Calguns.net  

Home My iTrader Join the NRA Donate to CGSSA Sponsors CGN Google Search
CA Semiauto Ban(AW)ID Flowchart CA Handgun Ban ID Flowchart CA Shotgun Ban ID Flowchart
Go Back   Calguns.net > FIREARMS DISCUSSIONS > Curio & Relic/Black Powder
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Curio & Relic/Black Powder Curio & Relics and Black Powder Firearms, Old School shooting fun!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-11-2017, 12:56 PM
Garandimal's Avatar
Garandimal Garandimal is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,465
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default M1 Garand—Save the Last Clip (American Rifleman)

M1 Garand—Save the Last Clip
by Mark Keefe - Monday, June 6, 2016


Fully 80 years after the gun called by the U.S. Army Ordnance Department the “U.S. Semi-Automatic Rifle, Caliber .30, M1” was adopted, the Garand rifle still continues to have a place with American shooters and collectors. It is a special place, one reverently reserved for not just a rifle but for a generation of Americans who did no less than save the world from Axis oppression and face down the evil of Communist aggression.

The guns are still used on the range today. The Civilian Marksmanship Program runs its Garand Match. And, when you look at the service rifle class of NRA Highpower Rifle both on range at Camp Perry and at local clubs, you still see M1 rifles. They tend to be pretty accurate—and can be made more so--and more than that, they are simply fun to shoot.

But M1s are more than just mere rifles. They are a tie to the “Greatest Generation” and to those who defeated Nazism and Imperial Japan, men who stood ready to turn back Stalin, Krushev and all those that would see the world enslaved under the yoke of communism.

M1 rifles represent the peak of the American century. Because when the M1 rifle was issued to G.I.s, sailors and Marines, America was ascendant. To borrow from a popular campaign slogan these days, there was no need to make America great again. America was great. And that spark is still there. I think through the Parkerized steel and linseed-oil-impregnated walnut, there is a touchstone element to the M1 rifle, between a past we can proud of and a future we can aspire to.

When an M1 is taken one to the range today, it saddens me that there is not likely to be gray-haired man who helpfully comes over to explain how to avoid the dreaded “M1 thumb” he received when Franklin Roosevelt was president. There's no story about the first time he got it at Parris Island in 1942 or Fort Indiantown Gap in 1943.

Now, when you hear the bark of an M1 on the range followed eventually by the “ping,” remember those men. It is unlikely that a man who carried an M1 in France on June 6, 1944, or on Tarawa’s Betio Island on Nov. 20, 1943, probably won’t be there to helpfully instruct you on how the rifle should be fired properly.

About a decade ago such a gentleman, whose name he never gave beyond “Jim”—but whose face I will always remember--came over to my bench at a public range. He was sighting in his deer rifle a couple positions over, but then heard the “ping” and came over to me. I looked up and he was at my shoulder. He told me he had been a rifleman in the 115th Infantry, a replacement for man whose life was lost on D-Day. He had not shot an M1 rifle since 1945. I gladly offered up my last two eight-round en bloc clips of Lake City—all I had. And as that man that in the 70s got down behind on the bench behind my gun-show Garand, he was again a 19-year-old rifleman. It all came back to him. It is my deep regret that most young men will never understand what I saw and felt at that moment.

But there are many still with us who were issued an M1 while in uniform during the Korean War and the Cold War. And, yes, even those who served in World War II, though their numbers dwindle daily. When you take your M1 to the range, save the last clip for him. He gave you a world better than he found it, gave up part of his youth for your liberty, it is the least you can do.





GR
__________________
“...Cogito, ergo armatum sum..."

(I think, therefore I am armed.)


-- Lt. Col. Dave Grossman --
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-11-2017, 2:16 PM
Barbarosa's Avatar
Barbarosa Barbarosa is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Murrieta
Posts: 995
iTrader: 8 / 100%
Default

Thanks for posting this. Next to the "ping" the thing I like most about my Garand is I can refer to a "clip" without people going crazy.

I'll have to carry around a few extra clips after reading this.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-11-2017, 2:38 PM
FreshTapCoke FreshTapCoke is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 565
iTrader: 11 / 100%
Default

Every time I take my m1 Garand to the range and think about how heavy it is, I always remember that American soldiers marched across entire continents with them.

How amazing it must have been to watch that man shoot.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noble Cause
Can you imagine Patrick Henry, the "Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death" guy, in today's world, whining about "not joining the NRA because of junk mail" ?!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-11-2017, 3:58 PM
G-Man WC's Avatar
G-Man WC G-Man WC is offline
Kiss the Ring
CGN Contributor
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: East Bay
Posts: 10,318
iTrader: 43 / 100%
Default

Thanks for posting up OP.
One day a few summers back, I was shooting one of my Garand's at the range.
A man with what appeared to be his grandkids were walking by me down the lane in back of the benches looking to get set up.
Upon my last shot, the enbloc ejected and hit the roof.
One of the kids was quite surprised and yelled "grandpa, the gun broke!"
After they got set-up, they fired 22's for a while and grandpa walked the kids over. He was explaining to them the way the gun works and my rifle did not break and the rifle was one of the best battle rifles our country ever used.
I asked him if he'd like to shoot it. He declined saying he was shooting with the grandkid's today.
-g
__________________
If ever time should come, when vain and aspiring men shall possess the highest seats in Government, our country will stand in need of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin.
-Samuel Adams
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-11-2017, 4:03 PM
smle-man's Avatar
smle-man smle-man is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Right here
Posts: 7,436
iTrader: 111 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreshTapCoke View Post
Every time I take my m1 Garand to the range and think about how heavy it is, I always remember that American soldiers marched across entire continents with them.

How amazing it must have been to watch that man shoot.
Keep in mind that most of those WW2 Soldiers and Marines were smaller and skinnier than today's fighting men and still carried those 10 lb M1 rifles all day long.
__________________
4th generation citizen soldier - U.S. Army (ret)

"Everybody dies.. the thing is, to die well' Jack Harper
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-11-2017, 4:07 PM
aghauler's Avatar
aghauler aghauler is offline
CGN/CGSSA Contributor
CGN Contributor
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 3,656
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Garandimal View Post
M1 Garand—Save the Last Clip
by Mark Keefe - Monday, June 6, 2016


Fully 80 years after the gun called by the U.S. Army Ordnance Department the “U.S. Semi-Automatic Rifle, Caliber .30, M1” was adopted, the Garand rifle still continues to have a place with American shooters and collectors. It is a special place, one reverently reserved for not just a rifle but for a generation of Americans who did no less than save the world from Axis oppression and face down the evil of Communist aggression.

The guns are still used on the range today. The Civilian Marksmanship Program runs its Garand Match. And, when you look at the service rifle class of NRA Highpower Rifle both on range at Camp Perry and at local clubs, you still see M1 rifles. They tend to be pretty accurate—and can be made more so--and more than that, they are simply fun to shoot.

But M1s are more than just mere rifles. They are a tie to the “Greatest Generation” and to those who defeated Nazism and Imperial Japan, men who stood ready to turn back Stalin, Krushev and all those that would see the world enslaved under the yoke of communism.

M1 rifles represent the peak of the American century. Because when the M1 rifle was issued to G.I.s, sailors and Marines, America was ascendant. To borrow from a popular campaign slogan these days, there was no need to make America great again. America was great. And that spark is still there. I think through the Parkerized steel and linseed-oil-impregnated walnut, there is a touchstone element to the M1 rifle, between a past we can proud of and a future we can aspire to.

When an M1 is taken one to the range today, it saddens me that there is not likely to be gray-haired man who helpfully comes over to explain how to avoid the dreaded “M1 thumb” he received when Franklin Roosevelt was president. There's no story about the first time he got it at Parris Island in 1942 or Fort Indiantown Gap in 1943.

Now, when you hear the bark of an M1 on the range followed eventually by the “ping,” remember those men. It is unlikely that a man who carried an M1 in France on June 6, 1944, or on Tarawa’s Betio Island on Nov. 20, 1943, probably won’t be there to helpfully instruct you on how the rifle should be fired properly.

About a decade ago such a gentleman, whose name he never gave beyond “Jim”—but whose face I will always remember--came over to my bench at a public range. He was sighting in his deer rifle a couple positions over, but then heard the “ping” and came over to me. I looked up and he was at my shoulder. He told me he had been a rifleman in the 115th Infantry, a replacement for man whose life was lost on D-Day. He had not shot an M1 rifle since 1945. I gladly offered up my last two eight-round en bloc clips of Lake City—all I had. And as that man that in the 70s got down behind on the bench behind my gun-show Garand, he was again a 19-year-old rifleman. It all came back to him. It is my deep regret that most young men will never understand what I saw and felt at that moment.

But there are many still with us who were issued an M1 while in uniform during the Korean War and the Cold War. And, yes, even those who served in World War II, though their numbers dwindle daily. When you take your M1 to the range, save the last clip for him. He gave you a world better than he found it, gave up part of his youth for your liberty, it is the least you can do.


GR
Great photo and story, thanks for sharing. These are always great reminders of their sacrifices for those that came after them.

I got the same feeling when on my patient rounds I'd come across a Vet, mostly Navy or Coasties (the tattoos were a dead giveaway) but some USMC, AAAF and Army. I'd get the names of the Navy Vets ships and go back to our Dept and print out photos and ships histories for them, thank them for their service and present the documents to them during my next Treatment rounds.
It was humbling to see the looks in their eyes and hear their stories, yes they were the "17-22 year olds" again (one was 16 when he snuck into the USMC, he told me an unpleasant story about Okinawa). They told me about being torpedoed, depth charged, kamikazied, bombed, sunk and the brutality as POW's of the Japanese, a Coastie told me about serving 3 years in the 36ft open cockpit Motor Life Boats according to him, "best damn boat the coast guard ever had", that was after 4 years in the Navy and being depth charged in Subs, unique for sub duty cuz he was 6ft4in tall! I treasure those moments in my professional life when I could connect with these members of "The Greatest Generation".
Neighbors father-in-law "the Gunny" was USMC on Bougainville, Okinawa and with Chesty Puller at the Chosen.

Last edited by aghauler; 02-11-2017 at 4:10 PM.. Reason: sp
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-11-2017, 4:09 PM
Timbob55's Avatar
Timbob55 Timbob55 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicken Town, CA
Posts: 993
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Thanks for posting.
__________________
Tim Harris
CWO3 USCG (ret)

"Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword obviously never encountered automatic weapons."
Gen. Douglas MacArthur


Requiro Pax Sed Praeparo Nam Bellum
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-11-2017, 9:28 PM
Enfield47's Avatar
Enfield47 Enfield47 is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: So Cal
Posts: 5,674
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Default

Nice article, I too would be happy to let any of the greatest generation shoot my Garand.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-11-2017, 9:48 PM
userformerlyknownasfitty's Avatar
userformerlyknownasfitty userformerlyknownasfitty is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 124
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Great post OP. Fortunately, as you said there are still some out there that were issued the m1. I was in Markleys a while back. I forget the time, but Tula SKS's were on the shelf for around 400 dollars. Anyways, I was checking out the garands when an older gentleman behind the counter saw me and commented that he was issued the rifle in the early years of Vietnam. I was quite honored to speak to the man.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-11-2017, 10:07 PM
toro1's Avatar
toro1 toro1 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 443
iTrader: 6 / 100%
Default

A few years ago my Dad ask if I would take a High School buddy of his to the range with my Garand. He and my Dad had joined the army during the Korean Conflict and while my Dad became a tank driver, his buddy became a Ranger and was issued a Garand as his duty rifle. He had not handled a Garand since Korea and was thrilled to be shooting one again. Here is a pic of him at the range with the enblock airborne after firing his first 8 rounds.



When we finally left the range he was grinning ear to ear.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-11-2017, 10:08 PM
SonOfaDI's Avatar
SonOfaDI SonOfaDI is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Socal but long 2B Free
Posts: 386
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Default

Thank you for posting. As a son of one of the greatest generation, I remember, then those dang allergies kick in again.
__________________

Hillary followers and anti Trumpites: We are sorry you are in darkness now. You need to undertake the TARD protocol to become rational again.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-12-2017, 10:08 AM
smle-man's Avatar
smle-man smle-man is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Right here
Posts: 7,436
iTrader: 111 / 100%
Default

My father never saw an M1 during the war being in the USAAF, but he was very familiar with the 03 and was pleased and happy to shoot one of mine when he was in his 80s. He was a tough old guy and the recoil didn't bother him one bit.
__________________
4th generation citizen soldier - U.S. Army (ret)

"Everybody dies.. the thing is, to die well' Jack Harper
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-12-2017, 10:17 AM
Garand Hunter Garand Hunter is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 167
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Awesome rifles ! I carried mine for 10 years hunting for deer in D 5 zone in
Calaveras County some years back, handling the " too heavy " rifle every weekend 6 weekends every season '84 thru '94 until I gave it to my cousin's
son. One of my son in laws thinks he will end up with it when I cross the divide
but it going in the casket with my hide I told him.

Psalm 1
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 02-12-2017, 1:57 PM
aghauler's Avatar
aghauler aghauler is offline
CGN/CGSSA Contributor
CGN Contributor
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 3,656
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by smle-man View Post
My father never saw an M1 during the war being in the USAAF, but he was very familiar with the 03 and was pleased and happy to shoot one of mine when he was in his 80s. He was a tough old guy and the recoil didn't bother him one bit.
My late father-in-law was 9th USAAF, mechanic on P-38's, he never saw an M1 Garand. But did qualify as EXPERT (per his DD214) with the M1 carbine in Boot Camp. Never saw another one until the Battle of the Bugle when a guy came flying through their tent area in a jeep and tossed out a couple cases of M1 Carbines and a several boxes of ammo, wished them "good luck" and skedaddled! That's when they found out the Germans were 10-15 miles away and slowly closing in on them! Later that day after the weather cleared a bit and they were able to get the P-38's up and help stop the German advance.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-12-2017, 1:59 PM
aghauler's Avatar
aghauler aghauler is offline
CGN/CGSSA Contributor
CGN Contributor
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 3,656
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by toro1 View Post
A few years ago my Dad ask if I would take a High School buddy of his to the range with my Garand. He and my Dad had joined the army during the Korean Conflict and while my Dad became a tank driver, his buddy became a Ranger and was issued a Garand as his duty rifle. He had not handled a Garand since Korea and was thrilled to be shooting one again. Here is a pic of him at the range with the enblock airborne after firing his first 8 rounds.



When we finally left the range he was grinning ear to ear.
I'll bet, great photo and story!!!!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 02-12-2017, 2:50 PM
FresnoRob's Avatar
FresnoRob FresnoRob is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Fresno
Posts: 1,633
iTrader: 6 / 100%
Default

Thank you OP for posting this. We need to remember those who fought and some died so we have the rights to own such fine weapons. I'm still looking for my first Garand.
__________________
“No Kingdom can be secured otherwise than by arming the people. The possession of arms is the distinction between a freeman and a slave.”
- James Burgh
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 02-17-2017, 8:09 PM
Ron-Solo's Avatar
Ron-Solo Ron-Solo is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Ramblin' Man
Posts: 8,015
iTrader: 15 / 100%
Default

My father was an M1 instructor at Ft. Lewis and served between WWII and Korea. Many soldiers he trained went to Korea to practice their skills. He also served in Germany during the occupation. He was in Berlin during the Berlin Airlift and said he walked many miles of sentry duty carrying his M1.
__________________
LASD Retired
1978-2011

NRA Life Member
CRPA Life Member
NRA Certified Instructor

Last edited by Ron-Solo; 02-17-2017 at 8:11 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 02-18-2017, 4:12 AM
seabee1's Avatar
seabee1 seabee1 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: SoCal
Posts: 905
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

tagged for later
__________________
picks up where vetogunmageddon left off
https://www.2aforca.org/

Quote:
Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act depriving a whole nation of arms as the blackest. -Mohandas Gandhi
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 02-18-2017, 6:41 AM
SonofWWIIDI's Avatar
SonofWWIIDI SonofWWIIDI is offline
I need a LIFE!!
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Santa Clara county
Posts: 19,995
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Default

Thanks for the post OP.

Great article.
__________________
•=iii=<(
🎺

Dear autocorrect, I'm really getting tired of your shirt!
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugerDevil666 View Post
No more stupid threads. you have my word
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugerDevil666 View Post
Rule 1 I'll admit I'm a jerk when I post stupid thread.....
Quote:
Originally Posted by Helmut Shmacher View Post
I'll do the picking.. Name wise .. if you don't mind...
Helmut Shmacher- Formerly lugerdevil666
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 02-18-2017, 7:09 AM
Mac Attack's Avatar
Mac Attack Mac Attack is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,642
iTrader: 30 / 100%
Default

Thank you for posting. I was shooting my M1s in matches pretty frequently to the point that it became just another rifle. But after reading this article I am going to cherish the time I have behind their triggers and think of the men who pulled the triggers on my rifles before me.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 02-18-2017, 10:08 AM
aklon's Avatar
aklon aklon is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: San Leandro, Alameda County
Posts: 1,978
iTrader: 3 / 100%
Default

Years ago, someone here posted the following hymn to the M-1 Garand. Just like the rifle, it's a classic.

Enjoy:


So why does an M-1 Garand cost so much?

Satisfaction!

It satisfies the eyes. It looks warm, robust, serious, and capable. It looks like victory, freedom and liberation. It looks friendly. It does not look evil. It does not look delicate. It does not look cheap.

It satisfies the ears. The clocklike schnick when you pull the bolt back. The warning click as you shove home another 8 round clip. The massive, solid slam as the bolt rams another round into the chamber. The deep throated bark of the muzzle as you fire away. The final Ka-Ting as the empty clip is ejected. The horrifying scream of agony as the guy four benches down learns never to hesitate when removing his thumb from a freshly loaded clip.

It satisfies the touch. The warm sculpted wood. The curve of the stock. The curl of the bolt lug. The take-up of the trigger. The robust, solid, yet unsharp push of the kick.

It satisfies the soul. It is the defender of liberty. It is the champion of victory. It is the guarantor of freedom. It will not be used to rob banks. No terrorist will unleash it on a crowd of unarmed victims. No gangster will use it to shoot little girls while missing his imagined gangster enemies. It is the good guy's weapon. It is just the ticket to liberate a country. It opens the doors of concentration camps. It saves people from tyranny. It topples dictators. It squashes fascists. It pushes communists behind their walls. It defends the homeland. It provides for the common defense. It is necessary for the security of a free state. It brings joy to women and children as they fire it. It strikes fear in the hearts of those that oppose freedom. It makes friends at the shooting range. It reminds us of the cost of freedom. Its lavish expense is appropriately justified.

It is your duty as an American to own one. Get one now. Buy ammo. Use it. Never mind the price, find the best one you can. You have no excuse. Production lines are starting back up. The time is now.

Be careful with your thumb.
__________________
"It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the public to be the most anxious for its welfare."
- Edmund Burke
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 02-18-2017, 11:27 AM
sonofeugene's Avatar
sonofeugene sonofeugene is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,458
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Thanks for the post! It reminds me that I still want to get one. I have the actual Beretta that my father carried with him when he stormed the beaches of Southern France but I'd sure like to have a Garand, even if it isn't the one he was issued.
__________________
Let us not pray to be sheltered from dangers but to be fearless when facing them. - Rabindranath Tagore

A mind all logic is like a knife all blade. It makes the hand bleed that uses it. - Rabindranath Tagore
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 02-18-2017, 11:35 AM
Kyle1886's Avatar
Kyle1886 Kyle1886 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: N. San Diego Co.
Posts: 1,568
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Default

Wish I had my second issue M1, beautiful wood and one hell of a rifle.

How time flies.

Thanks OP...
Respectfully
Kyle
__________________
Take responsibility for your own actions!

WE are the NRA.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 02-18-2017, 11:37 AM
Blade Gunner's Avatar
Blade Gunner Blade Gunner is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,848
iTrader: 9 / 100%
Default

Still have my father's from Korea. He used to take dear with it, iron sights and all. I can't replicate that feat. It's heirloom status now with his Colt 1911.
__________________
If you find yourself in a fair fight, you're doing it all wrong.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 02-18-2017, 12:28 PM
sonofeugene's Avatar
sonofeugene sonofeugene is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,458
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

I was originally thinking of getting an M1 from CMP, but since I'm not against one that's been worked over and updated, what do folk think of Fulton Armory? And are there other options worth considering?

Thanks!
__________________
Let us not pray to be sheltered from dangers but to be fearless when facing them. - Rabindranath Tagore

A mind all logic is like a knife all blade. It makes the hand bleed that uses it. - Rabindranath Tagore
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 02-18-2017, 1:25 PM
alpha_romeo_XV's Avatar
alpha_romeo_XV alpha_romeo_XV is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: San Diego North County
Posts: 1,050
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Here's a photo from the CMP website of the D-Day commemorative Garand match at Talladega range in June 2016.

Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 02-18-2017, 9:04 PM
Enfield47's Avatar
Enfield47 Enfield47 is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: So Cal
Posts: 5,674
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sonofeugene View Post
I was originally thinking of getting an M1 from CMP, but since I'm not against one that's been worked over and updated, what do folk think of Fulton Armory? And are there other options worth considering?

Thanks!
If you don't want to wait for the CMP, I would keep an on the marketplace. They come up for sale pretty often. Nothing against Fulton Armory but you're paying through the nose for one of their Garands.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 02-18-2017, 9:27 PM
UberPatriot's Avatar
UberPatriot UberPatriot is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,838
iTrader: 73 / 100%
Default

My uncle Alton B Smith was killed in action on Iwo Jima.
Thank you for your sacrifice, R.I.P.

Smith,Alton B,Pvt,KIA,Iwo Jima,4thMarDiv,USMC
http://www.aherostribute.org/militar...eroes_S_T.html
__________________
Location: North Bay Area/Marin

NRA Member
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 02-18-2017, 10:22 PM
vmwerks's Avatar
vmwerks vmwerks is offline
Oy vey
CGN Contributor
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,321
iTrader: 85 / 100%
Default

I bought Garands for my family... best damn gun I own and ever will.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 02-18-2017, 10:32 PM
xxINKxx's Avatar
xxINKxx xxINKxx is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: OC..Moving back to AZ next year
Posts: 3,484
iTrader: 10 / 100%
Default

Scientific Garand thumb

__________________
"If a law is unjust, a man is not only right to disobey it, he is obligated to do so." - Thomas Jefferson

"I work, therefore I am."
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 02-19-2017, 10:39 AM
Mac Attack's Avatar
Mac Attack Mac Attack is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,642
iTrader: 30 / 100%
Default

That picture of the D Day match is not from CAMP Marksmanship Park in Talladega, AL. All firing points on range are on concrete and not grass. My bet is the photo is from Camp Perry. I have shot the D day match the last two years and enjoyed myself tremendously. Love my Garands.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 02-19-2017, 11:48 AM
sonofeugene's Avatar
sonofeugene sonofeugene is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,458
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by xxINKxx View Post
Scientific Garand thumb

Why would anyone want to give themselves Garand thumb over and over?
__________________
Let us not pray to be sheltered from dangers but to be fearless when facing them. - Rabindranath Tagore

A mind all logic is like a knife all blade. It makes the hand bleed that uses it. - Rabindranath Tagore
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 02-19-2017, 1:32 PM
xxINKxx's Avatar
xxINKxx xxINKxx is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: OC..Moving back to AZ next year
Posts: 3,484
iTrader: 10 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sonofeugene View Post
Why would anyone want to give themselves Garand thumb over and over?
haha. No idea.

I just found it on a website when googling "garand thumb" and the guy was demonstrating it for our viewing pleasure. Or taking one for the team to warn others.
__________________
"If a law is unjust, a man is not only right to disobey it, he is obligated to do so." - Thomas Jefferson

"I work, therefore I am."

Last edited by xxINKxx; 02-19-2017 at 1:34 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 02-19-2017, 5:43 PM
chuckdc's Avatar
chuckdc chuckdc is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Houston,TX (Formerly, Fresno,CA)
Posts: 1,824
iTrader: 3 / 100%
Default

My dad also carried one of those during WWII, but not for very long. He started off in Basic with the '03 and never saw a Garand until he got to Morocco. His training was "put that in there, the bolt closes, and you shoot". He carried that one till Kasserine Pass, where the guys around him took theirs apart and buried the trigger groups before surrendering (he was in an aid station that was surrounded). He saw them again once he came back just before the end of the war (he had escaped from a POW camp in Poland and was repatriated through the Soviet Union). When he got back, he was mustered out, and then re-enlisted not long later, where he was re-introduced to the Garand. Never carried one in action again, as he was always in specialties where he was issued the Carbine. Still, 50 years later when his mind started to go, he could still field strip a Garand.

My late brother-in-law had one in Basic before being sent to first Germany (where he had an M-14) then to Viet Nam, where he carried a Thompson.
__________________
"Mr. Rat, I have a writ here that says you are to stop eating Chen Lee's cornmeal forthwith. Now, It's a rat writ, writ for a rat, and this is lawful service of same!"
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 2:07 AM.




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Proudly hosted by GeoVario the Premier 2A host.
Calguns.net, the 'Calguns' name and all associated variants and logos are ® Trademark and © Copyright 2002-2016, Calguns.net an Incorporated Company All Rights Reserved.