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  #81  
Old 03-01-2014, 10:05 PM
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the one i have has the S and is in almost new condition. it has a small 1932 on the top . i think this one sat in a safe dry place during WW 2 because the wood and betal are just too nice. and i only paid 180 for it with 80 rounds of 1938 nazi ammo. the guy in north SD county was very kind to sell me it. he is a regulat at the PALA long range shoots . It might not be worth much but that is OK with me. it shoots like a M1 carbine chambered for a 30-6.
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  #82  
Old 03-02-2014, 5:22 PM
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Sorry if I'm doing this incorrectly, I've never posted to a forum before. I recieved a very nice 1909 when a relative passed several years back. I've been thinking of selling it lately, but I ran across a marking on it that I haven't seen discussed and was just wondering if it's common or not. It's got what I've heard refered to as a Hitler Chicken stamped on the right side of the stock. It's the same as on the 1938 ammo. Anyone see this before? Thx Scott7
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  #83  
Old 03-02-2014, 7:39 PM
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Oh I almost forgot,under that it's stamped WaA2....
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  #84  
Old 03-03-2014, 3:39 PM
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Welcome to Calguns Scott7!

Sorry to say, but the "Waffenamt" on M.95's are widely known as fakes to try and boost the value for something that's "Nazi" marked.

Read more here -

http://www.forgottenweapons.com/fake...ked-steyr-m95/
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  #85  
Old 03-03-2014, 4:56 PM
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Originally Posted by NOTABIKER View Post
the one i have has the S and is in almost new condition. it has a small 1932 on the top . i think this one sat in a safe dry place during WW 2 because the wood and betal are just too nice. and i only paid 180 for it with 80 rounds of 1938 nazi ammo. the guy in north SD county was very kind to sell me it. he is a regulat at the PALA long range shoots . It might not be worth much but that is OK with me. it shoots like a M1 carbine chambered for a 30-6.
That's a pretty good description!
As someone once told me about the Steyr M95:
It kicks like a angry mule on crack!
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  #86  
Old 03-03-2014, 5:00 PM
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Originally Posted by NOTABIKER View Post
the one i have has the S and is in almost new condition. it has a small 1932 on the top . i think this one sat in a safe dry place during WW 2 because the wood and betal are just too nice. and i only paid 180 for it with 80 rounds of 1938 nazi ammo. the guy in north SD county was very kind to sell me it. he is a regulat at the PALA long range shoots . It might not be worth much but that is OK with me. it shoots like a M1 carbine chambered for a 30-6.
Could have been refinished. Either way, I too like mine a lot. Watch out, mine hit me in the lip last time.
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  #87  
Old 03-04-2014, 9:25 PM
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Watch out, mine hit me in the lip last time.
Sling swivel..?

Seriously, who puts a sling swivel on the stock close to your cheek-weld?
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  #88  
Old 03-05-2014, 8:52 AM
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Sling swivel..?

Seriously, who puts a sling swivel on the stock close to your cheek-weld?
Apparently those crazy Austrians!

(Remember a lot of the M95 Carbines were long rifles and were shorten to carbine-lenght)
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  #89  
Old 03-06-2014, 5:59 PM
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Sling swivel..?

Seriously, who puts a sling swivel on the stock close to your cheek-weld?
my 2 Steyr M95 (Austrian) and my Budapest M95/34 (Hungarian) have sling swivel on grip just below where thumb sits on left side. so your answer is Austria,hungary(M95) and china on my T56 SKS
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  #90  
Old 03-12-2014, 5:43 PM
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Sling swivel..?

Seriously, who puts a sling swivel on the stock close to your cheek-weld?
Nah, it literally jumped up like 2 inches and went straight into my face. That damn Nazi ammo...

But I do have that sling swivel, dumbest location ever. lol
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  #91  
Old 04-09-2014, 6:49 AM
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shot mine again a couple of weeks ago. except for the stiff bolt action i just do not understand why the Germans did not press more of them into front line service. did they see service on the eastern front by Romania, Bulgaria, If so a Russian capture Steyr would be a pretty cool find.
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  #92  
Old 04-10-2014, 4:02 PM
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Frontline Romanian troops were armed primarly with VZ-24s; I don't quite remeber how much Bulgarian troops were involved on the frontline of the eastren front.
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  #93  
Old 04-25-2014, 1:24 AM
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I have a 1917 steyr stutzen and it definetly has a kick with the 8x56R.I purchased some WW2 German ammo for the clip so it would hold 5 rounds. Definetly a fun gun. However ammo is expensive. I heard several years back that the ammo was dirt cheap but I missed that band wagon. I have also researched mine and it appears mine was issued to the German SS Police. My friends think I am crazy since I am jewish but it is a piece of history and I love old firearms. Now if I could get a Nagant Revolver for 129 but I missed that band wagon as well.
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  #94  
Old 04-25-2014, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by SnipeShot View Post
I have a 1917 steyr stutzen and it definetly has a kick with the 8x56R.I purchased some WW2 German ammo for the clip so it would hold 5 rounds. Definetly a fun gun. However ammo is expensive. I heard several years back that the ammo was dirt cheap but I missed that band wagon. I have also researched mine and it appears mine was issued to the German SS Police. My friends think I am crazy since I am jewish but it is a piece of history and I love old firearms. Now if I could get a Nagant Revolver for 129 but I missed that band wagon as well.
I'm certain that your not alone when it comes to missing the boat when it come to C&R firearms - misery loves company!
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  #95  
Old 05-04-2014, 8:04 AM
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Like most of us i would like to know what year my M 95 S Steyr carbine was first made. Their is a lot of good info out their but it seems their is no way to tell. The one i have is stamped 3405M on the barrel-receiver. top of barrel marked W eagle 34. i know this is the 8-56r re chamber date not the original build date. one source says the last 2 digits of the Ser # ? . that makes no sense because that would only make it a 2 number Ser # + date ?. i guess i will just accept they made no new receivers after 1918 and move on. Does it help dating that no eagles are double stamped ? their is a STF stamped on the right side of the barrel at the wood line behind the rear sight. I have not found any mention of this mark ?

coolest darn carbine ever. our secret

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  #96  
Old 05-04-2014, 8:24 PM
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NOTABIKER: "coolest darn carbine ever. our secret"

DAMN STRAIGHT!!
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  #97  
Old 05-05-2014, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by NOTABIKER View Post
Like most of us i would like to know what year my M 95 S Steyr carbine was first made. Their is a lot of good info out their but it seems their is no way to tell. The one i have is stamped 3405M on the barrel-receiver. top of barrel marked W eagle 34. i know this is the 8-56r re chamber date not the original build date. one source says the last 2 digits of the Ser # ? . that makes no sense because that would only make it a 2 number Ser # + date ?. i guess i will just accept they made no new receivers after 1918 and move on. Does it help dating that no eagles are double stamped ? their is a STF stamped on the right side of the barrel at the wood line behind the rear sight. I have not found any mention of this mark ?

coolest darn carbine ever. our secret

If the original last two digits of date on the chamber ring has been scrubbed or stamped over to the point of being unrecognizable, there's no sure way to tell.
Besides, the date on the chamber ring is the year of that particular rifle's acceptance in to service. A rifle could have been made in say, at the end of 1916 and later accepted in 1917 and stamped as such. There is no sure way to date an M.95 by the serial either. Rifles, Stutzen and Karabiner were numbered from 0001-9999 and then a suffix block letter was added, A-Z...etc. It's anyones guess when the actual date of manufacture took place going by this, when the 9999th one was completed, staring over the serial numbers again and entered in to a new block letter. Block letters of X,Y,Z however, have all been observed on rifles which were assembled from left over war time manufactured parts, with receivers dated in the 1919-1920 time frame. It's merely a guesstimate at that point.

For instance, I have a matching, unissued, non import M.95 1918 Karabiner-Stutzen still in 8x50mmR with a serial of 20V.
And more than a few other non reworked 8x50mmR pieces with 1918 acceptance dates that are in the J and R blocks.

And THEN, you have Budapest and Steyr making them in different quantites at different times and different years where they would have rolled into a new block number, further creating a juggle between acceptance date and actual manufacture year that's hard to precisely pinpoint.

"Stf." which I recall is a post-WWI stamp, stands for "StaatsFabrik" (The State Arsenal Factory in Vienna, Austria). "Staats" meaning "State" and "Fabrik" meaning "Factory". I've seen the stamp on a few rifles but many more so on bayonets, where the StaatsFabrik reworked a number of bayonets and rifles after WWI.
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  #98  
Old 06-08-2014, 10:48 AM
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Default sling swivels for m95 long rifle

I need them...I can't find them.......HELP PLEASE!
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  #99  
Old 06-29-2014, 6:30 PM
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Last month I visited the Museum of Military History in Vienna, Austria. They have a really cool cross section of the M1895, I took a couple of photos, thought you guys might be interested in seeing them. I have a 1903 Bulgarian Contract, a Czechoslovakian refurb and an Austrian Long Rifle Myself (with a Bayo I got from Marcus von W.), great guns.

The rifle was behind glass, I tried to cut the reflection out. If anyone would like the full size photo let me know




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  #100  
Old 11-23-2014, 1:17 PM
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can someone post a picture of this 'spacer clip'? {from post #1}

"without the proper and necessary little spacer clip that keeps the bolt head from snapping back and retracting faster....."
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  #101  
Old 11-23-2014, 8:25 PM
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can someone post a picture of this 'spacer clip'? {from post #1}

"without the proper and necessary little spacer clip that keeps the bolt head from snapping back and retracting faster....."

There was no issued bolt-head hold open clip.
Unless perhaps such a tool was used in an Österreichisch-Ungarische armory but I've never seen an original one.

Check with "TheGreenMan" over at Gunboards who makes his own design. They work well.

http://forums.gunboards.com/showthre...old-open-clips





Or, you can just use the ole' dime trick for snappy bolt-heads. In which my reply in post #4 where I hinted -

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"Which ironically, can be nullified for the mere cost of a dime"
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  #102  
Old 11-23-2014, 8:55 PM
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Genius! And all this time I've been using friction... with intermittent results.
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  #103  
Old 11-23-2014, 9:07 PM
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Genius! And all this time I've been using friction... with intermittent results.


I remember one gun show many years ago I went to, I asked the seller if I could pull the bolt to do a further inspection on an original 8x50mmR M.95 KarabinerStuzen he had for sale. He told me "NO" because I would "never get the bolt back in" Being a staunch collector of the M.95 I knew the wiser and I told him I'd bet him a dime I could. He briefly looked at me funny and finally agreed but said that I would have to stay there all day until I got it back in.

Pulled the bolt, head snapped back, did my inspection, tossed in the dime and ran the bolt closed, purchased it, slung it over my shoulder, then placed the dime on the table in front of him and said have a nice day.
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  #104  
Old 12-05-2014, 11:17 PM
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Originally Posted by GOEX FFF View Post


I remember one gun show many years ago I went to, I asked the seller if I could pull the bolt to do a further inspection on an original 8x50mmR M.95 KarabinerStuzen he had for sale. He told me "NO" because I would "never get the bolt back in" Being a staunch collector of the M.95 I knew the wiser and I told him I'd bet him a dime I could. He briefly looked at me funny and finally agreed but said that I would have to stay there all day until I got it back in.

Pulled the bolt, head snapped back, did my inspection, tossed in the dime and ran the bolt closed, purchased it, slung it over my shoulder, then placed the dime on the table in front of him and said have a nice day.
Great story!
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  #105  
Old 12-24-2014, 8:53 PM
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Hey guys,

Lots of great info in this thread. I have a couple more questions for the experts. My dad has an old Steyr M95 in the back of his safe and it has no bayonet lug, is that typical for early produced rifles? Also, there are markings on the buttplate, but I have not seen any mention on any website as to what they mean, does anyone here have an idea? Finally, what is the value of a matching, non-converted, non-cut down rifle? All the ones I have seen on gun broker are 8x56R or sporterized.

Here's a bunch of pics of said rifle, the date stamp is super faded but it appears to be a "98" according to me and several other sets of eyes inspecting it.



Here is the butt plate, the plate is the smooth style with no ribs or indentations.



The date stamp



The missing bayonet lug, it is just a slip on metal band



Then the crown is all warped, but the rifling is still very strong inside the bore with no pitting.



Thanks for any info you all can offer. I think my dad got this gun from a guy way back in the day for a few bucks because he owed him money. That would be cool if it turned out to be some sort of rarity. Also, if it was in fact manufactured in 1898 it would be the oldest gun in his collection.
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  #106  
Old 12-31-2014, 7:52 PM
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Originally Posted by $P-Ritch$ View Post
Hey guys,

Lots of great info in this thread. I have a couple more questions for the experts. My dad has an old Steyr M95 in the back of his safe and it has no bayonet lug, is that typical for early produced rifles? Also, there are markings on the buttplate, but I have not seen any mention on any website as to what they mean, does anyone here have an idea? Finally, what is the value of a matching, non-converted, non-cut down rifle? All the ones I have seen on gun broker are 8x56R or sporterized.

Here's a bunch of pics of said rifle, the date stamp is super faded but it appears to be a "98" according to me and several other sets of eyes inspecting it.



Here is the butt plate, the plate is the smooth style with no ribs or indentations.



The date stamp



The missing bayonet lug, it is just a slip on metal band



Then the crown is all warped, but the rifling is still very strong inside the bore with no pitting.



Thanks for any info you all can offer. I think my dad got this gun from a guy way back in the day for a few bucks because he owed him money. That would be cool if it turned out to be some sort of rarity. Also, if it was in fact manufactured in 1898 it would be the oldest gun in his collection.

Can you post more pics of the underside of the upper band? The Long Rifle band was never produced without a lug or stacking rod, just like the Repetier-Stutzen. Only original Repetier-Karabiner (cavalry carbines) upper bands were void of the stacking rod and lug, until around the start of the war where most of the lug-less/rod-less bands were updated, literally welding or braising on a lug to the existing band and/or had their bands replaced to the stacking rod/lugged Repetier-Stutzen band.

It's especially odd you mention the top band is just a "slip on".
Is there NO screw provision at all? Even if it was an original lug-less/rod-less band from a Repetier-Karabiner, it would still have a screw that inserts from the RIGHT side (looking down the sights). If you remove the upper band, there should be a hole in the stock for a mounting screw to show that the "slip on" band isn't correct for the Long Rifle. That being said, I have no clue what type of band is shown here.

1898 is a good find for a Long Rifle that early. Note: That the date stamped on the chamber ring is the date of that rifle's acceptance. Not necessarily the actual year manufactured.
Though, with an 1898 acceptance date, you've certainly got an early one. Nice find, your Dad did good! The earliest original, unconverted and correctly matching M.95's I have in the collection are two Repetier-Stutzen with 1897 acceptance dates and two Repetier-Karabiner with 1898 and 1902 acceptance dates. I might have a couple more early Repetier-Karabiner's with rod-less and lug-less bands as well deep in the safe (I don't remember lol) but early pieces are hard to find. Also, look on the underside of the rear leaf sight and see if the serial numbers are stamped there. A number (not all) of very early M.95's had their serial numbers stamped in this location as well.




Also what is stamped on the top of Receiver? Budapest, Steyr or a Bulgarian crest? Budapest produced Long rifles and Bulgarian WWI contract pieces are another hard one to find.

The Unit stamp "42 P" on the top butt-plate would most likely be to the 42nd Pioneer Battalion (or Pionierbataillon).

As far as value, it's always hard to place a value because in general, it's worth what someone will pay for it.
But if your LR is indeed all correctly matched with that early of an acceptance date and still cambered in the M93 O-Patrone (as shown), I'd value it somewhere in the $400-$600 range, respectively.
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Old 01-04-2015, 8:31 PM
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  #108  
Old 01-04-2015, 11:30 PM
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Originally Posted by GOEX FFF View Post
Can you post more pics of the underside of the upper band? The Long Rifle band was never produced without a lug or stacking rod, just like the Repetier-Stutzen. Only original Repetier-Karabiner (cavalry carbines) upper bands were void of the stacking rod and lug, until around the start of the war where most of the lug-less/rod-less bands were updated, literally welding or braising on a lug to the existing band and/or had their bands replaced to the stacking rod/lugged Repetier-Stutzen band.

It's especially odd you mention the top band is just a "slip on".
Is there NO screw provision at all? Even if it was an original lug-less/rod-less band from a Repetier-Karabiner, it would still have a screw that inserts from the RIGHT side (looking down the sights). If you remove the upper band, there should be a hole in the stock for a mounting screw to show that the "slip on" band isn't correct for the Long Rifle. That being said, I have no clue what type of band is shown here.

1898 is a good find for a Long Rifle that early. Note: That the date stamped on the chamber ring is the date of that rifle's acceptance. Not necessarily the actual year manufactured.
Though, with an 1898 acceptance date, you've certainly got an early one. Nice find, your Dad did good! The earliest original, unconverted and correctly matching M.95's I have in the collection are two Repetier-Stutzen with 1897 acceptance dates and two Repetier-Karabiner with 1898 and 1902 acceptance dates. I might have a couple more early Repetier-Karabiner's with rod-less and lug-less bands as well deep in the safe (I don't remember lol) but early pieces are hard to find. Also, look on the underside of the rear leaf sight and see if the serial numbers are stamped there. A number (not all) of very early M.95's had their serial numbers stamped in this location as well.




Also what is stamped on the top of Receiver? Budapest, Steyr or a Bulgarian crest? Budapest produced Long rifles and Bulgarian WWI contract pieces are another hard one to find.

The Unit stamp "42 P" on the top butt-plate would most likely be to the 42nd Pioneer Battalion (or Pionierbataillon).

As far as value, it's always hard to place a value because in general, it's worth what someone will pay for it.
But if your LR is indeed all correctly matched with that early of an acceptance date and still cambered in the M93 O-Patrone (as shown), I'd value it somewhere in the $400-$600 range, respectively.
Hey Goex, no longer at my parents' place so I cannot post anymore pics. To answer your questions to the best of my knowledge:

- It is stamped "Steyr" on the receiver
- There is drill holes going through the handguard, so it is apparent something else used to be on there before this band
- The band looks like a hasty fabrication made by someone. It was welded to make a complete ring, but the weld is now broken. There is also a single hole that sort of lines up with the holes in the wood of the handguards. I was thinking it could have been intended for a set screw, but no screw has ever been present as far as I know.

Let me know if there is anything else you would like me to check out on it. I should be heading back there in a month or so.

Also, a couple more quick questions: Does anyone know where I could get a bayonet lug/band to put on this rifle to keep up its' original aesthetic? Second, would it be okay to fire it from a value perspective? I'm not worried about it from a safety perspective. The action looks practically new and there is still very strong rifling in the barrel. The one thing I noticed is the crown seems a little worn out and that could greatly affect the accuracy. I ask because my dad back when he got it, ~2005, purchased some 8x50R ammo from a hard-to-find ammo dealer in LA. It is converted from 45-70 brass. I'd heard of converting 7.62x54R, but not 45-70 and would like to see how it works. However, I would not bother if it'll hurt the value of the rifle, but I do enjoy actually using historical pieces in their intended fashion. My dad also has an original long rifle(not sporterized) Springfield 1898 that is still fairly accurate and has an action as smooth as butter, it is a hoot to shoot.
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Old 01-08-2015, 7:56 PM
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This thread is the most useful m95 info I've seen.

This was a Big5 'antique of the week' at $89, about ten years ago.
M95/34, My best guess is that it was built by Steyr 1911 or 12.

I got a front cap and removed the stacking lug, looks better.
Kept the original, just in case.









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Old 01-08-2015, 9:00 PM
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Originally Posted by $P-Ritch$ View Post
Hey Goex, no longer at my parents' place so I cannot post anymore pics. To answer your questions to the best of my knowledge:

- It is stamped "Steyr" on the receiver
- There is drill holes going through the handguard, so it is apparent something else used to be on there before this band
- The band looks like a hasty fabrication made by someone. It was welded to make a complete ring, but the weld is now broken. There is also a single hole that sort of lines up with the holes in the wood of the handguards. I was thinking it could have been intended for a set screw, but no screw has ever been present as far as I know.

Let me know if there is anything else you would like me to check out on it. I should be heading back there in a month or so.

Also, a couple more quick questions: Does anyone know where I could get a bayonet lug/band to put on this rifle to keep up its' original aesthetic? Second, would it be okay to fire it from a value perspective? I'm not worried about it from a safety perspective. The action looks practically new and there is still very strong rifling in the barrel. The one thing I noticed is the crown seems a little worn out and that could greatly affect the accuracy. I ask because my dad back when he got it, ~2005, purchased some 8x50R ammo from a hard-to-find ammo dealer in LA. It is converted from 45-70 brass. I'd heard of converting 7.62x54R, but not 45-70 and would like to see how it works. However, I would not bother if it'll hurt the value of the rifle, but I do enjoy actually using historical pieces in their intended fashion. My dad also has an original long rifle(not sporterized) Springfield 1898 that is still fairly accurate and has an action as smooth as butter, it is a hoot to shoot.
Sorry for the late reply, $P-Ritch$. Between work and taking care of my 7 month old son, things have been....busy, lol.

Yeah, I thought that band was odd. The good thing though, is a correct stacking rod / lugged band isn't too hard to find and any will do.
You might try EbaY of course. I've seen them pop up there from time to time. Just try to seek one out that has no numbers on the band.
Like we've previously mentioned in this thread, the only locations the original serial numbers should be for a correctly matching piece is the left side of the receiver and bbl, Left side of the stock and commonly, the last two digits of the serial on the left side of the top guard, right under or under near the rear leaf sight. M.95 bolts and bands were never originally serialized.

As far as shooting it...absolutely, shoot that ole' gal! I shoot my 8x50's and I see no way that that would lower the value. They're made to be shot right? Have a blast.
The Long Rifle is a joy to shoot, even in 8X56 and especially in the 8x50. I've described it as before, the Long Rifle shoots like how a luxury liner sails, hard yet elegant. Especially if you hand load and can play with your loads a bit. Mil-Surp 8x50mmR however has of course gotten scarce and can be time consuming to find but not impossible. The majority of the surplus that randomly comes to surface these days at gun shows, Gunbroker, AuctionArms...etc is mostly 1930's cupra-nickel RN Bulgarian. Expect to pay about $2+ a round.
But rolling your own definitely is the way to go if you want to have some good range time.

As for cases, I've never went the 45-70 route. I bought a bunch of 8X56mmR brass from Grafs many years ago when it was cheap.
That's what I use for 8x50 Cases. 7.62X54mmR cases of course are cheap and work great too for the 8x50R. Generally, you can just fire-form, trim and load.

In fact, the two cartridges are so close, believe it or not you can actually fire a 7.62x54mmR out of an 8x50mmR M.95, even using the same en-block clips. It's a little known fact that the Austro-Hungarians used the 54R in emergency ammunition situations for the M.95.

Would I personally do it? Eh probably not...but here's proof it can be done with no ill effects aside from lousy accuracy and the occasional sticky bolt.



One thing to note, the typical bore size of the M.95 is .329-330". During the conversion to the 8x56mmR, only the chamber was lengthened for the new cartridge, the bore diameter of .329" remained the same. The original 8x50mmR projectile was a 244 grn .323" flat base, where upon firing, the base/skirt would greatly expand and swage into the over-sized rifling.
This is why in the video, accuracy is so bad using the 54R. You're sending a .312" boat-tail bullet down a .329" diameter bore. lol But it works no less.
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Old 01-09-2015, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by GOEX FFF View Post
Sorry for the late reply, $P-Ritch$. Between work and taking care of my 7 month old son, things have been....busy, lol.

Yeah, I thought that band was odd. The good thing though, is a correct stacking rod / lugged band isn't too hard to find and any will do.
You might try EbaY of course. I've seen them pop up there from time to time. Just try to seek one out that has no numbers on the band.
Like we've previously mentioned in this thread, the only locations the original serial numbers should be for a correctly matching piece is the left side of the receiver and bbl, Left side of the stock and commonly, the last two digits of the serial on the left side of the top guard, right under or under near the rear leaf sight. M.95 bolts and bands were never originally serialized.

As far as shooting it...absolutely, shoot that ole' gal! I shoot my 8x50's and I see no way that that would lower the value. They're made to be shot right? Have a blast.
The Long Rifle is a joy to shoot, even in 8X56 and especially in the 8x50. I've described it as before, the Long Rifle shoots like how a luxury liner sails, hard yet elegant. Especially if you hand load and can play with your loads a bit. Mil-Surp 8x50mmR however has of course gotten scarce and can be time consuming to find but not impossible. The majority of the surplus that randomly comes to surface these days at gun shows, Gunbroker, AuctionArms...etc is mostly 1930's cupra-nickel RN Bulgarian. Expect to pay about $2+ a round.
But rolling your own definitely is the way to go if you want to have some good range time.

As for cases, I've never went the 45-70 route. I bought a bunch of 8X56mmR brass from Grafs many years ago when it was cheap.
That's why I use for 8X50 Cases. 7.62X54mmR cases of course are cheap and work great too for the 8x50R. Generally, you can just fire-form, trim and load.

In fact, the two cartridges are so close, believe it or not you can actually fire a 7.62x54mmR out of an 8x50mmR M.95, even using the same en-block clips. It's a little known fact that the Austro-Hungarians used the 54R in emergency ammunition situations for the M.95.

Would I personally do it? Eh probably not...but here's proof it can be done with no ill effects aside from lousy accuracy and the occasional sticky bolt.



One thing to note, the typical bore size of the M.95 is .329-330". During the conversion to the 8x56mmR, only the chamber was lengthened for the new cartridge, the bore diameter of .329" remained the same. The original 8x50mmR projectile was a 244 grn .323" flat base, where upon firing, the base/skirt would greatly expand and swage into the over-sized rifling.
This is why in the video, accuracy is so bad using the 54R. You're sending a .312" boat-tail bullet down a .329" diameter bore. lol But it works no less.
Goex, no worries on the reply time. Babies take priority over gun talk, despite what others here on calguns may say....

Thanks a bunch for the info. I will look around for the stacking rod/band. I'll try to drag my out to shoot it next time I'm home, I know he'll enjoy it. He has about 60 rounds of the 45-70 conversion which should be more than enough brass if I ever get around to reloading it. I don't expect it to be a high volume shooter.

That is awesome that they can technically feed and shoot 7.62x54R, even if it isn't that efficient. It kind of reminds me of the Japanese rifles from WWII. How they were designed with just slightly larger bores so they could shoot enemy (American) ammo in pinch, but our boys couldn't do the same.
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Old 01-20-2015, 11:18 AM
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all this info is great.
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Old 01-20-2015, 11:21 AM
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how can i know what amo mine takes it only says steyr 95 on top. like this image. my father bought this never shot it.

Last edited by mtribe; 01-20-2015 at 11:22 AM.. Reason: could not see the image
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Old 01-20-2015, 12:31 PM
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Welcome to CGN, mtribe!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtribe View Post
how can i know what amo mine takes it only says steyr 95 on top. like this image. my father bought this never shot it.
I don't see your image either.

Is there a large "S" on the chamber ring like this?



Or a large "H" like this?



Or is the chamber ring void of anything ahead of the acceptance stamps like this?



First two pics are re-chambered to 8x56mmR

Last pic (void of the "S" or "H" stamp) is an unconverted M.95 still chambered in the 8x50mmR.



Military German/Austrian Anschluss 8x56mmR -



Current commercial Serbian Prvi Partizan (PPU) production 8x56mmR -




WWI 8x50mmR -



No commercial 8x50mmR ammo is available.
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Old 02-21-2015, 6:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus von W. View Post
The Steyr M95 is an interesting firearm.


If you get it, post photos here and we will tell you more about it.
It has been years since I have joined a new forum - but I found this rifle and started searching now I am here.

The Rifle :


Markings, Bulgarian m95 - no "S" or "R" on the barrel on top of the chamber so I guess that makes it a 8mm x 50r, No info from the gun shop - but less than a hundo so good for me. Bringing it to a gun smith bud to investigate further.

other info:

side mount stock sling mounts removed, front site mounted to barrel, no bayonet lug.

Stamped over the chamber on the barrel is" Wn (looks like a crown or pineapple) 12"

Right side of barrel are a pair of pineapples, left side are matching numbers 2749c, also appearing on the stock. remove the butt plate and the stock is hollowed out.

There is an "R" appearing at the bottom of the bolt groove and the front of the trigger guard.


Ordered a lee mold and a pair of enblocs off eBay. No rush, but will eventually play with this at the range, went to an antiques arms and Armour show today - sadly, it was just NYs compliant new stuff, maybe 4 triple priced mosins and a glass statuette table, its all good thou


LOVE the gun, I see it as money well spent as I have enjoyed the research and reading of the rifle, love the old military stuff plus - it's just plain cool
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Old 02-23-2015, 2:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GOEX FFF View Post
WWI 8x50mmR -



No commercial 8x50mmR ammo is available.
That's neat... Pressburg is the German word for Bratislava, the capital of present-day slovakia. Slovak ammo!
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  #117  
Old 01-27-2016, 5:18 PM
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Just as a heads-up, there actually is 8x50R ammo currently being manufactured. It is one of about 3-4 rifle cartridges available to civilians in India. They use it in their .315" Sporting Rifles, which are basically Lee-Enfields chambered in 8x50R. According to several people over there, they use it for hunting wild boar, and just about anything else, as it is more or less all that they have access to.

-Mb
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