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Survival and Preparations Long and short term survival and 'prepping'.

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  #41  
Old 09-20-2018, 9:34 AM
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Dubious_Beans Dubious_Beans is offline
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It's apple season... so time to dry a few apples.
Core & peel them and then shove 'em through the french fry slicer.
8-10 hours in the dehydrator and they're nice and crispy.
Put them in jars and vacuum seal them and they last for years.

I like them just as a snack right out of the jar and they're also great chopped up smaller and tossed into oatmeal or malt-o-meal for my breakfast.



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  #42  
Old 09-20-2018, 1:08 PM
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I hadn't thought of doing apple fries, but I have done apple "chips" several times. I usually do granny smith because of the tartness and leave the skin on for that leathery texture. Use an apple corer, take the core out then slice horizontally as thin as you'd like. Protip for dehydrating apples: put the slices in a bowl of water (as you're slicing several apples) with about 1/4 cup of lemon juice, let them soak for 10ish minutes or until you finish your beer. The lemon juice has ascorbic acid which prevents apples from turning brown while you're slicing and dehydrating. They stay pretty much white and just look better. You can't really taste the lemon.

I've dehydrated carrots, onions, garlic, mushrooms (white button), strawberries, celery, and even anchovies. Onions and garlic can be used to make your own powders for seasoning, just be aware you need like 4-5 big onions, or 8 cloves of garlic to fill a little spice jar. Use a little food processor to powder it. It won't be tiny uniform granules, but it'll be powdered nonetheless for cooking. I think I'd like to try making my own celery powder next because celery salt is just that plus salt; a good way to over pay for salt.

Seems I recall trying blueberries which involved blanching them to break them open, then coating in lemon juice (to prevent oxidation and browning) and after 24 hours on low they were still kinda juicy so I gave up and put them all in oatmeal.

Of course, I've done jerky. I usually do the London broil cut which is just top round. "london broil" is the cooking method. Bottom round usually has a bit more marbling and dehydrating fat is a no-no. My next favorite is a "Milanesa" cut which is again top round or sirloin tip. If you go to a carneceria, or ask your butcher for this cut, its known to be prepped by them to be super thin slices of meat, its lean, usually tough, and importantly cheap. You can make what I call "dried leaves" level of jerky. I forgot about a batch and made it way too dry, I experimented and put it in the food processor to get into a fine powder as a jerky snuff like they used to sell in those little cans. It wasn't good and was just too dry.
Favorite marinades are A1 sauce, salt and ludicrous amounts of pepper, teriyaki, sriracha, and sometimes just doing a potpourri of seasonings of whatever I've got.

A coworker dehydrated habeneros and put them in a cheap pepper mill and ground them onto beef. That was the hottest jerky I've ever put in my mouth. He said that mill could only be used for habeneros. He also did the same thing for green chiles (hatch) and it was perfect for getting that green chile flavor on everything. Just have to be careful after roasting it.
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  #43  
Old 09-20-2018, 1:19 PM
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I have done apples similar to Outlaw.

I use golden delicious apples and toss in lime juice.
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  #44  
Old 09-20-2018, 1:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OutlawStar View Post
I hadn't thought of doing apple fries, but I have done apple "chips" several times. I usually do granny smith because of the tartness and leave the skin on for that leathery texture. Use an apple corer, take the core out then slice horizontally as thin as you'd like.
Last year was the first time I tried doing them "fry style".
I really like 'em that way and did most of my apples that way this year, but I do have a few trays of "chips" in the dryer now.

Quote:
Seems I recall trying blueberries which involved blanching them to break them open, then coating in lemon juice (to prevent oxidation and browning) and after 24 hours on low they were still kinda juicy so I gave up and put them all in oatmeal.
You can also freeze blueberries overnight to break them. And yes. bluebs take quite a while to dry.
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  #45  
Old 09-22-2018, 6:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dubious_Beans View Post
It's apple season... so time to dry a few apples.
Core & peel them and then shove 'em through the french fry slicer.
8-10 hours in the dehydrator and they're nice and crispy.
Put them in jars and vacuum seal them and they last for years.

I like them just as a snack right out of the jar and they're also great chopped up smaller and tossed into oatmeal or malt-o-meal for my breakfast.



That's a great idea, and would never have occurred to me. I still have about 10 #10 cans of dried apple slices from the LDS cannery, so probably wont go out and buy a bunch of apples to do this, but I do plan to put in a couple apple trees in the future so this is a great piece of knowledge to have.
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  #46  
Old 09-24-2018, 12:29 PM
Sailormilan2 Sailormilan2 is offline
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Currently marinading 5+ lbs of "London Broil" using Doc's Best Jerky recipie with Tapatia hot sauce added. About half will go into the dehydrator this evening.
Once this batch gets done I'm going to try some with jalapenos added.
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  #47  
Old 09-30-2018, 8:00 PM
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Default Chicken Jerky

I found some chicken on sale for $.89/Lb, so I bought 50 pounds, cut it into slices and made chicken jerky. 155 for 3 hours, 145 for 2 hours, then 135 for 8 hours while I slept - woke up to perfect chicken jerky. I didn't use any seasoning so it doesn't taste very appetizing, but the dogs love it and I'm sure it would be a good source of protein for a human in a pinch.
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  #48  
Old 10-09-2018, 5:24 PM
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Latest harvest from the garden. 2 trays of tomatoes (seasoned with ground dried onion & basil from a previous batch), 2 trays of chives, and 5 trays of basil.
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  #49  
Old 10-09-2018, 5:54 PM
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I've never liked the texture and bitterness of fresh tomatos, what do you do with them after drying? Are they pretty much a soup/stew ingredient?
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  #50  
Old 10-09-2018, 6:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OutlawStar View Post
I've never liked the texture and bitterness of fresh tomatos, what do you do with them after drying? Are they pretty much a soup/stew ingredient?
I HATE fresh tomatoes unless they are down to small chunks in salsa.

The dehydrated cherry tomatoes are like chips of dried tasty spaghetti sauce.
They are gooood by themselves just like a potato chip.

My wife puts them in salads, sandwiches and some soups.

I will try drying larger tomatoes when I run out of my stash.
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  #51  
Old 10-09-2018, 6:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OutlawStar View Post
I've never liked the texture and bitterness of fresh tomatos, what do you do with them after drying? Are they pretty much a soup/stew ingredient?
They are great in soups and stews, I also add them to pasta salad, Mac & Cheese, grilled cheese, Hamburger Helper, Manwich, of course spaghetti sauce, and lots of other meals. You can also grind them up in a coffee grinder and use them as seasoning - I make a tomato-basil powder that I sprinkle on zucchini slices and dehydrate into chips. My favorite is to just eat them as a snack; they're good dry, or you can put a couple drops of olive oil on them.

Barbarosa (earlier in this thread) mentioned smoking jalapenos - that gave me an idea to put jalapenos on the tomatoes. Last weekend I found a jar of Vodka marinated jalapenos and I'm planning to test an appetizer of an onion/basil seasoned dried tomato with a Vodka marinated jalapeno on top.
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  #52  
Old 10-09-2018, 6:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garv View Post
I HATE fresh tomatoes unless they are down to small chunks in salsa.

The dehydrated cherry tomatoes are like chips of dried tasty spaghetti sauce.
They are good by themselves just like a potato chip.

My wife puts them in salads, sandwiches and some soups.

I will try drying larger tomatoes when I run out of my stash.
Larger tomatoes have a different flavor - less sweet and more tomato-ish. I like to dehydrate them and grind it up into a powder to use as seasoning. It's great added to marinara sauce (if the sauce is a little runny that's a great way to thicken it up. They also go really well in a grilled cheese.

I didn't grow any this year, but 2 years ago I grew yellow pear tomatoes and dehydrated a ton of them - they had a more delicate flavor and were really good as well.

Don't forget if you make your own salsa or marinara you can dehydrate that as well and then just add water when you want to eat it. Makes it easier to store.
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  #53  
Old 10-09-2018, 7:00 PM
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Originally Posted by ChuckD View Post
Larger tomatoes have a different flavor - less sweet and more tomato-ish. I like to dehydrate them and grind it up into a powder to use as seasoning. It's great added to marinara sauce (if the sauce is a little runny that's a great way to thicken it up. They also go really well in a grilled cheese.

I didn't grow any this year, but 2 years ago I grew yellow pear tomatoes and dehydrated a ton of them - they had a more delicate flavor and were really good as well.

Don't forget if you make your own salsa or marinara you can dehydrate that as well and then just add water when you want to eat it. Makes it easier to store.
I did some last year as an experiment, 1 jar of tomato sauce dehydrated, turned out pretty good
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  #54  
Old 10-15-2018, 1:40 PM
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What grinder are you guys using to make powder out of the dried items? I have a mini cuisinart processor (about 2 cups capacity). It makes a hell of a racket, for onions it did pretty good but I just did celery last night and while there is a fine powder, it isn't able to do anything about the larger chunks. The blades are sharp, the motor spins quick, but maybe I just don't have enough celery (or whatever) in it to work properly. I only dried 1 (bundle, bulb, package) of celery which dried to about 1/3 cup of dried chunks.
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  #55  
Old 10-15-2018, 1:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OutlawStar View Post
What grinder are you guys using to make powder out of the dried items?
I use an old Magic Bullet that had a grind attachment that uses two blades instead of the usual four. It pulverizes everything.

https://www.amazon.com/Blade-Bullet-...bullet+grinder
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  #56  
Old 10-15-2018, 2:06 PM
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Originally Posted by OutlawStar View Post
What grinder are you guys using to make powder out of the dried items?
Cheap coffee grinder.

https://www.amazon.com/KRUPS-Electri.../dp/B00004SPEU
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  #57  
Old 10-15-2018, 4:26 PM
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Has anyone done fresh pienapple?
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  #58  
Old 10-15-2018, 7:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OutlawStar View Post
What grinder are you guys using to make powder out of the dried items? I have a mini cuisinart processor (about 2 cups capacity). It makes a hell of a racket, for onions it did pretty good but I just did celery last night and while there is a fine powder, it isn't able to do anything about the larger chunks. The blades are sharp, the motor spins quick, but maybe I just don't have enough celery (or whatever) in it to work properly. I only dried 1 (bundle, bulb, package) of celery which dried to about 1/3 cup of dried chunks.
I used to use the same grinder I used for my coffee, then I started saving eggshells and grinding them along with used coffee grounds (for bug controll in my garden) - so I bought a new grinder for coffee. Nothing special, I can't think of the brand, I'm sure it was the cheapest one I could find.

I have done a bunch of celery; I usually chop up the stalks into small chunks and dehydrate them for use them in soups, stews, stuffing, pasta salad, and lots of other stuff. I dehydrate the leafy tops and grind that up into celery powder. As you found, celery is mostly water, so a lot of celery becomes a very little celery when dehydrated. Smart & Final is the best place I have found for buying celery (carrots & onions too) in bulk, or if you have a garden you can grow a ton of it.
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  #59  
Old 10-15-2018, 8:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Socalman View Post
Has anyone done fresh pienapple?
I have done lots of fresh pineapple. It's simple & easy.

I slice the outside off, run it through a slicer, cut each slice into quarters, then slice the corner off those quarters to cut out the core - then lay onto the dryer sheets. I try to keep the temp as low as possible to preserve the nutrients, so I dehydrate at 115 degrees for 24 hours, if you raise the temperature then you can reduce the time. You can leave it a little chewy and its good to eat, but I usually dry it all the way and then partially re-hydrate before I eat it. You can also cut them into smaller pieces and mix with dehydrated apple, banana, and mixed nuts to make a trail mix.
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