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  #1  
Old 07-30-2008, 6:24 PM
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DippyPower DippyPower is offline
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Default CERT Training in Santa Ana

Since the class is running, I will be providing reports here.

Below is the link for more info about the Santa Ana CERT program.
http://www.ci.santa-ana.ca.us/fire/CERT.asp

I was told that they do this with grant money they share with the Anaheim Fire Department, so that could provide opportunities in different parts of the County.

Last edited by DippyPower; 08-22-2008 at 12:37 PM.. Reason: clarity
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Old 08-08-2008, 9:30 PM
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I thought I would give anyone interested an account of what has been happening.

Day 1:
Basics about types of emergencies we face in Santa Ana/Orange County. This was also where they explained what we would be doing in the class, what CERT is and what you can become involved in if you so choose. They stressed the importance of being prepared because you and your neighbors WILL be on your own. They showed us what would be in a basic survival kit and gave use some handouts and a FEMA publication IS-22 titled Are You Ready? This seems like a good primer and you can share it with friends and neighbors without looking .

Day 2:
Was a short day dealing with fire. We got CERT binders that contain the course course information. during this class they also talked about shutting off your utilities. Next we talked about fire and what you can do. First when you go someplace always have a way out, preferably not the way you came in. This was reinforced by talking about the White Snake nightclub fire. Next we talked about what you can do at home with a fire. It ranges from you can put it out to run away to a predesignated safety spot. The class ended with us learning about the use and selection of fire extinguishers and getting the first of out CERT gear. We covered the basics in class and then went outside to put out flaming pools of diesel fuel.

You can get the FEMA publication here.http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/is22.asp

Last edited by DippyPower; 08-22-2008 at 12:36 PM..
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  #3  
Old 08-15-2008, 1:39 PM
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Day 3:
This was Medical Operations Part 1. The class started with the differnt phases of death. This was followed by stressing that during any operation you must take care of yourself first, because if you don't it will quickly be impossible for you to help others. Opening the airway was the first thing we practiced. this involved the Head-Tilt-Chin-Lift and Chin-Thrust methods. Once we opened the airway we had to find a way to keep it open. Next we learned about the different types of bleeding and how to control it. Recognizing and treating shock was our next task. Finally we learned about triage. This covered the different categories that will be used during a triage situation. Then we did some hypothetical exercises about triage cases.

Day 4:
This was Medical Operations Part 2. This class involved setting up triage and treatment. The first part was how and where to set up the triage locations. this was followed by doing head to toe assessments. Depending on your partner this could be a lot of fun. We also covered how to turn someone who may have a neck injury. We covered how to treat various injuries so that patients would be stabilized until they could be transported to professionals.
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Old 08-22-2008, 12:34 PM
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Day 5:
This was light search and rescue day. First we learned about different types of damage and whether we should enter a structure or not. This included examples from recent earthquakes and what you could do even if you can not enter a structure. After the lecture portion it was time for the class to put it into practice. My group started with the search and rescue in a building portion. This was done in the dark so we had to feel our way around until we found the victims and attach a rope nearby. We then had to follow our safety rope back to the door to get the next team so they could go in with the supplies needed for the rescue. The next portion of the practicum was learning how to lift and crib a heavy object so that we could rescue someone underneath.

Day 6:
Day 6 was disaster psychology. Here we learned about peoples responses to disaster, what we can expect from survivors, and what we can do. The class ended with us discussing what we can do to help ourselves in the face of calamity.
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Old 08-30-2008, 12:26 PM
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Day 7:
This class was about terrorism and what you as a CERT can do. Basically it is stuff that we all should practice everyday anyway. Be aware of what is going on around you and if you something that is not right move off to a safe distance and report it. As a CERT member there is not much that you are equipped to do when it comes to NBC incidents so your job will be to be a good witness and try to keep people from entering the area. This class also did not have a practicum.

Day 8:
This is the final formal class meeting. Here we use the skills that we learned during the previous 7 nights. As a team we had to solve the tasks of putting out fires, conducting search and rescue, and performing medical operations. It was a useful experience and it would be nice to be able to do it a couple of times per year. After the exercise we discussed what we did right and what we could better. The class ended with us learning we may be the last CERT class out of the Santa Ana program. This is because the cordinator moved over to the Riverside DA's office. If this class is something that you may want to do in the future, even if you do not live in Santa Ana, contact Chief Mark Martin at:
Santa Ana Fire Department Headquarters
1439 South Broadway Street
Santa Ana, CA 92707
or call the SAFD at 714-647-5700

Coming up:
There is a graduation ceremony next week where we are supposed to get the last of our gear. After I have it all I will post some pics.
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  #6  
Old 08-30-2008, 3:12 PM
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Thanks for the review. I start CERT Weds. night.
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  #7  
Old 09-09-2008, 2:17 PM
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As my final entry I will say that CERT training is useful for everyone. If you are just starting in the basics of emergency survival it is a good start. For people with more experience it provides a good opportunity to practice and meet other people and get new ideas. CERT will not teach you how to deal with the sudden end of the world as you know it.

As promised here are pictures of the CERT gear I received. Your experience may be different.

First up is CERT the outfit. It consists of a hard hat, goggles, leather gloves, and a vest. The headlight is mine.


Next is CERT the backpack. It is not a good go bag for the boonies, but it will hold your CERT gear.


Third is CERT the tools. The flashlight and multitool are cheap, but they are better than nothing and may prove useful for gifts during an emergency.


Forth is CERT the food and bandages. The food bars are not to bad and taste like a vitamin enriched lemon cookie.


Fifth is stuff to keep you dry and or warm.


Finally we have CERT the flamethrower er... I mean the books they give you in the pack. I have included links to the companies product descriptions.
http://www.riteintherain.com/ItemFor...e-7f99789a7dfe
http://www.readybooks.us/Merchant2/m...roduct_Count=0
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  #8  
Old 09-10-2008, 1:20 PM
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Thanks for the posts. Sounds informative.
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  #9  
Old 09-10-2008, 4:28 PM
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Thanks for the informative review. I started the OCSD's CEPA (Citizen Emergency Preparedness Academy) last night in Rancho Santa Margarita. From what the instructor told me, it's much like CERT except that you don't become "deputized" into a responder team afterward. I don't think he's correct, but we'll see. I may choose to go through CERT training after this is done.

You mentioned that on Day 1 they discussed possible next steps, or what a CERT responder can become involved with if they so choose. Can you shed some more light on that please? Thanks again for the good write-up.
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Old 09-10-2008, 9:35 PM
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As it was explained to us you may be called on to provide man power for certain catastrophic events. For example, we had a person in my class who worked as a CERT volunteer during the Santiago Fire doing logistics and checkpoint work. Other things maybe assisting in an urban search and rescue, flood prevention, or other catastrophes in a similar fashion. At the basic level a CERT member is expected to be the first responder for their neighborhood, so that they can start to provide assistance and lay the groundwork for when professional help finally arrives. Plus as CERT member you may use your training in other ways, such as a bus accident, where you can help people before first responders arrive.

If you volunteer for more you will be used to free up better trained personnel, so they can fight the fire for example, while you handle the paperwork and logistics. You may be called on to participate in events in other cities and or states. All of this is voluntary because they know that people have jobs and families that they may not be able to leave.

The basic CERT training is also supposed to be just an opener. According to the coordinator, before she left, there are supposed to be classes at the county and state level that are more advanced.

Last edited by DippyPower; 09-11-2008 at 10:55 AM..
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