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Hunting and Fishing Rifle, Shotgun, Handgun, Archery, Blackpowder Saltwater and Fresh Water

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  #41  
Old 07-06-2018, 3:36 PM
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BigFatGuy BigFatGuy is offline
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Paso Robles "Oysters". Shown here with Sweet Chili and Cocktail sauces.


  • remove the testicle from the scrotum (it's freaking tough to slice open!)
  • simmer (don't boil) in court boullion (water, wine, onion, garlic, salt, pepper, etc) til cooked and tender. I went about 90 minutes because the youtube video I saw told me to, but 45 likely would have been enough
  • slice into bite-size bits
  • cool for a few minutes in the fridge
  • flour, egg, flour, egg, panko
  • serve with some kind of dipping sauce, and alcohol

the taste is very different than steer nutz, more like liver. All in all, it wasn't bad.
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  #42  
Old 07-06-2018, 3:41 PM
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BigFatGuy BigFatGuy is offline
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I've tried several ways to cook Boar Backstrap.

success REQUIRES a good meat thermometer, and VERY careful thermal control. I've also found that, if your butcher cuts the backstrap in "roast" form, as mine did, you have to seperate the more rounded part from the flatter part (the cross section is kind of like a letter P or q), because they are different thickness.

Trich is dead by 145F, and the pork is dry and tough at 145.5F.

A sauce is a must, and brining helps (soak overnight in a cup of salt, a cup of sugar, a few cups of water, maybe a cup of bourbon), but thermal control is mandatory.
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  #43  
Old 07-06-2018, 5:29 PM
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Really enjoying your posts. If you aren’t already, you should watch Steve Rinella’s show on Netflix “MeatEater” and also check out Hank Shaw’s blog and cookbooks. Hank’ recipes are more refined and similar to the stuff I like to do (having worked professionally in kitchens) but i love Rinella’s enthusiasm and storytelling.

Also, get yourself a sous vide device (I like the Anova unit for its price/performance). It will open up a whole new world of ideas when it comes to precise temp control. Also recommend the Lavatools Javelin Pro duo thermometer. These are all super important parts of my kit for cooking.


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  #44  
Old 07-06-2018, 8:41 PM
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I think, if it wasn't for Steve Rinella, my wife would never have been OK with going hunting. Big fan of his show and his podcast.

Hank Shaw, I'll give a second chance.

I've really been resisting the need to go sousvide. I have enough gadgets and crap around my kitchen already... but it's a better technology, I get that.

I have to say, wild boar is about the hardest thing I've EVER tried to cook. I've never met an animal that didn't taste good medium rare with a charred exterior, salt, and pepper... but this is SO DAMN sensitive and dry...

I'm really seeing why people turn entire boars into ground meat. The ground lets you mix pig fat in, and makes it moist and delicious, and bullet-proof like domestic pork.

(semi-related note: I went back to college in my mid 30's, and went for Electrical Engineering. I've always enjoyed cooking, and virtually flipped a coin to decide between E.E. and culinary school. In the end, I decided I'd rather not be at work every night, weekend, and holiday for the rest of my career, while being shouted at in French... but I still kind of wonder what would have happened...)
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  #45  
Old 07-09-2018, 2:50 PM
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made a truly delicious Backstrap dish last night.

On further investigation, there is a bit of what I can only describe as "silver skin" running through the backstrap. It's not as rubbery as the stuff found on the back of a rib rack, but it seems to be an excellent thermal insulator. slowly poking into the meat with a thermometer, I've found thermal curves like this: 150F, 148F, 145F, 140F, 94F. The meat will be white/grey on the exterior side of this silver skin, and red/bloody on the inside.

Butterflying the roast into about a half-inch-thick and cooking over a VERY HOT direct grill flame really seemed to help. The meat was still more done than I'd prefer (all white/well done), but it was still moist and tender!

So, until I find something else, my go-to for boar backstrap is:
1: brine
2: butterfly
3: flamethrower both sides
4: sauce

On a related note, my supermarket sells a BBQ sauce made by Stone Brewing, based on their Tangerine IPA beer (which is fantastic). It's a nicely acidic, fruity sauce, and is DELICIOUS on pork.
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  #46  
Old 07-09-2018, 3:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigFatGuy View Post
made a truly delicious Backstrap dish last night.

On further investigation, there is a bit of what I can only describe as "silver skin" running through the backstrap. It's not as rubbery as the stuff found on the back of a rib rack, but it seems to be an excellent thermal insulator. slowly poking into the meat with a thermometer, I've found thermal curves like this: 150F, 148F, 145F, 140F, 94F. The meat will be white/grey on the exterior side of this silver skin, and red/bloody on the inside.
That same "silver skin" is actually fascia, and it encases all large muscle groups, but its particularly bad on all tenderloins (beef, pork, rabbit, etc). Normally butchers remove this, so when you buy a "tenderloin" from the store you never see it.

It ALWAYS needs to be removed. The problem is that it shrinks up and dries out and is really tough unless cooked "low and slow" (which you don't want to do with a tenderloin). Its basically made from similar material to a tendon, and has the same fibrous "strings".

A sharp, thin bladed knife is the best way to remove them, and I like to just start a cut and then lay the tenderloin against a cutting board and push the knife flat to the cutting board along the length of the loin.

This is the way I do it, but I start at one end instead of cutting the center:
https://youtu.be/ipLeFo1-UEM?t=1m9s

And get EVERY spec of it. Nothing worse than having a bite of juicy, delicious tender meat and finding a little chewy bit in there!
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  #47  
Old 07-09-2018, 9:05 PM
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In the tenderloin, I didn't find the silver skin so offensive... but I have sliced it pretty thin both times I've made that.

The loin, the subject of my latest "research", however, has big honking bits of gristle that really do need to be removed before serving.
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  #48  
Old 09-05-2018, 1:27 PM
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By comparison, I've tried domestic pig heart and domestic beef heart purchased from a philipino market kind-of-near my house.

The pig heart tasted ok, but was nowhere near as good as the wild boar heart.

The beef heart.. stank. It didn't smell rotten, it just smelled bad. based on advice I've received here (maybe this thread), I marinated it in oyster sauce, soy sauce, sugar, Xiao Xing wine, and onions. Cooked it in a 12" wok sitting on a 60kBTU turkey frying propane burner. (the wok glows at night). I basically made "mongolian beef heart". It was good.
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  #49  
Old 09-05-2018, 2:12 PM
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I use a smoker to cook most meat, including wild pig. It turns out tender, juicy, and full of flavor.
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  #50  
Old 09-05-2018, 2:51 PM
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I just sausage my wild boar. I love breakfast sausage it and if I want tender pork loins I’ll just buy domestic for 4$. Glad to see someone pulled it off. I’m a bit of a perfectionist when it comes to cooking and I hate to waste game meat. I’ll have to try some with my sous vide. That thing is magic. I also have the Anova.
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  #51  
Old 09-05-2018, 3:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by estrom View Post
I use a smoker to cook most meat, including wild pig. It turns out tender, juicy, and full of flavor.
Smoking is one thing that has NOT gone well for me with wild pig. It takes a lot of sauce to moisten it up.

Not only have I done it, but I know someone who was a professional BBQ/smoker guy... even HE couldn't make it turn out well. :-(
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  #52  
Old 09-05-2018, 3:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deckhandmike View Post
I just sausage my wild boar. I love breakfast sausage it and if I want tender pork loins I’ll just buy domestic for 4$. Glad to see someone pulled it off. I’m a bit of a perfectionist when it comes to cooking and I hate to waste game meat. I’ll have to try some with my sous vide. That thing is magic. I also have the Anova.
Wild pig tenderloins in the sous vide are excellent! I marinate mine for two days, cook them to 137 degrees in the sous vide for 3 hours, then quick finish them on the grill or cast iron skillet. They come out moist and tender.
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  #53  
Old 09-05-2018, 3:56 PM
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Serve with fava beans and a nice Chianti.
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  #54  
Old 09-05-2018, 5:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishfisher View Post
Wild pig tenderloins in the sous vide are excellent! I marinate mine for two days, cook them to 137 degrees in the sous vide for 3 hours, then quick finish them on the grill or cast iron skillet. They come out moist and tender.
Good to know. I’m going to start cooking most of my game in the sous vide due to precision.
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