Calguns.net  

Home My iTrader Join the NRA Donate to CGSSA Sponsors CGN Google Search
CA Semiauto Ban(AW)ID Flowchart CA Handgun Ban ID Flowchart CA Shotgun Ban ID Flowchart
Go Back   Calguns.net > OUTDOORS, HUNTING AND SURVIVAL > Camping, Hiking and Outdoor Activities
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Camping, Hiking and Outdoor Activities Camping, hiking, and other outdoor activities within.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-28-2016, 1:44 PM
robodeer's Avatar
robodeer robodeer is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 470
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default Sleeping bag temp recommendations (Sierras CA & Oregon)

I'm thinking of getting a new, lighter weight sleeping bag for backpacking all up and down the Sierras in CA along with Oregon as well. Mainly spring-fall. Should I be looking at a 20F bag? Would a cheaper mid-30s synthetic bag be enough? I have a cheaper bag currently and it seems to be fine most of the time. Looking for more data points & opinions.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-28-2016, 2:57 PM
canative's Avatar
canative canative is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: San Jose
Posts: 863
iTrader: 13 / 100%
Default

I got this one on sale at Big5: Suisse Sport Summit 0-5 Degree Mummy Bag. I've been up in the Sierra's in about 20 degree weather and it works fine for me. Inexpensive.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-28-2016, 4:58 PM
Lugiahua Lugiahua is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,560
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Higher end bags generally have three ratings
- minimum/low: Lowest number you can sleep without risk of hypothermia, but not going to very comfortable
- Comfortable: you can sleep relatively comfortable above this temperature
-Maximum/high: It would be too hot sleep above this number

Point out that male and female don't share same rating, I believe that female feels colder in the same bag.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-28-2016, 6:29 PM
Carcassonne's Avatar
Carcassonne Carcassonne is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,311
iTrader: 17 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by robodeer View Post
I'm thinking of getting a new, lighter weight sleeping bag for backpacking all up and down the Sierras in CA along with Oregon as well. Mainly spring-fall. Should I be looking at a 20F bag? Would a cheaper mid-30s synthetic bag be enough? I have a cheaper bag currently and it seems to be fine most of the time. Looking for more data points & opinions.

Temperature ratings are not the same between different manufacturers. I have had -20F bags that made my shiver at +30F. I had REI bags, and they are garbage. I also had a Northface Inferno -40F that felt like I was sleeping in an oven while I was sleeping on snow with no tent or cover - just a 1/2" ground pad.

Wiggy's bags use to be good. I do not know if they are still any good. I have 2 for backpacking: One +40F Nautilus and one -20F Ultima Thule. The +40F works as rated. I have not had the UT down to -20F yet, so I don't know if it is rated correctly. You can by an inner and outer bag, and have 3 bags in one: A hot weather bag, a cold weather bag, and when both are combined you have a freezing weather bag.

http://www.wiggys.com

http://www.wiggys.com/specials/

Stay away from down unless you are rich and can throw money away, or you have a specific dry short (1 week) duration trip.


Quote:
http://www.wiggys.com/why-lamilite-insulation/

Also, it is extremely important for the moisture not to condense in the insulation. If this occurs when temperatures are below freezing, frost buildup can severely reduce the thickness of your insulation, as occurs with down, or the moisture simply freezes as in any other sleeping bag and adds weight.

Refer to the Steger Expedition to the North Pole in July 1986. They used 15 pound chopped staple fiberfill insulated bags that accumulated 35 pounds of ice. The fiberfill used in those bags was Quallofil, a fiber produced by DuPont Co. Even though the fiber is silicone treated, the fact that it was so densely packed in by the quilting prevented any flow of moisture while in a vapor state.
A ground pad is important. Stay away from air or inflatable pads. Get a closed cell foam pad that is at east 1/2" thick. They take up more space than an inflatable pad, but are light weight and worth the space they take up.


.
__________________
.

Be sure to ask your doctor if depression, rectal bleeding, and suicide are right for you.

In the United States a person's expertise on a subject is inversely proportional to their knowledge of the subject: The less they know about something, the more they become an expert on it.

.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-28-2016, 6:38 PM
Elgatodeacero Elgatodeacero is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 117
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

http://featheredfriends.com/down-sle...son/mummy.html

Get the best. Not that expensive. Superior quality and craftsmanship, USA made, super light.

I have the Swallow model. Its rated to 20 degrees. Best 3 season bag I have ever seen or used.

Edited to add, if you only camp and hike in the summer, get the 30 degree level bag from Featheredfriends.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-28-2016, 7:31 PM
Archon_g24's Avatar
Archon_g24 Archon_g24 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Anaheim
Posts: 259
iTrader: 23 / 100%
Default

I use a marmot 20 degree bag for most seasons. At altitude in the sierras, you may want something warmer. The bag is just one part of it. What you wear to sleep needs to be taken into consideration. Cotton will soak with seat and you'll wake up freezing. Wool or some synthetics work well and will keep you warm.
__________________
NRA, CRPA, and RWVA member.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-28-2016, 7:53 PM
Driftwood Driftwood is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 228
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Default

I have Mountin Hardware phantom 0 degree. It's been comfortable in the snow with and without a tent. (not the top of everest snow but end of D-7 season at the snow line.)
My tent is a Big Agnes Seed House 1. Together they weigh 5.2 lbs with bags, stakes, etc...

I use an xl inflatable pad. Can't remember what it is but it rolls up to about the size of a soda can and a half. When you go out of state to hunt and spearfish the size matters on the airlines, doesn't hurt on the trail or morotcycle either.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-28-2016, 7:54 PM
sacrvrrat sacrvrrat is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 49
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

A good 20 degree bag will be fine for the sierras through fall. Wiggys are fine but weigh a lot. If you are carrying it in on your back, down is the way to go. If you are going to coastal OR a lot you may want a synthetic. Might also think about a quilt.

Western mountaineering, enlightened equipment, feathered friends, north face, marmont, katabatic, valendre, are all top notch. Kelty is probably the best bang for your buck.


Closed cell foam works great, but so do the blow up pads. Love my x-therm.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-29-2016, 7:51 AM
mosin of nagareth's Avatar
mosin of nagareth mosin of nagareth is offline
CGN/CGSSA Contributor
CGN Contributor
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 172
iTrader: 16 / 100%
Default

I'm real happy with my Marmot bag. Well made, good price and Marmot stands by their work. If something goes wrong, they'll fix it.
Same for Kelty. If I recall correctly, Kelty bags are made in Atlanta. (Call them to double check though) Their warranty seems to top Marmot's. It's an almost anything for any reason warranty that lasts a lifetime. Really nice people at Kelty too.
Depending on what you're planning, you might look into liners and bivy sacks as supplements (not replacements) for a lower-temp-rated bag if weight is an important factor.
__________________
"Man is an animal whose dreams come true and kill him." --James Tiptree Jr.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-29-2016, 7:56 AM
Bainter1212's Avatar
Bainter1212 Bainter1212 is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 3,346
iTrader: 42 / 100%
Default

If you are cheap and don't care too much about weight, a mil surplus "extreme cold weather" bag will pretty much do you in any temps.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-29-2016, 8:09 AM
glockman19's Avatar
glockman19 glockman19 is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 9,678
iTrader: 18 / 100%
Default

I have a Kelty Cosmic Down 20 degree bag. It has been good down into the low teens.
__________________
Our country DOES have a gun problem - guns are protected and Democrats really, really don't like it. It's a problem alright. The only problem is that it's *their* problem. -IVC
"There's a difference between an open mind and an empty one" -Fjold
Malo periculosam libertatem quam quietam servitutem
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-29-2016, 11:35 AM
kemasa's Avatar
kemasa kemasa is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Ventura County, CA
Posts: 7,117
iTrader: 5 / 100%
Default

There is no standard testing in terms of temp. ratings and it seems like some are just made up. I saw one company which said that their bags were rated to the temp. if you had a tent, a pad, a hat, etc. Each tent is different, so it also makes it meaningless, but if would keep you warm to that temp. if you were in an RV with the heater on as well.

Some of the ratings, like for the military bags, are the temp. that you won't die, not that you will be able to sleep.

I like the Stephenson bags as they are warm, roomy and the design is quite nice, but on the down side are quite expensive and there are improvements you can make in them (which I have done). A friend sleep in his outside in Alaska in the winter and while he sleeps cold, he was warm in the bag.
__________________
Kemasa.
FFL Transfer/Special Order Dealer since 1993.
Net-FFL list maintainer.

Never try to teach a pig to sing. You waste your time and you annoy the pig. - Robert A. Heinlein
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-29-2016, 12:03 PM
Reecek's Avatar
Reecek Reecek is offline
CGN/CGSSA Contributor
CGN Contributor
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Albany
Posts: 497
iTrader: 9 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by glockman19 View Post
I have a Kelty Cosmic Down 20 degree bag. It has been good down into the low teens.

I have this bag as well and it is great! You can usually get it at Sierra Trading Post for a good price.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-29-2016, 12:28 PM
Lugiahua Lugiahua is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,560
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kemasa View Post
Some of the ratings, like for the military bags, are the temp. that you won't die, not that you will be able to sleep.
.
Also, some company rates them as "naked temperature"
(sleeper wearing only underwear)
Others might rated it wearing full clothing...

Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-29-2016, 4:00 PM
Surferchris1 Surferchris1 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Roseville
Posts: 147
iTrader: 13 / 100%
Default

There actually IS a standard, consistent, verifiable, lab tested, and legally binding (in Europe), rating system for sleeping bag warmth.

It's EN13537

Even though it's a European standard, many high quality bags for sale here will reference it. It's the first thing I look for when shopping for a bag. If it doesn't have an EU13537 rating, the temp rating is totally made up, and often wildly exaggerated.

I've had North Face (got stolen in Chico), Kelty (left behind in Mexico), Stoic (caught fire in Pismo), bags in the past. Right now my two go-to bags are both Mont-Bell spiral down huggers and I love them! I have a 15 degree and a 30 degree. Generally for the shoulder seasons, I take the 30 and my wife uses the 15. When there's snow on the ground I take the 15 and my wife stays home.

The Mont Bell 30 degree is right at 1.5 lbs, compresses super small, I've slept comfortably without a tent down into the mid 20s, and with a little shopping I found it for under $200! I use this bag the most.

I don't think I could just have one sleeping bag. I'm eyeing this 8oz quilt from Feathered Friends for nice weather summer trips.

Other considerations: Down isn't the best choice for every trip or activity, but I love down and to me it's worth the extra effort to keep it dry. Your gear is a system, an insulated pad makes a huge difference, so do the layers you do (or don't) sleep in, so does your tent or bivy bag. Seriously, how well your pad insulates is just as important as how well your bag insulates!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-29-2016, 5:05 PM
Carcassonne's Avatar
Carcassonne Carcassonne is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,311
iTrader: 17 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Surferchris1 View Post
There actually IS a standard, consistent, verifiable, lab tested, and legally binding (in Europe), rating system for sleeping bag warmth.

It's EN13537
Quote:
A European criterion for sleeping bags came into effect on January 1, 2005.

I haven't purchased a new bag since before 2000. I never heard of that rating system. I remember they use to use a copper maniquin and measure the heat loss.



.
__________________
.

Be sure to ask your doctor if depression, rectal bleeding, and suicide are right for you.

In the United States a person's expertise on a subject is inversely proportional to their knowledge of the subject: The less they know about something, the more they become an expert on it.

.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-29-2016, 5:16 PM
Carcassonne's Avatar
Carcassonne Carcassonne is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,311
iTrader: 17 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lugiahua View Post
Also, some company rates them as "naked temperature"
(sleeper wearing only underwear)
Others might rated it wearing full clothing...
A tent or other cover makes a big difference during the colder windy season.


.
__________________
.

Be sure to ask your doctor if depression, rectal bleeding, and suicide are right for you.

In the United States a person's expertise on a subject is inversely proportional to their knowledge of the subject: The less they know about something, the more they become an expert on it.

.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06-29-2016, 5:22 PM
kemasa's Avatar
kemasa kemasa is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Ventura County, CA
Posts: 7,117
iTrader: 5 / 100%
Default

Even with a test, it does not mean that the number will work for you as everyone is different. At least it is something though, instead of pulling a number out of the air.
__________________
Kemasa.
FFL Transfer/Special Order Dealer since 1993.
Net-FFL list maintainer.

Never try to teach a pig to sing. You waste your time and you annoy the pig. - Robert A. Heinlein
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 06-30-2016, 7:01 AM
rb765's Avatar
rb765 rb765 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 407
iTrader: 15 / 100%
Default

I had a Northface Cat's Meow which was rated at 20 degrees until I loaned it to my sister in law who promptly lost it. It worked great in the high sierras even camping in the snow. If my knee ever gets fixed, I will be getting a new 20 degree bag with either the new super light synthetic materials, or a hydrophobic down bag. Just like guns, buy once, cry once. Get the best, lightest bag you can even if it hurts because a good bag will last many years if taken care of.
__________________
Want list:

Springfield Range Officer in 9mm, Walther PPK/S, Tika T3 Compact in .308, 20g over/under.

NRA Life Member Certified Instructor
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 06-30-2016, 7:09 AM
sd_shooter's Avatar
sd_shooter sd_shooter is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: San Diego
Posts: 6,927
iTrader: 72 / 100%
Default

Marmot never summer
https://www.rei.com/product/895824/m...FQgaaQod--8Atg
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 06-30-2016, 11:29 AM
robodeer's Avatar
robodeer robodeer is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 470
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Great tips, everyone. Thank you.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 07-01-2016, 8:40 AM
omgwtfbbq's Avatar
omgwtfbbq omgwtfbbq is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: North Sac Valley
Posts: 2,561
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Default

I was given a unissued surplus MSS (Modular Sleep System) a few years ago for volunteering at the local Veteran's Standown. They retail online for80-100 bucks.

What I like in particular about this setup is that there are three different layers of the system that can each be used independently of the other. There's a light "patrol bag" that is rated for +30F IIRC and a medium cold weather bag rated for -5F IIRC. They can be snapped and zipped into each other to make a -30F bag if you add the included Gortex Bivvy.

As a system it's plenty heavy though, about 10 lbs. However, if you only need one of the two bags, the weight goes down considerably.
__________________
CERTIFIED GLOCK ARMORER

WTS: PSE Archery Coyote Recurve Bow:
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/s....php?t=1219505

"Far and away the best prize life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." - Theodore Roosevelt

Quote:
Originally Posted by rmorris7556 View Post
They teach you secret stuff I can't mention on line.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 07-02-2016, 10:55 AM
ColdDeadHands1's Avatar
ColdDeadHands1 ColdDeadHands1 is online now
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains (Santa Clara County)
Posts: 2,957
iTrader: 67 / 100%
Default

I wanted a little more room than a mummy yet still light enough for backpacking. This Nemo 25deg is what I got. I've slept in 30deg so far and I needed to wear thermal top & bottom to feel comfortable. Around 40deg and up I just sleep in my boxers. I really like the feature of zippers on both sides as it allows me to fold it down like a comforter at home. I pared it up with this pad and it is a super comfortable set up. The bag and pad together are 5lb, 11oz. I found it much cheaper than MSRP at Moosejaw.com

http://www.nemoequipment.com/product/?p=Strato%20Loft

http://www.nemoequipment.com/product...nsulated%2025L


__________________


"Let me guess... This isn't about the alcohol or tobacco?"

Last edited by ColdDeadHands1; 07-02-2016 at 10:58 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 07-07-2016, 10:39 AM
stator's Avatar
stator stator is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 795
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Default

I have a Western Mountaineering sleeping bag with Gortex outer shell for over 15 years. It's great and the best bag you've likely never heard of.

You mentioned Sierras and Oregon, but that does not narrow down the climate ranges at all to give a good recommendation. High altitude Sierras get very cold in the summer, below freezing. However, Sierra foothills can be very warm during the night.

Coastal is different as well, if that is what you mean by Oregon.

To be honest, if you are a camping enthusiast, one bag is not going to cut it. You'll need two at minimum, likely three.
__________________
**
3 Rules of Skeet: Head on the gun, eye on the target, and proper lead
M1a - If you can see it, you can hit it
Friends don't let friends vote demorat
Utah CCW permit holder
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 1:21 AM.




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Proudly hosted by GeoVario the Premier 2A host.
Calguns.net, the 'Calguns' name and all associated variants and logos are ® Trademark and © Copyright 2002-2016, Calguns.net an Incorporated Company All Rights Reserved.