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Blades, Bows and Tools Discussion of non-firearm weapons and camping/survival tools.

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  #1  
Old 08-26-2018, 4:08 PM
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ShredLA ShredLA is offline
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Default Whetstones?

Iím currently looking to buy a few whetstones to sharpen my kitchen and edc knives, anyone have some suggestions?
I have some cheap kitchen blades to practice with before moving onto the expensive stuff.

Any information on whetstones and general sharpening would be great.

Local retailer here has some King stones in various grits, would love to hear pros/cons and brands
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  #2  
Old 08-27-2018, 2:47 PM
Coolguy101 Coolguy101 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShredLA View Post
Iím currently looking to buy a few whetstones to sharpen my kitchen and edc knives, anyone have some suggestions?
I have some cheap kitchen blades to practice with before moving onto the expensive stuff.

Any information on whetstones and general sharpening would be great.

Local retailer here has some King stones in various grits, would love to hear pros/cons and brands
I don't use whetstones, at least not since Boyscouts! I use ceramic crock sticks instead. It takes the guess work out of the angles, and last a long time. I can put a consistent sharp edge on my knives faster and more accurately than I can with a whetstone.
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  #3  
Old 08-27-2018, 10:34 PM
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Mojaveman Mojaveman is offline
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There was a pretty informative thread titled "Sharpening" started a few months ago.
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  #4  
Old 08-28-2018, 3:25 PM
Coolguy101 Coolguy101 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Mist Maker View Post
^^^
I use a similar set up.
The Spyderco Sharpmaker kit will sharpen every thing you can think of and do a very nice job of it as well.
The Cutco knife rep's also use the same set for in home warranty sharpening.
I have put a razor edge on my 6" ESEE carbon blade knife and it sharpens easily and quickly holding the correct angles.
Side Note*
The Spyderco set allows for 2 angles to choose from depending on knife and or preference.
The spyderco one with the triangular sticks are the BEST. It can do serrated edges as well as regular edges. And yes, it does have 15 and 22 degree angles available.

With those, I have zero use for a regular whetstone again. Not that there is anything wrong with using one, but its just outdated.
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Old 08-28-2018, 4:25 PM
Khromo Khromo is offline
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If you have a few bucks, and you want to see what a lot of folks call the state of the art:

https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/S...s-P742C84.aspx

You can start with a 500 and a 1,000, add a 4,000 and you are in great shape. No one needs them all, and you might find better prices elsewhere. Most folks don't hit even 4,000, few go beyond 8,000. Figure $200-320 to go up to 4,000 or 8,000.


If you prefer the romance and slower cut of natural stones, and you're not sharpening the newer supersteels, there are a couple of options, high and low:

Amakusa red from eBay. More coarse and faster cutting than a soft Arkansas, and the stones are about 8.5" x 2.3" x2.3". Needs lapping for sure! From Japan, about $90.
Pro-Cut Hard Arkansas from Amazon, get at least 8 x 2, the giant 12 x 3 x 0.75" is only about $80.
Belgian Blue from Amazon, about $80 for the big one.
You can finish with the Belgian Blue (or the hard Ark, for that matter!), but the Tsushimi Black Nagura is the finest natural stone I have ever seen, it is remarkable. It comes from a closed undersea quarry off the coast of Japan. It costs about $100 but it is good sized, will last a few generations under normal use, and it is the finest stone I have ever used.

That's about $350, for the coolest natural stones. A less costly option:


Pro-Cut Soft and Hard Arks from Amazon, about $160 for the jumbo 12 x 3 x 3/4"'s, a lot less for 8 x 2's.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


A Chinese finishing stone. Less than $40 for a very respectable natural stone, 8 x 2 1/2" or so, sometimes shipped from the interior of China in a week or three, sometimes shipped from the U.S. A lot better than any of the "hard black Arkansas" or "black Arkansas" stones I'm seeing lately. I think the Novaculite is getting mined out.

This one is $26! It is very fine. This sounds ridiculous, but I've bought a few, and I actually bought a few extras to give as gifts. That's getting away cheap for a cool gift! I had one out of four with a divot on one side, which is polishing smooth under heavy use. The other side is great.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


If you want really good waterstones, you can buy any of a million different blends from Japan, China, the U.S., or you can buy the kit from Norton. They are very excellent cutters, they have the grits you want, and they include a good leveling stone. About $140-160, if you shop or hit a sale.

https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/N...Kit-P94C4.aspx
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Last edited by Khromo; 11-10-2018 at 6:53 PM..
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  #6  
Old 08-28-2018, 8:53 PM
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Thank you guys! Those glass stones look interesting.
Specifically i’d like to work with some of my cheap chef blades so that I can start hand sharpening my inexpensive (but fun)Gerber flat iron (7cr17mov) or my pricier elmax steel blades.
I also plan on starting a Japanese kitchen knife collection. Hope that can help narrow down some ideas
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  #7  
Old 08-29-2018, 5:03 AM
Khromo Khromo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShredLA View Post
...I also plan on starting a Japanese kitchen knife collection. Hope that can help narrow down some ideas
You don't want to make a relatively simple choice more complicated than necessary.

If your collection will include modern steels, you are probably going to need synthetics: ceramic or diamonds.

If your collection will focus on traditional steel knives, your collection would "look" best with a set of natural stones from Japan. You could use synthetics for speed and wider grit selection, but you don't need them.
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Remember, the overwhelming majority of anti-gun thinkers are not stupid enough to be "afraid of guns." They are afraid of stupid/immature/crazy psycho people with guns.
And as always, being friendly, courteous, and respectful is the easiest way to bend people to your will.
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Old 09-15-2018, 8:28 PM
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I keep my kitchen and pocket knives sharp with an occasional touch-up using a Blue Super Fine Eze-lap diamond hone ($8-$10). It's technique more than tool - I find it easier to angle the stone/hone on the knife rather than angle the knife on a stone:
I lay the knife's back on the edge of the kitchen counter and rub the hone in a circular motion up and down the length of cutting edge at a shallow angle, striving to keep the same angle throughout and not round over the edge by changing (increasing) the angle. I use tap water as a lube. Not Sushi Chef fish-filleting sharp, but good enough for general kitchen use; sharp enough to slice a tomato nicely.

Last edited by rmnc3r; 09-15-2018 at 8:33 PM..
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  #9  
Old 09-15-2018, 8:47 PM
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Belgian Coticule keeps my straight razors sharp
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Old 09-15-2018, 8:54 PM
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I just bought two from amazon, Iíll report soon
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  #11  
Old 09-15-2018, 10:29 PM
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Here's a channel for you to peruse: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOl...6CrS0kcybhaThg
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  #12  
Old 09-15-2018, 11:40 PM
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True is that i have sharpened my knives like i hone my chisels and irons (i can shave w em). But, seems that 320 is the sweet spot for knives, that micro serrated edge is what I like in all my pocket knives, kitchen knives and fish filet knives.
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Old 09-16-2018, 1:35 PM
Zimbo Zimbo is offline
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If using stones is new to you , as the others have said it's more about technique than the stones.
The whetstones can really starting getting pricey. I was in the same position as you and ended up getting the Norton India combo stone for $20 to try and get my technique right before progressing to the fancier whetstones. I can get my knives (not super steels) shaving sharp but not as quickly or as easy I have seen the folks on Youtube manage. Once I get there I will look at a whetstone or two. Good luck with your decision.
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  #14  
Old 09-17-2018, 1:18 AM
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ShredLA,

Nice Avatar btw

For low grit rough work I use an inexpensive combination stone that can be found at most hardware stores, you can also use automotive wet-sand paper on a very flat surface like a stone, metal, or ceramic tile.

For fine, which is usually the zen fun bulk of the sharpening, I use a King KW65 1000/600 .

Then I have two strops for finishing. Both are mounted to 1" thick pieces of wood, one loaded with extra fine buffing compound the other without. Like everything else you can buy the strop material on Amazon or use a leather belt or guitar strap.

To flatten/square the King whetstone I use a cheap Chinese synthetic whetstone that I mistakenly purchased before I did much research. I also sometimes use it for rougher initial edge work.

My opinion on the King whetstone:
I discovered the King stones after watching several professional Japanese knife sharpeners on Youtube. It's often the one that's suggested to people wanting to get started in wet sharpening on a tighter budget. It's a pleasure to use and I'm extremely happy with it. It wasn't until I got the King whetstone that I was able to confidently put a hair shaving edge on every blade I sharpened. It's good that you have access to them locally. I ordered mine on Amazon and got lucky that it had no cracks or chips like some of the reviewers. The cheaper Chinese stone was also ordered from Amazon, it was horribly mislabeled by the manufacturer, it's grit is nowhere close to being as fine as it advertises.

In the end my current sharpening set-up (everything I've listed) only cost around 70 bucks total.

My system and technique is a lot like Kyle Noseworthy-weiderfan on Youtube, but obviously I'm not as good. Instead of a king he uses a Woodstock SteeleX D1130 1000/6000 Grit Japanese Waterstone.

Kyle Noseworthy-weiderfan: https://youtu.be/1dYY2JhkBgo

Last edited by loosewreck; 09-17-2018 at 3:44 PM.. Reason: fixed link
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