Calguns.net  

Home My iTrader Join the NRA Donate to CGSSA Sponsors CGN Google Search
CA Semiauto Ban(AW)ID Flowchart CA Handgun Ban ID Flowchart CA Shotgun Ban ID Flowchart
Go Back   Calguns.net > INTERESTS AND ACTIVITIES > Ammo and Reloading
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Ammo and Reloading Factory Ammunition, Reloading, Components, Load Data and more.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 02-12-2018, 2:12 PM
LynnJr LynnJr is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 5,715
iTrader: 7 / 100%
Default

CalPik
The reason some brass fits and the rest doesn't is a product of how many times the brass is fired and how hot the load was.
If all the brass was fired the exact same number of times and all the loads where the same it would size the same.
If you start one piece of brass at 40 grains and one at 43 grains the piece of brass with the heavier powder charge would expand more. It would also get sized more by the die because it had expanded more.
You can test this by not sizing brand new brass at all. Take a pair of pliers and oblong the neck so it will hold a bullet and fire it in your gun.
Now take that empty case and deprime it by hand and oblong the neck with the pliers and keep shooting it until it no longer fits. You should be able to get 3 firings from a moderate load before any sizing needs to be done at all.

How does this relate to your situation you ask.
When you squeeze the body of your brass in a die the brass has to go somewhere so it pushes the shoulder forward. This is giving you the variation you are seeing and causing the problem
If you didn't size the brass at all it would most likely still fit.

Now for the fix!!!
Take a piece of the brass that is very hard to fit in the gun. Put some Imperial Sizing Die Wax on it and run it through the die. Now crank the die down in small increments until the gun closes without effort.
If you get the die all the way down to the point it can't be adjusted any further and the brass still won't chamber then you start sanding on the shellholder.
The shellholder fix is only for minor adjustments. If you need to take a lot of material off you can take it off the bottom of the die itself.
You always start with the shellholder because they are the cheapest part of the puzzle. The problem with that is that it doesn't take much material removal before the shellholder rim will tear off on the downward stroke of the reloading presses ram.
__________________
Lynn Dragoman, Jr.
Southwest Regional Director
Unlimited Range Shooters Association (URSA)
www.unlimitedrange.org
Not a commercial business.
URSA - Competition starts at 2000 yards!
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 02-12-2018, 4:37 PM
NiMiK NiMiK is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 465
iTrader: 27 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by calpik View Post
yes, that's what I do.
I have hornady comparator, calipers (electronic) and several "blanks" with special bullet seating depth.

My question was about the seating process itself. Every time I push a bullet (lee hand press and lee dead bullet seating die) I see different seating depth. I do rotate cartridges while i'm pushing bullet (they do not sit straight, I pull back a little bit, rotate cartridge and push it back and they look better).

Q1: how to seat bullets properly? OR What's the reason of different seating depth (it can differ up to 3-4 thousands of inch)
Q2: I feel different resistance while seating a bullet. What's the reason of that? - I measured case necks after sizing (lee collect sizer) , they all are around the same value, may be 1\2 of thousands of inch difference. And bullets which are seated easily usually sit deeper...
It could be the shell holder, die, brass needs annealing, compressed loads.. Too many variables that needs to be deducted one at a time. I've seen some BR shooters seat 1/3 of the bullet then rotate 1/4 and repeat. Compressed or crunchy loads are held for about 2 seconds when fully seated but they settle the powder in the case with a small vibrating tool or tooth brush before seating. Are the brass the same head stamp?
I would definitely try Lynn's idea with the shell holder first. Maybe sort the brass and anneal if that doesnt work.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 02-12-2018, 5:49 PM
LynnJr LynnJr is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 5,715
iTrader: 7 / 100%
Default

Seating depth should be left as long as possible and not varied until your powder charge has been found.
As long as possible means maximum magazine length if one is used or the full jam length if shot as a single shot.
Seating depth is the second biggest part of accuracy.
The variation you see is caused by a few things.
Uneven meplat and a plug type seating stem. Unsorted bullets in a sleeve type seating stem.
On custom dies alot of the most serious competitors will lap the seating stem for a particular bullet or they will epoxy bed it.
__________________
Lynn Dragoman, Jr.
Southwest Regional Director
Unlimited Range Shooters Association (URSA)
www.unlimitedrange.org
Not a commercial business.
URSA - Competition starts at 2000 yards!
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 02-12-2018, 6:27 PM
eric n eric n is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Inland empire
Posts: 211
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by calpik View Post
as I said, there is no stringing. Bullets group OK (for me at least), but with different powder charge group moves horizontally, not vertically. And was looking for a reason for that and how to fix that.

2 pictures with marking. (100yards and 300 yards)
you can clearly see shooter errors and at the same moment POI moves horizontally.

difference between loads 0.2gr
Is this repeatable on different days or is this a sample of one day?
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 02-12-2018, 8:07 PM
calpik calpik is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 27
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by eric n View Post
Is this repeatable on different days or is this a sample of one day?
2 different days, 2 different ranges.

one day was super calm, another had a little bit of wind, but was not bad/gusty

same load, same bullet, same powder, same primer, same set of brass cases. brass was trimmed to the same length, same bullet seating depth (1-2 thousands of an inch range though)

gun was not cleaned with brush between shooting, only boresnake couple of times - just to keep moisture away.

gun was not overheated (I could touch the chamber area of the barrel without burning my hands)
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 02-12-2018, 8:28 PM
calpik calpik is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 27
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnJr View Post
CalPik
The reason some brass fits and the rest doesn't is a product of how many times the brass is fired and how hot the load was.
If all the brass was fired the exact same number of times and all the loads where the same it would size the same.
If you start one piece of brass at 40 grains and one at 43 grains the piece of brass with the heavier powder charge would expand more. It would also get sized more by the die because it had expanded more.

How does this relate to your situation you ask.
When you squeeze the body of your brass in a die the brass has to go somewhere so it pushes the shoulder forward. This is giving you the variation you are seeing and causing the problem
If you didn't size the brass at all it would most likely still fit.

aha! so... yes, you're actually right. I had a situation when I kept cases in order and some of them experienced heavier charge everytime I loaded them. And yes, I saw different external dimension of cases after shooting.

But I thought that if I use full size die - they all will be the same after sizing operation? Like they are after 1-2 firings... they all size to the same dimensions..



Quote:
Now for the fix!!!
Take a piece of the brass that is very hard to fit in the gun. Put some Imperial Sizing Die Wax on it and run it through the die. Now crank the die down in small increments until the gun closes without effort.
If you get the die all the way down to the point it can't be adjusted any further and the brass still won't chamber then you start sanding on the shellholder.
The shellholder fix is only for minor adjustments. If you need to take a lot of material off you can take it off the bottom of the die itself.
You always start with the shellholder because they are the cheapest part of the puzzle. The problem with that is that it doesn't take much material removal before the shellholder rim will tear off on the downward stroke of the reloading presses ram.
Yes, I did exactly what you say: started slowly lowering sizing die, until I have easy locking bolt.



so, the result:
different loads made the brass different and now it even does not size properly.

to prevent that:
1. rotate cases somehow to prevent situation when some of them are worked harder than the other.
2. size them as often as possible? (I ordered redding bushing die - want to bump shoulders after each firing without overworking the neck)


Will annealing help somehow here?
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 02-12-2018, 8:38 PM
calpik calpik is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 27
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NiMiK View Post
It could be the shell holder, die, brass needs annealing, compressed loads.. Too many variables that needs to be deducted one at a time. I've seen some BR shooters seat 1/3 of the bullet then rotate 1/4 and repeat. Compressed or crunchy loads are held for about 2 seconds when fully seated but they settle the powder in the case with a small vibrating tool or tooth brush before seating. Are the brass the same head stamp?
I would definitely try Lynn's idea with the shell holder first. Maybe sort the brass and anneal if that doesnt work.
no compress loads (h322 powder), same headstamp. I'm not sure if it makes any sense to sort it now after many firings (like 5-10, did not count well)? But at some moment I checked some of them, they all were in 1% range by weight. I even tried to group them and tested with the same powder charge - did not see any difference at 100 yards (probably shooter) on a paper so left that to BR shooters.

Neck sizing with lee collet die.
I see different neck diameters after sizing: .246 - most of them, but some of them are .2455 and some are .2465
Is seating force relates to that?


Is it because of the same issue - different loads worked brass in a different way?
Will annealing help?
or is it a nature of the die itself and I can do nothing with that, only switch to bushing dies ?
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 02-12-2018, 8:46 PM
calpik calpik is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 27
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnJr View Post
Seating depth should be left as long as possible and not varied until your powder charge has been found.
As long as possible means maximum magazine length if one is used or the full jam length if shot as a single shot.
Seating depth is the second biggest part of accuracy.
The variation you see is caused by a few things.
Uneven meplat and a plug type seating stem. Unsorted bullets in a sleeve type seating stem.
On custom dies alot of the most serious competitors will lap the seating stem for a particular bullet or they will epoxy bed it.
I measure seating depth using hornady comparator... Should I measure OAL as well?
Is lee dead bullet seating die able to produce cartridges with the same length (+-1 thousand of an inch, not 5)

i'll check die/press... may be will switch to something else, just did not want to spend tons of money , because it's a factory rifle and the desired accuracy is not 0.25MOA. I just want it to be the same, to be consistent. Not like when 3-4 group well and 1-2 fly away "just because" - I want predictable ammo, not superaccurate. If I can make it and tune it down to 1MOA - i'm ok with that, if it's 0.5-0.6MOA - i'm ok with that as well!
Just do not want flyers... They make training process very hard...
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 02-13-2018, 4:29 AM
eric n eric n is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Inland empire
Posts: 211
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Default

What are you using for a rest?
Based on your pics and load development at different times ruling out wind, I'd hazard a guess and say it's your fundamentals. Your 300 yd groups look like your rear bag is settling, you changed cheek pressure and wind.
Are you taking a break between the groups? Something changed. Re-shoot them focusing on fundamentals and not the target. I'd bet your groups change.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 02-13-2018, 6:00 AM
the86d's Avatar
the86d the86d is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Pinko-occupied Commiefornia
Posts: 6,699
iTrader: 3 / 100%
Default

Does barrel thickness come into play (H-Bar/Bull-barrel vs. pencil-thin or fluted)?
__________________
"That's what governments are for - get in a man's way." - Captain Malcolm 'Mal' Reynolds
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 02-13-2018, 7:13 AM
tonyjr tonyjr is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,222
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Just wondering how you clean your brass .
Depending on what is in use [ we may be loading /
working on as many as 3 calibers at the same time ]
The cases are either vibrated with nut or corn [ I have
not found buckwheat locally ] or tumbled with pins .
This is to clean the inside of cases , the flash hole and
primer pocket , then run thru the RCBS station .
The burnt / unburnt " stuff " in / on inside case changes
the volume .
__________________
life member - CRPA and NRA
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 02-13-2018, 7:47 AM
LynnJr LynnJr is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 5,715
iTrader: 7 / 100%
Default

so, the result:
different loads made the brass different and now it even does not size properly.

to prevent that:
1. rotate cases somehow to prevent situation when some of them are worked harder than the other.
2. size them as often as possible? (I ordered redding bushing die - want to bump shoulders after each firing without overworking the neck)


Will annealing help somehow here?

Bypass the annealing for now you can always do it down the road.
I use the 50 or 100 round mtm plastic boxes and load when I can do 200-400 rounds as a batch. I cycle through my brass if that helps.

In your example the brass most likely didn't need full length sizing so when you set up the die it was set-up at a less than optimal setting.
You want the die set-up for your tightest piece of brass. If you set it up for a piece of brass that barely fits your chamber now that piece of brass may not fit after full length sizing!!!!!!!!!!
Yes that is not a typo brass that fits your gun now can be run into a full length die and it will no longer fit.
Your die needs to be set-up for the worst piece of brass.
__________________
Lynn Dragoman, Jr.
Southwest Regional Director
Unlimited Range Shooters Association (URSA)
www.unlimitedrange.org
Not a commercial business.
URSA - Competition starts at 2000 yards!
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 02-13-2018, 3:23 PM
calpik calpik is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 27
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyjr View Post
Just wondering how you clean your brass .
Depending on what is in use [ we may be loading /
working on as many as 3 calibers at the same time ]
The cases are either vibrated with nut or corn [ I have
not found buckwheat locally ] or tumbled with pins .
This is to clean the inside of cases , the flash hole and
primer pocket , then run thru the RCBS station .
The burnt / unburnt " stuff " in / on inside case changes
the volume .
this is strange... all books i have tell me that "cleaning" case has nothing to do with accuracy.
all i do : some steel wool to clean up necks from outside. Sometimes i clean primer pocket with small thing from lee kit
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 02-13-2018, 3:24 PM
calpik calpik is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 27
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnJr View Post
so, the result:
different loads made the brass different and now it even does not size properly.

to prevent that:
1. rotate cases somehow to prevent situation when some of them are worked harder than the other.
2. size them as often as possible? (I ordered redding bushing die - want to bump shoulders after each firing without overworking the neck)


Will annealing help somehow here?

Bypass the annealing for now you can always do it down the road.
I use the 50 or 100 round mtm plastic boxes and load when I can do 200-400 rounds as a batch. I cycle through my brass if that helps.

In your example the brass most likely didn't need full length sizing so when you set up the die it was set-up at a less than optimal setting.
You want the die set-up for your tightest piece of brass. If you set it up for a piece of brass that barely fits your chamber now that piece of brass may not fit after full length sizing!!!!!!!!!!
Yes that is not a typo brass that fits your gun now can be run into a full length die and it will no longer fit.
Your die needs to be set-up for the worst piece of brass.
I checked that. All brass was bigger than xxx, i tried the method you mentioned above (with closing bolt) and all brass sized - that's for sure
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 02-13-2018, 6:20 PM
nedro nedro is offline
CGN/CGSSA Contributor
CGN Contributor
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 3,321
iTrader: 8 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by calpik View Post
this is strange... all books i have tell me that "cleaning" case has nothing to do with accuracy.
all i do : some steel wool to clean up necks from outside. Sometimes i clean primer pocket with small thing from lee kit
How do you know that the inside of the case is clean and free of crud that will change the volume of the case?
__________________
Here in California; Law abiding Citizens are simply Useful Idiots and Criminals are a Protected Species.
<nedro>
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 02-13-2018, 6:31 PM
calpik calpik is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 27
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nedro View Post
How do you know that the inside of the case is clean and free of crud that will change the volume of the case?
because 50000+ psi ? such pressure is enough to make water to cut metal...

Actually I checked that. weigh 1 case, cleaned it with brush, checked internals with lamp and weigh it again...
scale did not catch any weight change (0.1gr).
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 02-13-2018, 6:51 PM
tonyjr tonyjr is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,222
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

calpik
I know , but like I used to tell people before I retired -
I did not write the book .
It you think a dirty primer pocket , flash hole , burnt
powder inside case or a combination of any don't affect
pressure , you are right up there with the press makers .
They think reloaders [ a lot do ] just decap and reload .
The rest of us waste our time and money by buying things
to clean the cases [ vibrators , tumblers , sonics , prep
stations , media , primer pocket reamers / cleaners ]
To me a dirty case is like using a 2 die set .
__________________
life member - CRPA and NRA
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 02-14-2018, 5:13 AM
LynnJr LynnJr is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 5,715
iTrader: 7 / 100%
Default

Your groups don't look all that bad except for the horizontal stringing. The load is a vertical stringing issue which you don't seem to have.
Plenty of Benchrest shooters only clean the outside of there brass and using two dies so don't worry about that for now.
Tell us about your gun and rest set-up.
__________________
Lynn Dragoman, Jr.
Southwest Regional Director
Unlimited Range Shooters Association (URSA)
www.unlimitedrange.org
Not a commercial business.
URSA - Competition starts at 2000 yards!
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 02-14-2018, 6:17 AM
N21911S N21911S is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Antelope, CA....near Sacramento
Posts: 244
iTrader: 7 / 100%
Default

First thing to check for is consistent cheek pressure. Whatever amount you use must be the same for every shot.
__________________
"Afflicted with a lifelong addiction to the rifled bore".
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 02-14-2018, 8:45 PM
calpik calpik is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 27
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnJr View Post
Your groups don't look all that bad except for the horizontal stringing. The load is a vertical stringing issue which you don't seem to have.
Plenty of Benchrest shooters only clean the outside of there brass and using two dies so don't worry about that for now.
Tell us about your gun and rest set-up.
Weatherby vanguard standard barrel (very old model, with 1-12 twist. so I shoot 52/53gr bullet with h322) with boyds varmint stock (not bedded)
scope fixed 10x
The rest... Whatever I can find on a range: sandbags and plastic things. normally without rear support, but when I do "load test" I use sandbag or a jacket as a rear support.
Reply With Quote
  #61  
Old 02-14-2018, 8:52 PM
calpik calpik is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 27
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by N21911S View Post
First thing to check for is consistent cheek pressure. Whatever amount you use must be the same for every shot.
There is nothing to check. I have an issue and I know that - stock is too low and a little bit too long for me.

I want to remove buttpad and tape something on top of stock. The only problem with cheekrest is that it's going to interfere with cleaning rod. Not a big issue as I rarely clean the rifle, but anyway removing cheekrest and installing it back will harm "consistency"... ok, ok. i'm just being lazy...
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 02-14-2018, 9:06 PM
calpik calpik is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 27
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyjr View Post
calpik
I know , but like I used to tell people before I retired -
I did not write the book .
It you think a dirty primer pocket , flash hole , burnt
powder inside case or a combination of any don't affect
pressure , you are right up there with the press makers .
They think reloaders [ a lot do ] just decap and reload .
The rest of us waste our time and money by buying things
to clean the cases [ vibrators , tumblers , sonics , prep
stations , media , primer pocket reamers / cleaners ]
To me a dirty case is like using a 2 die set .
Absolutely agree. If someone wants top performance - everything has to be the same from shot to shot, from load to load. i.e. crystal clear brass, etc

But as I said: with my equipment I did not see any difference with dirty or clean brass, because my baseline is pretty low: 0.5-1MOA.
The only drawback of not cleaning - have to clean collet die relatively often or it will bind a case.
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 02-14-2018, 9:52 PM
tonyjr tonyjr is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,222
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

I spray lube the bottle necks before depriming .
This means 2 or 3 reloading sessions [ between 200 to 600
cases ] I disassemble and run thru sonic [ the dies ]
I have plenty of help , so not a big deal .
__________________
life member - CRPA and NRA
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 02-15-2018, 6:39 PM
slamfire1 slamfire1 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 208
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Let me offer this: your action is sliding around in the stock. Factory bedding is generally horrible. The action is often bowed, the front of the action slides around during combusition, and, the barrel is usually touching the forend, often in irregular locations.

This is my M700 Remington in 6.5 Swede. You can clearly see horizontal movement.



I did a couple of things. This Remington 700 had a raised pressure point in the forend which pressed on the barrel. I scrapped that away. The barrel was also touching the sides of the forend, so I centered the barrel in the stock, scrapped away wood, and that barrel is now free floated.

Similar to what I did here. This 1950ís custom rifle, the barrel was fully inletted and in contact with the forend. You can see how bullets were flung left and rifle.



After bedding the action and free floating the barrel, it is a 2 MOA rifle, which is better than it was, and is about all it will do. But the groups are roundish.



All the way to 300 yards;



Now the M700 6.5 Swede, after bedding at 300 yards:



Whatever left to right movement is not the fault of the action or its bedding. I consider a sub five inch, ten shot group, at 300 yards, pretty good for a lightweight sporter rifle.

My Ruger M77, you can more or less see horizontal movement in the group, it actually got worse the more the rifle was shot.



I drilled an oversized hole for the front action screw



Cast a pillar and once it cured, routed out a bunch of wood.



Used white Tex Marine for the contrast.



And it shot much better.



Playing around with sizing dies and all that won't fix a bedding problem. I am going to say, about the first thing anyone ought to do with a wood stocked, or even a tupperware stocked factory rifle, is bed the action and free float the barrel.
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 02-15-2018, 6:57 PM
LynnJr LynnJr is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 5,715
iTrader: 7 / 100%
Default

Actually Bedding was said in post 16 about a week ago.
__________________
Lynn Dragoman, Jr.
Southwest Regional Director
Unlimited Range Shooters Association (URSA)
www.unlimitedrange.org
Not a commercial business.
URSA - Competition starts at 2000 yards!
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 02-17-2018, 6:13 PM
ar15barrels's Avatar
ar15barrels ar15barrels is offline
I need a LIFE!!
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Van Nuys
Posts: 43,501
iTrader: 93 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by calpik View Post
Noticed a strange thing, with some bullets/powder groups move horizontally more than vertically.

What's the reason of such behavior? (rifle is not bedded, 223rem, weatherby vanguard)
Shooter position behind gun.
Hand position on stock/trigger.
Trigger control.
Parallax adjustment.
__________________
Randall Rausch

AR work: www.ar15barrels.com
Bolt actions: www.700barrels.com
Foreign Semi Autos: www.akbarrels.com
Glock, XD and M&P pistols, Benelli and Remington shotguns: barrel, sight, trigger and receiver work.
Most work performed while-you-wait, evening and weekend appointments available.
Founding member of the CAPRC
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 03-08-2018, 4:56 PM
calpik calpik is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 27
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

alright... some new results:

I put some glue into the stock and screwed in action.
Now groups stopped jumping around on a paper, i.e. I still see horizontal movement of the POI with increasing charge weight, but not so much as it was before.

Now all groups (difference is 1 full grain of powder) are in the same area - 0.25inch away from each other.

I like that, but I don't like the fact that to get a descent group I need to put more powder (so "good spot" shifted from low charges to high charges). And they became more 0.9-1.2 moa in average. - i'm ok with that, but it was better before, so I want to get it back


questions time:
1. action sits supertight in the stock, but to get it there i have to push with a lot of force (or put the screw and tight). After that previous method of bedding job check shows that there is no movement of the barrel.
Should i remove some epoxy? to let it drop into the stock, instead of pushing it in

2. i also left some glue under the barrel (in front of recoil lug) - should i remove it?

3. should I play with action screws before damaging epoxy?

Last edited by calpik; 03-09-2018 at 7:13 PM..
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 4:19 AM.




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Proudly hosted by GeoVario the Premier 2A host.
Calguns.net, the 'Calguns' name and all associated variants and logos are ® Trademark and © Copyright 2002-2018, Calguns.net an Incorporated Company All Rights Reserved.