37 cars in an EMP simulation laboratory, with automobile vintages ranging from 1986 through 2002.... Twenty-five automobiles exhibited malfunctions that could be considered only a nuisance (e.g., blinking dashboard lights) and did not require driver intervention to correct. Eight of the 37 cars tested did not exhibit any anomalous response... Approximately 10 percent or more of the automobiles exposed to higher field levels may experience serious EMP effects, including engine stall, that require driver intervention to correct"

"The trucks ranged from gasoline-powered pickup trucks to large diesel-
powered tractors. Truck vintages ranged from 1991 to 2003...Of the trucks that were not running during EMP exposure, none were subsequently
affected during our test. Thirteen of the 18 trucks exhibited a response while running. Most seriously, three of the truck motors stopped. Two could be restarted immediately, but one required towing to a garage for repair. The other 10 trucks that responded exhibited relatively minor temporary responses that did not require driver intervention to correct. Five of the 18 trucks tested did not exhibit any anomalous response up to field
strengths of approximately 50 kV/m.... Approximately 15 percent or more of the trucks will experience engine stall, sometimes with permanent damage that the driver cannot correct."


I think you guys are overestimating the effects on an EMP on cars. Most of the arguments made here are purely theoretical, based on actual testing most vehicles will still be drivable after being hit with an EMP.
Those are some interesting statistics. Of the model year's tested, a large percentage of those would have to be computer controlled. This kind of turns the the stereotypical "all micro-electronics destroyed" situation on it's head.

It makes me wonder if my cell phone would stay on in that kind of situation. I have to imagine the kinds of measures taken to prevent electrostatic damage to the phone's internal may work as a protective barrier to an EMP blast. It also occurs to me that the antenna might channel the EMP blast directly to the circuitry, though.
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Old 02-12-2011, 5:20 PM
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yea there is a lot of conjecture jsut because something can do something doesn't mean it will do it

the army's requirement it that it wont do something

kind of like how a microwave may interfere with a pacemaker but it probably never will
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Old 02-13-2011, 10:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corporateslave View Post
Some excerpts from the emp commission reports:

"We tested a sample of 37 cars in an EMP simulation laboratory, with automobile vintages ranging from 1986 through 2002.... Twenty-five automobiles exhibited malfunctions that could be considered only a nuisance (e.g., blinking dashboard lights) and did not require driver intervention to correct. Eight of the 37 cars tested did not exhibit any anomalous response... Approximately 10 percent or more of the automobiles exposed to higher field levels may experience serious EMP effects, including engine stall, that require driver intervention to correct"

"The trucks ranged from gasoline-powered pickup trucks to large diesel-
powered tractors. Truck vintages ranged from 1991 to 2003...Of the trucks that were not running during EMP exposure, none were subsequently
affected during our test. Thirteen of the 18 trucks exhibited a response while running. Most seriously, three of the truck motors stopped. Two could be restarted immediately, but one required towing to a garage for repair. The other 10 trucks that responded exhibited relatively minor temporary responses that did not require driver intervention to correct. Five of the 18 trucks tested did not exhibit any anomalous response up to field
strengths of approximately 50 kV/m.... Approximately 15 percent or more of the trucks will experience engine stall, sometimes with permanent damage that the driver cannot correct."


I think you guys are overestimating the effects on an EMP on cars. Most of the arguments made here are purely theoretical, based on actual testing most vehicles will still be drivable after being hit with an EMP.
interesting. also people need to realize that books like Patriot and One Second After represent very worst case scenarios.

I would imagine that cars parked in lower levels of reinforced concrete parking structures would be well shielded.
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Old 02-13-2011, 1:43 PM
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I think it is still worth it to be prepared with backup parts if you have the means to do so. For a person like me with limited resources, other preparations take priority. Even though most cars subjected to the tests survived the EMP, I will still likely buy backup electronics for my car once my other preparations are in order.
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Last edited by corporateslave; 02-13-2011 at 1:45 PM..
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Old 02-13-2011, 8:15 PM
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From the Congressional Research Consul

http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/natsec/RL32544.pdf

High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) and
High Power Microwave (HPM) Devices:
Threat Assessments

“A high altitude nuclear explosion (that creates HEMP) produces three major
energy components that arrive in sequence, and which have measurably different
effects that can be cumulatively damaging to electronic equipment. The first energy
component is the initial energy shockwave, which lasts up to 1 microsecond, and is
similar to extremely intense static electricity that can overload circuitry for every
electronic device that is within line of sight of the burst. A secondary energy
component then arrives, which has characteristics that are similar to a lightning
strike. By itself, this second energy component might not be an issue for some
critical infrastructure equipment, if anti-lightning protective measures are already in
place. However, the rise time of the first component is so rapid and intense that it
can destroy many protective measures, allowing the second component to further
disrupt the electronic equipment.”

“EMP attack directed against the United States involving no violent destruction, nor
instant death for large numbers of U.S. citizens, may not necessarily evoke massive
nuclear retaliation by the U.S. military, where, for example, large numbers of
innocent civilians of a nation with a rogue leader might be killed. Such a perceived
lower risk of assured destruction by the United States, and widespread knowledge
about the vulnerability of U.S. civilian and military computers to the effects of an
EMP attack, could actually create a new incentive for other countries or terrorist
groups to develop, or perhaps purchase, a nuclear capability.”

“The study concluded that an EMP attack affecting the Baltimore-Washington-
Richmond region could result in economic output loss potentially exceeding $770
billion, or 7% of the nation’s annual gross domestic product. Even under the most
favorable assumptions, including both shielded and unshielded critical infrastructure,
an EMP might still result in damage that would require one month of recovery and
economic loss of $9 billion and $34 billion respectively.

In the worst case, according to the study, not only is the damage from EMP
widespread, but the duration of disrepair lasts for years. In such cases, there are
numerous complicating factors that could slow the recovery process. The quantity
of replacement equipment needed to restore the economy may quickly exhaust
readily available supplies and, in extreme cases, existing manufacturing capacity. In
such cases, the availability of skilled labor to replace and restore key infrastructure
elements may also be in extraordinarily short supply. High-altitude EMP would also affect much larger parts of the region than the immediate Baltimore-Washington Richmond area, further complicating recovery efforts. It is unlikely that restoration would occur in an orderly, linear fashion. More likely, restoration efforts would start slowly and gather speed as basic infrastructure is gradually brought on line.”

“In 2004, the EMP Commission held the collective the opinion that DOD had not
engaged in any tabletop exercises and simulations that anticipate and EMP attack.
In fact, an EMP commissioner observed that over the past 40 years, DOD has tended
to “not introduce EMP attack into exercise scenarios or game scenarios because it
tends to end the game, and that is not a good sign”.(38)”

Ref (38) Dr. Lowell Wood, testimony before the House Committee on Armed Services, H.A.S.C
No. 108-37, July 22, 2004, p.23.

My input not study - Note Wood is one of the pre eminent scientists in the US – he invented xray laser and Regans star wars science that brought down the USSR.

Last edited by LMT4ME; 02-13-2011 at 8:21 PM..
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