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  #1  
Old 09-04-2009, 7:28 PM
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Default nitrogen filled scope?

what is the purpose of the nitrogen in the scope? also I'm flying home tomorrow from texas and I just bought a Super sniper scope. I have to check it and was wondering if the cargo bay isn't pressurized will it hurt my scope as I'm not sure if there are seals that can rupture
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Old 09-04-2009, 8:21 PM
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I believe the nitrogen is added to ensure that the inside of the scope is free from moisture.
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Old 09-04-2009, 8:26 PM
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It is an inert gas that also prevents your scope from fogging up on the inside due to temperature and humidity changes.
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Old 09-04-2009, 8:30 PM
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It is fine in the cargo hold. Mine have flown to Alaska, Africa, Texas, etc. with never a problem.
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Old 09-04-2009, 9:26 PM
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Nitrogen also does not expand and contract as much in temperature change. Scopes should be airtight so contracting and expanding gases can cause changes in scopes.
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Old 09-04-2009, 9:35 PM
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thanks
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Old 09-05-2009, 2:22 AM
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If'n you're interested in a KILL FLASH for your baby, check out THIS LINK.

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Old 09-05-2009, 8:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darksands View Post
Nitrogen also does not expand and contract as much in temperature change. Scopes should be airtight so contracting and expanding gases can cause changes in scopes.
I teach chemistry so I can't let this go on any further.

Nitrogen follows the ideal gas law (PV=nRT) as do all other gases. This means all gases expand and contract identically with temperature and pressure. Deviations from this law can occur on planet Earth, but at conditions extreme enough that you won't be worried about your scope!

Nitrogen is the cheapest pure gas to produce, since air is about 80% nitrogen. It is, for our intents and purposes, inert (non-reactive). However, nitrogen is not as inert as noble gases like helium, neon, argon, and krypton. Nitrogen does react with oxygen at high temperature, but again, that's scope-melting temperature.

Noble gases are expensive. Also, helium and neon--the cheapest ones--are smaller than nitrogen, which creates a problem with diffusivity (the tendency to diffuse or leak). Smaller gases can leak faster than larger gases, which is probably what darksands was trying to explain. It's like how some farts travel across the room real quick, while others kind of linger in one area. Helium is like the former, and nitrogen is more like a heavy, greasy fart.

Nothing is truly "airtight," so using a bigger, less diffusive gas will slow leakage and the resulting intake of moisture and oxygen. This means that for long-term scope protection, helium would be horrible. Neon and nitrogen are comparable, but the nod goes to nitrogen.

Expensive scope makers will often use argon and/or krypton to fill their scopes. Both are much less diffusive than nitrogen, and according to the laws of physics, should provide the most years of protection. I say "should provide" because the rate of leakage probably depends on construction and assembly standards just as much, if not more, than the type of inert gas used for manufacture.
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Old 09-05-2009, 10:22 AM
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Thanks Mr. Wizard. That explained everything.
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Old 09-05-2009, 11:11 AM
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Don't mention it.

And if it didn't violate the TOS, I could explain to you how babies are really made.
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Old 09-05-2009, 1:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stringer View Post
I teach chemistry so I can't let this go on any further.
Smaller gases can leak faster than larger gases... It's like how some farts travel across the room real quick, while others kind of linger in one area. Helium is like the former, and nitrogen is more like a heavy, greasy fart.
Nice analogy String! Your a good teacher....
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Old 09-05-2009, 1:52 PM
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Old 09-05-2009, 11:59 PM
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well I wish I would have known all this before I got home... crap
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Old 09-06-2009, 7:11 AM
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Wow my head hurts now. Thank you!
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