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  #41  
Old 11-15-2017, 7:51 AM
Dabnis Dabnis is offline
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At 82 there's no shame in passing off oil changing duties to a PRO , just double check that PRO's work as they aren't as good as you.
A lot of 25 yr old kids today can't even change a tire ... if they even know they have a spare.
And judging by your pics and posts , I have little doubt that you're a handy guy to have around.
Most folks today couldn't drive that rig down an empty 2 lane hi-way without screwing it up .. let alone backing it down a tricky ramp.
As far as being uncivilized ..... my dad used to take me as a kid all day for days on end cutting firewood.
Cut down a tree and cut it up , load it , unload it , split it "by hand" stack it , etc
As we both got older and I moved out , etc ..... he started ordering wood delivered , at first it was long logs , he did the rest ..... and then he'd buy it already cut up and do the rest .............. and then he went to buying it already cut and split ................ and then he started paying to have it stacked.
Now he relies more on the furnace.
Anyhow , he calls me over one day.
Gives me a load of shovels , axes , mauls , wedges , and even pick axes ..... tells me they are now mine .......... and he referred to these as "tools of ignorance"
I found that amusing at the time but have slowly come to see his point.
"Uncivilized"? An attempt at a little humor. Sounds like your Dad thinks a lot like my Dad used to. He worked two jobs for many years, had me selling papers on the corner when I was about 10. We fixed, or made virtually everything ourselves. Looking back on it, it probably would have been better to buy some things "Ready made" . I did some arc welding, tried to weld up a new fuel tank for our Willys pick up. Couldn't master the thin material, ended up with a pile of scrap sheet metal.

Our 27 year old grandson may be an exception to today's millennials. He actually wanted to learn how to work on engines & enjoys working with wood.
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  #42  
Old 11-15-2017, 3:06 PM
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Hi , you quoted the word "Uncivilized" and put on a question mark with an explanation.
This gives me the impression you may have read my words earlier and thought that the word or something offended me or I was becoming defensive.
If you did think any of this , that would be incorrect.
What I was trying to do was compare your word of "Uncivilized" to the way my dad put things by referring to "tools of ignorance."
And I seen a similarity in those two phrases I was trying to point that out.
I bring this up because I didn't want you to think otherwise and if it was anyone's fault for the misunderstanding, it would probably be mine as I sometimes write like I think and not the best and that could be hard to decipher especially when online and not talking in person.
And for what it's worth , it sounds like your grandson may be a reflection of his good parents , and I'd bet you don't fall too from your own fathers tree either.
Both of which I mean as compliments.
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Old 11-15-2017, 3:19 PM
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Hi , you quoted the word "Uncivilized" and put on a question mark with an explanation.
This gives me the impression you may have read my words earlier and thought that the word or something offended me or I was becoming defensive.
If you did think any of this , that would be incorrect.
What I was trying to do was compare your word of "Uncivilized" to the way my dad put things by referring to "tools of ignorance."
And I seen a similarity in those two phrases I was trying to point that out.
I bring this up because I didn't want you to think otherwise and if it was anyone's fault for the misunderstanding, it would probably be mine as I sometimes write like I think and not the best and that could be hard to decipher especially when online and not talking in person.
And for what it's worth , it sounds like your grandson may be a reflection of his good parents , and I'd bet you don't fall too from your own fathers tree either.
Both of which I mean as compliments.
Thank you for the compliments. "Uncivilized" I see, I think. In any event, no problem, no offense, life is good, am waiting for spring, when the ice is off the lakes.
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  #44  
Old 11-16-2017, 10:15 AM
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Thank you for the compliments. "Uncivilized" I see, I think. In any event, no problem, no offense, life is good, am waiting for spring, when the ice is off the lakes.
I just put my cycle away for the winter today ... a bit late I suppose.
I'd like to move someplace where there is no such thing as "winterizing" and "summarizing"
But the trade off is those places get a bit warm in July
Some guys ice fish on the frozen lakes around here ...... not this kid tho ... momma didn't raise no fool
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  #45  
Old 11-16-2017, 2:09 PM
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Well, thats largely to be expected in such a venue. The equivalent of the city park. Free (type C?) WA in a previously salted field. Lotta buffoons are attracted. You'll find more serious hunters with more etiquette where there's at least a modicum of investment required.

Part of pheasant hunting on public ground involves adjusting your plan when others gain position on you. If you think you're gonna strike south and maintain some form of line you better have a closed circuit. Even with a small group and no one else in the field, I largely follow my dog while also directing him to cover after the first bit.

No one "comes out of nowhere" if you're paying attention.

If the cover wasn't relegated to one area, the birds should be somewhat dispersed. Don't worry too much that there's a bunch of shooting "over there". Work what's available. Not to say you can't use the hunting pressure of others to your advantage, but there's no need to be in the fray. Birds are often running well ahead of hunters/dogs. If they keep getting the shooting they're working cover better, using others' pressure better, better dogs, etc.
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Old 11-16-2017, 4:27 PM
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If you don't have blockers your doing it wrong....
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  #47  
Old 11-16-2017, 4:44 PM
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If you don't have blockers your doing it wrong....
Ummm no. You're doing it with limited numbers, limited access, limited terrain, etc. There's a number of ways to hunt pheasant succesfully.

I'd say if you're hunting a square of standing corn in South Dakota without blockers you might want to reassess your methods.
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Old 11-16-2017, 6:12 PM
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Ummm no. You're doing it with limited numbers, limited access, limited terrain, etc. There's a number of ways to hunt pheasant succesfully.

I'd say if you're hunting a square of standing corn in South Dakota without blockers you might want to reassess your methods.
In PA , me and the guy I hunt ring necks with do not have hunting dogs.
We have to wait til after a fresh snow ..... but then we go find tracks and follow the tracks.
Very little bird hunters at that time and plenty of birds can still be found.
Sometimes we flush it and sometimes it's just running through the woods.
We do rabbits almost the same way , except we jump on the brush piles and snow isn't really needed if you know where they may be holding up.... however this is best left to the younger crowd cause it's tiring.
And I'd really like for him to get a hunting dog...................



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  #49  
Old 11-17-2017, 7:31 AM
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I just put my cycle away for the winter today ... a bit late I suppose.
I'd like to move someplace where there is no such thing as "winterizing" and "summarizing"
But the trade off is those places get a bit warm in July
Some guys ice fish on the frozen lakes around here ...... not this kid tho ... momma didn't raise no fool
My wife & I fished the ice for about 5 years. however, we always waited to see other bigger people go out before we did. My wife didn't like the constant grinding & groaning sounds, or seeing crack lines. We finally gave it up for that reason & the difficulties of scrambling back up the long steep bank, in the snow.

If you live on the California coast, the winters are fairly mild, & not too hot in the summer. For eight years we lived about 100 yards back from the ocean, exactly over the San Andreas fault. My tools rusted inside the garage. My wife hated it. Finally moved to Petaluma, about 20 airline miles in from the coast, pretty nice climate, overall.
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Old 11-17-2017, 7:43 AM
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Ummm no. You're doing it with limited numbers, limited access, limited terrain, etc. There's a number of ways to hunt pheasant succesfully.

I'd say if you're hunting a square of standing corn in South Dakota without blockers you might want to reassess your methods.
My Dad & I hunted in South Dakota for many years, mostly just the two of us, without a dog.

Once in a while the farm owner, my cousin, would invite us to hunt with his group of friends & paid hunters. 10 to 12 hunters down the corn fields, 3 or so blockers at the end. At the end of the drive, it got kind of wild & wooly, but nobody got shot.

We mainly hunted ditches, soil bank, pot holes, & milo. We did hunt corn sometimes & found the best way for just the two of was to hunt very slowly,
back & forth, & stop about every 100 yards or so, then wait for at least a couple of minutes. Apparently, that must have confused the birds, & they would flush, most very close to, us.
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  #51  
Old 11-17-2017, 11:37 AM
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My Dad & I hunted in South Dakota for many years, mostly just the two of us, without a dog.

Once in a while the farm owner, my cousin, would invite us to hunt with his group of friends & paid hunters. 10 to 12 hunters down the corn fields, 3 or so blockers at the end. At the end of the drive, it got kind of wild & wooly, but nobody got shot.

We mainly hunted ditches, soil bank, pot holes, & milo. We did hunt corn sometimes & found the best way for just the two of was to hunt very slowly,
back & forth, & stop about every 100 yards or so, then wait for at least a couple of minutes. Apparently, that must have confused the birds, & they would flush, most very close to, us.
Ya...when hunting the corn all must agree no shots where the birds aren't higher than the corn. No ground shots, etc. Actually that rule should pertain regardless of cover without knowing exactly where everyone is. We've done the 6-10 guys pushing and 2-3 blockers. Certainly a viable method when the conditions allow. Blockers get most the shooting, but the pushers get some too. Still,most the birds came from the sloughs (what they call the grassy depressions (potholes) too wet to farm) in the afternoon, after we pushed them from the corn or soybeans earlier.

Stopping is a good practice in most pheasant hunting. As you're walking they can monitor where you are and stay ahead, slip behind, etc. If you stop, they can get nervous since they lose track of you and think they might be busted.

When you don't have the staff, fence lines, potholes, wind breaks (shelter belts...been trying to remember that term), railroad tracks, etc. are more productive. It's legal to hunt the section road fence lines regardless of ownership/permission. Where I occasionally go in South Dakota now, the corn is "chemical tilled", which means no undergrowth. The birds run well ahead. Couple buddies went this year without the usual group of locals. They didn't even bother with the corn. I wish it wasn't so damn far away or I had the time to make a leisurely drive out.
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  #52  
Old 11-17-2017, 12:44 PM
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Ya...when hunting the corn all must agree no shots where the birds aren't higher than the corn. No ground shots, etc. Actually that rule should pertain regardless of cover without knowing exactly where everyone is. We've done the 6-10 guys pushing and 2-3 blockers. Certainly a viable method when the conditions allow. Blockers get most the shooting, but the pushers get some too. Still,most the birds came from the sloughs (what they call the grassy depressions (potholes) too wet to farm) in the afternoon, after we pushed them from the corn or soybeans earlier.

Stopping is a good practice in most pheasant hunting. As you're walking they can monitor where you are and stay ahead, slip behind, etc. If you stop, they can get nervous since they lose track of you and think they might be busted.

When you don't have the staff, fence lines, potholes, wind breaks, railroad tracks, etc. are more productive. It's legal to hunt the section road fence lines regardless of ownership/permission. Where I occasionally go in South Dakota now, the corn is "chemical tilled", which means no undergrowth. The birds run well ahead. Couple buddies went this year without the usual group of locals. They didn't even bother with the corn. I wish it wasn't so damn far away or I had the time to make a leisurely drive out.
Yes, we saw both in South Dakota, & in California the farming methods "Improve" over the years, such as land leveling, which eliminated many of the low spot pot holes, along with all the thick natural cover.

In South Dakota much of the land that was in soil bank, which had good natural cover year round, was gradually being put back into production.
Harvesting dates were gradually coming earlier, leaving little to no cover, or feed, for the winter. My cousin said he put lots & lots of Pheasants through the harvesters. As mentioned, many of the farmers in that area of South Dakota were establishing bird clubs on their farms. We would occasionally get some of their escapee planted birds, which had little "Blinders", like they put on horses, on their eyes, eliminating their side vision.

The best hunting in corn was when it was not profitable for the farmers to mechanically pick the corn due to drought. They would put the hogs in the field to feed on what corn there was. He called it "Hogging it down" The hogs pretty much broke the stalks down making pretty good ground cover which kept the Pheasants from running so much, flushing closer.

Anyway, "Progress" is not always good for hunting.
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Old 11-17-2017, 9:02 PM
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Yes, we saw both in South Dakota, & in California the farming methods "Improve" over the years, such as land leveling, which eliminated many of the low spot pot holes, along with all the thick natural cover.

In South Dakota much of the land that was in soil bank, which had good natural cover year round, was gradually being put back into production.
Harvesting dates were gradually coming earlier, leaving little to no cover, or feed, for the winter. My cousin said he put lots & lots of Pheasants through the harvesters. As mentioned, many of the farmers in that area of South Dakota were establishing bird clubs on their farms. We would occasionally get some of their escapee planted birds, which had little "Blinders", like they put on horses, on their eyes, eliminating their side vision.

The best hunting in corn was when it was not profitable for the farmers to mechanically pick the corn due to drought. They would put the hogs in the field to feed on what corn there was. He called it "Hogging it down" The hogs pretty much broke the stalks down making pretty good ground cover which kept the Pheasants from running so much, flushing closer.

Anyway, "Progress" is not always good for hunting.
Where we hunt just above Mitchell the landowner told me they can't do land planing like all the Sac Valley. They can't drain potholes to produce more cropland. That maintains the potholes and sloughs for year round cover. The CRP program gives some incentive to not try to farm every last inch or turn it over to cows, etc.

The chemical tilling (roundup) I don't think hurts pheasant production, but sure makes hunting them in the corn less productive.

This year they were very dry and most broods didn't make it to maturity I'm told.
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Old 11-18-2017, 7:30 AM
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Where we hunt just above Mitchell the landowner told me they can't do land planing like all the Sac Valley. They can't drain potholes to produce more cropland. That maintains the potholes and sloughs for year round cover. The CRP program gives some incentive to not try to farm every last inch or turn it over to cows, etc.

The chemical tilling (roundup) I don't think hurts pheasant production, but sure makes hunting them in the corn less productive.

This year they were very dry and most broods didn't make it to maturity I'm told.
We hunted about 40 miles west of Mitchell, near Plankington. My cousin raised beef cattle & hogs, & about 2,000 acres of corn & Milo for feed. IIRC, you are right, there wasn't near as much land leveling type of activity as in California. However, many of the "Low spots" were converted to production, & many of the fence lines were harvested right up to the wire.

We hunted there from about 1950 to 1985. My cousin told us that having land in the soil bank was less profitable than crop production, except for dry years. Anyway, even back then we could see the overall trend of fewer wild birds, but we only hunted in that one area.

Some years later we went to Nebraska for about 4 days, missed the opener, I had one shot, & missed it, "Pheasant fever", I guess, didn't cover the bird well enough.
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Old 11-18-2017, 12:52 PM
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It use to be good out there but now they barely plant any birds. Heard someone did get shot out there this year.
I quit going there last year, chp friend that helps plant said very few birds are planted now.
And it has always been a free for all out there, no organized drives or supervision.
You have to join a club and shoot planters in California, no more wild birds except for small pockets around towns or private land (kind of like Deer now).
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Old 11-18-2017, 2:04 PM
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There are no wild pheasants left in CA. Those are mechanical birds trained to act and look like the real thing. I'm
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Old 11-18-2017, 3:19 PM
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Husky, nice avatar, one of my riding partners had one, mid 70's maybe?

Remember these? AJS 360 Stormer, Had one from 1970 to about 1974. Leaked oil on the show room floor.

Last time we hunted Pheasants in California, between Colusa & Gridley, was about 1970, or so. There were still a few native birds mixed in with the planters, but not too many. With ever improved farming methods today, native, or "wild" birds are likely just hold overs that survived the winter, & the rice harvesters?

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Old 11-18-2017, 3:41 PM
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I think some of you guys don't give pheasant the respect they deserve.

Growing up in the I.V. at one point they stopped planting them and FNG thought they could not survive, they didn't, they thrived.

I've pulled chessie pups off nests while training often enough to know there are certainly plenty of wild birds around.
Beating them at there own game is another matter.

Coursing an open field ain't the way to do it, you need to trap them with a dog in pockets of cover they can't just run out the end of.
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Old 11-18-2017, 4:44 PM
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It's been 20-years since I seen any population of wild birds around here. We had a ranch in the Sloughouse area when I was young and maintained area's for the pheasants.
Everything is plowed under now, no cover or food for the birds.

Mt parents sold out in the mid-70's and bought a place in North-Central Idaho, ton's of wild birds there now.
You get tired of harvesting birds and deer for that matter. My father quit hunting after moving there, no challenge I guess.
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Old 11-18-2017, 5:50 PM
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We hunted about 40 miles west of Mitchell, near Plankington. My cousin raised beef cattle & hogs, & about 2,000 acres of corn & Milo for feed. IIRC, you are right, there wasn't near as much land leveling type of activity as in California. However, many of the "Low spots" were converted to production, & many of the fence lines were harvested right up to the wire.

We hunted there from about 1950 to 1985. My cousin told us that having land in the soil bank was less profitable than crop production, except for dry years. Anyway, even back then we could see the overall trend of fewer wild birds, but we only hunted in that one area.

Some years later we went to Nebraska for about 4 days, missed the opener, I had one shot, & missed it, "Pheasant fever", I guess, didn't cover the bird well enough.
When I make it to SD, it's Huron. About 30 minutes north of Mitchell. Should be same habitat (prairie pothole region).

Not many wild birds left in Sac Valley. They're having to pant places like Gray Lodge even. They used to shoot 700 birds opening day and trap birds to plant elsewhere. Used to drive around rice country in the a.m. or dusk and see plenty. Others squashed on the roads. Not anymore.

I was somewhat impressed with the number of birds at Klamath. Access has issues, but there's birds.
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Old 11-19-2017, 1:26 AM
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Originally Posted by WMG View Post
In PA , me and the guy I hunt ring necks with do not have hunting dogs.
We have to wait til after a fresh snow ..... but then we go find tracks and follow the tracks.
Very little bird hunters at that time and plenty of birds can still be found.
Sometimes we flush it and sometimes it's just running through the woods.
We do rabbits almost the same way , except we jump on the brush piles and snow isn't really needed if you know where they may be holding up.... however this is best left to the younger crowd cause it's tiring.
And I'd really like for him to get a hunting dog...................



Intriguing hunting method, much like stalking deer mid-day.
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Old 11-19-2017, 1:34 AM
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There are wild birds all along the Sacramento/Feather River drainages, from Red Bluff to Verona. Not easy to hunt and lots of private property, but there are definitely wild birds there, all year long.
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Old 11-19-2017, 4:11 AM
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There are wild birds all along the Sacramento/Feather River drainages, from Red Bluff to Verona. Not easy to hunt and lots of private property, but there are definitely wild birds there, all year long.
Well...they are residentgame birds, so they would be there all year long.

The major decline in pheasants in Sac Valley is no secret. Places like Dry Creek and Gray Lodge are shooting like 10% of historic. DFW, Pheasants Forever have been analyzing this decline for years.

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Total pheasant harvest on public areas in the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys declined from a high of 4,828 roosters in 1998 to 461 last year.
https://cdfgnews.wordpress.com/2017/...-opener-nears/
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Old 11-19-2017, 7:17 AM
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My brother and I raised them and sold them to several gun clubs back in the 70s. They would pay us to let 100s of birds out in the fields the night before a shoot was to happen. they also paid us to follow groups out of sight and shoot down the birds with 22lrs with silencers when we could see the hunters were unable to hit the birds. They would think they shoot them and be happy with their hunt. Then after all hunters had left we would yell dilley dilley and all the un shot birds would fly back to our truck and get back in their crates. It made for a long day but the money was good
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Old 11-19-2017, 7:40 AM
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Originally Posted by JagerDog View Post
When I make it to SD, it's Huron. About 30 minutes north of Mitchell. Should be same habitat (prairie pothole region).

Not many wild birds left in Sac Valley. They're having to pant places like Gray Lodge even. They used to shoot 700 birds opening day and trap birds to plant elsewhere. Used to drive around rice country in the a.m. or dusk and see plenty. Others squashed on the roads. Not anymore.

I was somewhat impressed with the number of birds at Klamath. Access has issues, but there's birds.
We hunted in the Huron area a few times, just went up there & tried to get on wherever possible. IIRC, there was lots of creek bottom land, & it was somewhat more hilly than around Plankington. We never did too well there, not having access to crop or farm land, & finally quit going there, as we had access to some of my cousin's land in the Plankington area.

We had the same problem when we went to Nebraska, missed the opener & had to scratch for places to hunt. Most of the birds had been cleaned out on the opener, & many of the farmers would not let us hunt on their land. Maybe it was the California plates on our car?
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