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  #1  
Old 11-22-2019, 8:54 PM
Geofois Geofois is offline
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Default Refinishing 1894 stock...paint thinner, steel wool?

Was searching on youtube and here. One guy said just paint remover/thinner, course steel wool, then 0000, then apply finish. I saw another video one guy sanded then used boiled linseed oil. I have all that stuff already. I attached the pics. You can see where the finish has worn away but the wood looks fine. I would be fine with a natural look with linseed oil if that's protective enough or maybe there is a modern greywash that would look sweet. What do you guys recommend for best way to remove the current finish?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 1894 stock (1).jpg (84.7 KB, 84 views)
File Type: jpg 1894 stock (2).jpg (89.9 KB, 71 views)

Last edited by Geofois; 11-22-2019 at 8:56 PM..
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  #2  
Old 11-22-2019, 9:07 PM
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Jasco to remove clear lacquer and Danish oil. I have done several this way.
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Old 11-22-2019, 9:12 PM
Geofois Geofois is offline
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So just remove the lacquer and then put the danish oil. Does the jasco take it to the bare wood? Do you have a sample before and after pic? Thanks DZ357.
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Old 11-22-2019, 9:17 PM
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The Jasco on removes the lacquer. The stain and grain sealer if used is not removed. The Danish oil is applied a couple of times or more. It will richen the original finish. I have only done this on walnut stocks. Most model 94’s are walnut. The 94 Rangers are birch, haven’t refinished birch.
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Old 11-22-2019, 10:16 PM
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I use Jasco,just spead it on let it sit for a bit then use a dish scrubber all the while dipping the brush in water might take a few times to get it all off.Sand with 220.
For Finish you have to decide what the wood looks good in if you like the wood natural so to speak use Formsby it is a tung oil/varnish you rub in and let it set overnight then use 0000 steel wool to polish it a bit,I usually do about 5 coatings.
You an also add stain on top of the formsby just keep rubbing it in to smooth out the blend I use a shop towel.I took red sedona minwax stain and rubbed it in with the formsby on a old mossberg 500 walnut stock that I put on a Maverick 88 7+1 totally changes the look of it.Came out looking like a deep rosewood.
Dont worry about screwing up you can just take it back down and change it.
Good luck with it.
I have used this on Walnut to birch and some uknown wood comes out great when you get the handle of it.
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Old 11-22-2019, 10:45 PM
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I have some Klean Strip paint thinner. Will that do a good job removing the finish also? If i just use the formsby will that let the natural wood color stay?
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Old 11-23-2019, 8:27 PM
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Most likely it will do fine,if in doubt use it on a old table or chair on the underside to see how it works or even a small spot on the side of the house.
Yes Formsby will keep the natural color of the wood and the varnish in it gives it a nice gloss.
Scrub it clean.
Let the wood dry overnight.
Sand it with 220.
Wipe off the wood dust.
Apply the finish let stand overnight.
Next use 0000 steel wool lightly.
Apply another coat let dry overnight,then just follow the above steps again and again till you are happy,like i said i usually apply 5 coats before I am happy.
From the looks of your Rifle that will look real nice when you are done.
I pick up guns nobody wants for cheap because they dont look pretty as long as it is functional I clean it up.Bought a Chinese H@R Remington 870 clone for 120 because it looked bad,turns out someone shot it once and put it in the back of the closet for 15 years and all the dirt/dust on it made it look disgusting,cleaned it up and had a brand new shotgun,polished the inside receiver,painted the Stock FDE while covering the checkering to keep it black,put on a heat shield that I painted FDE.Looks great and is slick as snot.
Picking up another Shotgun this week a old Winchester 1200 30 inch vented barrel,jeweled bolt that I got for 100 just because it has been well used but well taken care of.Metal and Bluing look fine just dull,stock is a nice walnut with some scrapes no real dents and a bit dull,when I am done with it,it will look brand new.
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Old 11-23-2019, 8:41 PM
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That's awesome. You probably know this technique, but just in case. On Youtube one guy put a wet sheet against the stock and used an iron to heat out the dents and pull out more varnish from the wood.
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Old 11-23-2019, 10:18 PM
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I tried that on my Garand that was VERY battlefield worn worked on some not others.Did look nice after I was done even with the scars.Some of the scars stayed a dark black,some people even pay for that look.
You might be looking at the iraq8888 guys vids he actually said some guy paid him for the battlefield look on a new AR15 he used chains and whatnot on it,I just dont know about some people lol.
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Old 11-26-2019, 7:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfmann View Post
I tried that on my Garand that was VERY battlefield worn worked on some not others.Did look nice after I was done even with the scars.Some of the scars stayed a dark black,some people even pay for that look.
You might be looking at the iraq8888 guys vids he actually said some guy paid him for the battlefield look on a new AR15 he used chains and whatnot on it,I just dont know about some people lol.
I think I'll need to use the iron technique. I used the paint thinner but it wasn't the gel kind and didn't seem to take off the stain much but some light sanding did the trick. I had to use my finger nails and 0000 steel wool to clean out the dented areas where the stain was inside but if I can pull up all the wood fibers that would be good. I'm taking a break but it looks like I need to use some more light sanding or steel wool to get some more stain off maybe but the iron might do the trick also. Maybe a medium brown. I wanted light wood but the wood is ok and maybe not ideal for light colored stain and that's probably not the right shade for this rifle. I have boiled linseed oil but it will probably leave it too blonde maybe. I'll goto home depot and see what they have. Did you say True Oil before or was that someone else?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg stock (1).jpg (93.2 KB, 29 views)
File Type: jpg stock (2).jpg (94.2 KB, 28 views)
File Type: jpg stock (3).jpg (94.7 KB, 26 views)
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  #11  
Old 11-26-2019, 7:41 PM
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A wood dye is the best product to enhance the color. An alternative is the brown leather shoe dye from Angelus or Fiebing. They are available at the cobbler and can be thinned down with denatured alcohol to keep it from getting too dark.
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Old 11-26-2019, 7:55 PM
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Is wood dye at home depot? Does the wood need to be sealed also or does it also protect it?

If I use the gunstock stain do I need to use the poly urethane finish after? I best youtube some more

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Varathan...9735/305502018
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Old 11-26-2019, 9:13 PM
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The spirit or alcohol-based wood dyes give a richer color since they penetrate deeper than the stain, which is just on the wood surface. Both need to be finished with either linseed oil or some other coating such as polyurethane or Birchwood Casey Tru-oil.
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Old 11-26-2019, 10:02 PM
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I have linseed oil now and was thinking about using it to finish the wood. Everyone seems to have their preference but someone said the linseed oil takes a long time to finally dry, like months. How long before I can take the rifle to the range with linseed oil? I also heard it keeps soaking into the wood but I think raw is the one that keeps soaking but boiled has a bigger molecule or some such thing. I've watched too many youtube videos they are all melting together. I also read linseed oil makes the finish darker. than true oil. Is that true?
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Old 11-27-2019, 3:11 PM
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Havnt used linseed in a long time dosnt really darken much,drying is usally a matter of temp and humidity.
Looks like you are doing good on that stock.
I just like the formsby because it is tungoil and varnish all in one no extra steps.
poly finish is sticky and harder to smooth out at least for me.
It takes work but is fun in the end you will amaze your friends when you are done.
I should add that the wood dictates what looks good,wet the wood and you will see what the wood will look like in a natural finish.
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Old 11-27-2019, 3:17 PM
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The gunsmiths at Colonial Williamsburg, VA use Tried & True varnish and I use it too. Very nice finish in different tones, feels great, easy application - https://www.triedandtruewoodfinish.com/
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Old 11-27-2019, 3:24 PM
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Problem is that is not a walnut stock. It's a lighter wood stained to look like walnut. You'll need to restain to get the dark look back. Lots of manufacturers dropped real walnut in the late 80s due to cost. Bass wood was popular.
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Old 11-27-2019, 3:28 PM
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people may differ but I would say that it is walnut.
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Old 11-27-2019, 4:06 PM
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I was just about to ask what this wood was. It is really really light even when soaked. I used the iron steam technique and kept soaking it and then wet it down just for the picture to make sure.

After reading the below article I'm concerned if I have a maple stock maybe I'll need a gel stain that prevents blotching.

http://sparetimeactivities.net/StockStain.htm

This was from another forum so I guess birch as the same issue as maple
If you decide to stain the stock (and it is birch), then you will first want to go over it with something like Min Wax Wood Prep. after you have removed all the old finish, and are ready for staining. Particularly if you are using an oil based penetrating stain (standard Min Wax stuff). What the "Wood Prep" does is soak into the porous areas of the stock. Otherwise you will end up with a blotchy looking stock. Learned this one first hand. An alternative is to try a Gel Stain. These sit on the surface, and can be rubbed out more evenly. -But are more prone to scratching off. After staining, you will need to apply a top coat of some sort like previously mentioned.
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Last edited by Geofois; 11-27-2019 at 8:10 PM..
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Old 11-27-2019, 9:17 PM
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Birch or some other wood to mimic walnut when dyed. They do get "blotchy" when regular oil stains are used. Alcohol-based dyes penetrate deeper and more evenly.

Last edited by smoothy8500; 11-27-2019 at 9:20 PM..
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Old 11-28-2019, 12:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smoothy8500 View Post
Birch or some other wood to mimic walnut when dyed. They do get "blotchy" when regular oil stains are used. Alcohol-based dyes penetrate deeper and more evenly.
I've read gel stain will prevent blotching on maple so maybe it will work well on birch. Maybe this one will work. I'll research some more. Not sure if they takes care of protecting the wood also.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Varathan...-305584078-_-N

Someone on another forum discussion mentioned Birchwood Casey's Tru-Oil stock finishing kit. The walnut stain is water based and mentions birch
Walnut Wood Stain - Water-soluble stain is sun-fast, true-to-color and non-bleeding. Produces a clear, rich color without grain clouding or smearing. Walnut Stain is a true, brown-walnut color for the traditional look. Color intensity is easily controlled by adding water to concentrate or using full strength for light collared woods such as birch.

https://www.amazon.com/Birchwood-Cas...8-1&th=1&psc=1

A guy using the kit doesn't use the sheen bottle and I already have blo so maybe I'll try the walnut stain and see.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSaU84XGekc

Last edited by Geofois; 11-28-2019 at 1:33 AM..
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Old 11-28-2019, 2:11 AM
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I think we have a winner. Kept googling and found there is a Rusty Walnut Stain by Birchwood Casey. The kit just comes with the regular walnut but I want the rustish color. Correct me if I'm wrong but I should be able to apply blo in the end right?

https://www.amazon.com/Birchwood-Cas...4935630&sr=8-1
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Old 11-28-2019, 2:47 AM
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Paint remover then light sanding to remove any blemishes. Minwax oil stains for your desired effect.
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Old 11-28-2019, 7:06 PM
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Quote:
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Paint remover then light sanding to remove any blemishes. Minwax oil stains for your desired effect.
From everything I read for birch you should use the pre stain wood conditioner or it get's really funky. Maybe some get lucky. The gel stain works better for birch and then birchwood casey's water based stain seems to be the best and is made for wood like birch. Have you had success with birch and minwax with nothing else? I'm new to wood refinishing so I only know what I youtube or google.
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Old 12-02-2019, 1:20 PM
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Tell me what you guys think so far. Just a couple passes of the Birchwood casey rusty walnut. Is it too light or just right ish? I'll let it dry and see how the color is and maybe give it a couple more passes then start with the boiled linseed oil. They might even make it slightly darker, not sure.

The hand-guard piece you can see seems blotchy even with this stain which is made for birch. When I move it some fade in and out so it must be the flow of the grains. Hopefully it just looks cool when it's coated with oil. Maybe when it's darker it will be better. I'll keep using full strength stain now and make it darker. These pics are with it diluted. I'll update later.
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File Type: jpg rusty stock (1).jpg (83.1 KB, 21 views)
File Type: jpg rusty stock (2).jpg (84.4 KB, 18 views)

Last edited by Geofois; 12-03-2019 at 12:50 AM..
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Old 12-03-2019, 2:55 AM
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great job

i too prefer the wood coloration to be darker if that helps....you might test just a little spot in a hidden area with the oil if you're unsure
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Old 12-03-2019, 4:03 AM
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That looks nice. I prefer a little darker. Tongue Oil would give that a richer tone and a finish.
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Old 12-03-2019, 6:42 AM
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I'd agree that another application of stain would look better. The tung or linseed oil over the stain will darken it only slightly more. After staining and drying you will notice some "whiskers" or raised grain from the water or alcohol in the stain. Give it a once-over with the steel wool before the oil.

The nice thing about water/alcohol based stain is if you went a little too dark, it can be lightened slightly by wiping down with denatured alcohol-soaked rags. As for oil, tung oil dries quicker and is a slightly harder finish.

Last edited by smoothy8500; 12-03-2019 at 6:45 AM..
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Old 12-03-2019, 6:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geofois View Post
Tell me what you guys think so far. Just a couple passes of the Birchwood casey rusty walnut. Is it too light or just right ish? I'll let it dry and see how the color is and maybe give it a couple more passes then start with the boiled linseed oil. They might even make it slightly darker, not sure.

The hand-guard piece you can see seems blotchy even with this stain which is made for birch. When I move it some fade in and out so it must be the flow of the grains. Hopefully it just looks cool when it's coated with oil. Maybe when it's darker it will be better. I'll keep using full strength stain now and make it darker. These pics are with it diluted. I'll update later.
Dang that looks good.
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Old 12-03-2019, 10:08 AM
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I ordered the regular walnut colored stain to give it some more brown tones. I watched a youtube with a guy that went over his stocks with red and brown stain and it came out really nice. Thanks guys.
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