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Survival and Preparations Long and short term survival and 'prepping'.

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  #1  
Old 01-12-2018, 9:15 AM
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Default Earthquake Top 10 List of Preps

I know there’s info scattered all over this and other forums, but I’d love to keep this simple. What are the top 5-10 items you think are critical to have AT HOME for earthquake preparedness, IN ORDER of necessity/preference? No need to discuss “quantity” as that can all be debated, but I’m more interested in what items are critical.

I’ll start under the assumption that electricity and natural gas delivery is out for a few weeks:

(1) Water - cleaned and prepared for long term storage + filter
(2) First Aid Kit - including any medications
(3) Propane - for cooking on the bbq/stove, boiling water
(4) Food - basics like beans/rice/canned/mre’s will work for a few weeks
(5) Blankets/Sleeping Bags
(6) Electricity - batteries, small solar charger, generator
(7) Cash - it’s king, and may be necessary to buy supplies
(8) Flashlights - with extra batteries or even better, rechargeable
(9) Gas - for car/motorcycle, generator, possibly other uses
(10) Tools - to help clean-up, repair, etc., including duct tape!

Okay, what am I missing? What’s your list?
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Old 01-12-2018, 9:23 AM
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A good large tent incase your structure is unsafe..

Hygiene items and a way to deal with waste

Large heavy-duty trash bags.. for trash, waste, whatever since it will pile up until services resume.

radio to keep up on news

Large sheets of plastic and other temp repair items for house damage

Also, I would have your preps in an area that seems less likely to be destroyed in an earthquake.. ours is in a out building (shed) and in the garage..

Dust masks for use during clean up..
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Old 01-12-2018, 9:35 AM
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Good Rifle and ammo to protect yourself, family and preps!!!
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Old 01-12-2018, 9:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Steve1968LS2 View Post
Hygiene items and a way to deal with waste

Large heavy-duty trash bags.. for trash, waste, whatever since it will pile up until services resume.
.
What to do with poop?
5 gal plastic buckets with trash bag liners.
Get extra toilet paper and baby wipes, too.
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Old 01-12-2018, 11:13 AM
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Working on some solar charging stations. If you can charge 18650s & USB batt. banks, i'd say you are better than most genpop.... providing that one has lighting that can be powered by them.
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Old 01-12-2018, 11:31 AM
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Pretty good summary for the basics. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 01-12-2018, 11:45 AM
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Originally Posted by ojisan View Post
What to do with poop?
5 gal plastic buckets with trash bag liners.
Get extra toilet paper and baby wipes, too.
Baby wipes are key!!!! You can use them for hygiene (soldier's shower, etc), and conserve water for drinking.

I used to send my buddies fighting in Iraq TONS of Baby wipes during the war.

Baby wipes and batteries is what they wanted....and junk food.
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Old 01-12-2018, 3:42 PM
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You might want to consider the Coleman dual fuel stoves and lanterns. They can run on Camp Gas or unleaded car gas. That might make logistics a bit simpler.
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Old 01-12-2018, 4:18 PM
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It took a while, but I was able to purchase a Coleman dual fuel stove and lantern as new condition for about $35 each on eBay. Best bucks on preps I have spent.
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Old 01-12-2018, 4:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Sailormilan2 View Post
You might want to consider the Coleman dual fuel stoves and lanterns. They can run on Camp Gas or unleaded car gas. That might make logistics a bit simpler.
Your results might be different but after 15 or so years of being a die-hard duel fuel stove and lantern guy I've switched to propane. Modern unleaded seems to eat up generators in my lanterns and make my stove finicky. Im having to change generators on my lanterns every other year at best and although I've never changed the generator on the stove my wife refuses to light it...

Further more with the price of unleaded hovering around $3 per gallon and propane I pay 1.40-2.00/ gallon I think I should be cheaper to run
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Old 01-12-2018, 6:52 PM
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I don't know this for fact or anything, but a gallon of camp fuel or unleaded seems to have a lot more energy than a gallon of propane. And there are some other fuels like naptha or denatured alcohol that will work in your lantern and probably even your stove. You can siphon from any vehicle too.

EDIT: I looked it up...

Kerosene 134,000 BTU per gallon.

Gasoline 115,000

Propane 91,600
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Old 01-12-2018, 6:54 PM
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Okay, what am I missing?
If you're bugging in, you're definitely missing fire extinguishing capability. After a big earthquake, everything burns and the fire department is nowhere near normal capacity or capability.

Gas mains ruptured by the quake start big fires traditionally, and all those people forced to cook over open flames means fires everywhere, with no realistic FD presence to respond.
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Old 01-12-2018, 7:06 PM
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How about your Family Plan? Everything is fairly straightforward if you're all at home when it happens. But does every member of your family know what to do if kids are at school (especially separate schools at different locations), Mom is 10 miles from those schools with roads/bridges out, and Dad is 40 miles away in the city? That is why a well-understood plan with contingencies is needed.
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Old 01-12-2018, 9:01 PM
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You'll be picking up plenty of broken glass from stuff that fell inside your house and possibly broken windows. Be sure to have a decent pair of leather work gloves in your earthquake stash.
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Old 01-12-2018, 9:16 PM
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See http://www2.humboldt.edu/shakyground/ and http://www.earthquakecountry.org/booklets/

This is kind of old stuff in CA ...
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Old 01-12-2018, 9:22 PM
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Originally Posted by JohnnyMtn View Post
How about your Family Plan? Everything is fairly straightforward if you're all at home when it happens. But does every member of your family know what to do if kids are at school (especially separate schools at different locations), Mom is 10 miles from those schools with roads/bridges out, and Dad is 40 miles away in the city? That is why a well-understood plan with contingencies is needed.
Bingo. But it took 13 posts before we hit the #1 missing item.

If you can't answer, right now, the following questions:

1. If you're at home, who is going to check to see if you need help?
2. If you're not at home, who do you contact for updates on the status of other family members?
3. If your home is unreachable or uninhabitable, where is your meeting place?

... then all the preps in the world may not be enough.
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:31 PM
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Bleach - multiple uses
tarp + paracord - for shelter
small shovel - to dispose of poop (away from water source)
heavy duty crow bar or similar-(may be needed to rescue folk trapped in structures.
walkie talkies (if you decide to go out and about, cell towers may be down)
6 pack of brew or similar- temp moral booster
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:41 PM
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Originally Posted by kbenson View Post
Bleach - multiple uses
tarp + paracord - for shelter
small shovel - to dispose of poop (away from water source)
heavy duty crow bar or similar-(may be needed to rescue folk trapped in structures.
walkie talkies (if you decide to go out and about, cell towers may be down)
6 pack of brew or similar- temp moral booster
The problem with bleach is it goes bad, gets weak, pretty quick... granular pool shock is better given it's shelf life and with that you can make bleach

A drone would be especially useful in an earthquake to check out area damage and conditions easily..
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve1968LS2 View Post
A good large tent incase your structure is unsafe..

Hygiene items and a way to deal with waste

Large heavy-duty trash bags.. for trash, waste, whatever since it will pile up until services resume.

radio to keep up on news

Large sheets of plastic and other temp repair items for house damage

Also, I would have your preps in an area that seems less likely to be destroyed in an earthquake.. ours is in a out building (shed) and in the garage..

Dust masks for use during clean up..
Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterb View Post
Good Rifle and ammo to protect yourself, family and preps!!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by ojisan View Post
What to do with poop?
5 gal plastic buckets with trash bag liners.
Get extra toilet paper and baby wipes, too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterb View Post
Baby wipes are key!!!! You can use them for hygiene (soldier's shower, etc), and conserve water for drinking.

I used to send my buddies fighting in Iraq TONS of Baby wipes during the war.

Baby wipes and batteries is what they wanted....and junk food.
Quote:
Originally Posted by speedrrracer View Post
If you're bugging in, you're definitely missing fire extinguishing capability. After a big earthquake, everything burns and the fire department is nowhere near normal capacity or capability.

Gas mains ruptured by the quake start big fires traditionally, and all those people forced to cook over open flames means fires everywhere, with no realistic FD presence to respond.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyMtn View Post
How about your Family Plan? Everything is fairly straightforward if you're all at home when it happens. But does every member of your family know what to do if kids are at school (especially separate schools at different locations), Mom is 10 miles from those schools with roads/bridges out, and Dad is 40 miles away in the city? That is why a well-understood plan with contingencies is needed.
All great pieces of advice! Thanks!
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:44 PM
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that's a good top 10 for somebody to start with.
but as you can see it just grows.
but the family plan needs to be in the top 10.
question is which of the top 10 can you delete to add the family plan.

the list grows.

my prep has grown so big in the past 40 years, I now have a 12ft enclosed trailer. and that's to shelter in place. I hope I have everything I need.
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Old 01-13-2018, 7:53 AM
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The problem with bleach is it goes bad, gets weak, pretty quick...
Interesting, I just read up on that and you are correct. Learn something new everyday, thank you.
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Old 01-13-2018, 2:47 PM
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Interesting, I just read up on that and you are correct. Learn something new everyday, thank you.
Yea, in some short time, like 6 months, is loses 50% or more.. rotating is a pain so pool shock power is the ticket and you can look up how to turn it into bleach..

I was surprised when I learned it as well.
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Old 01-13-2018, 3:54 PM
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Since you have propane, check if your generator is dual fuel capable so it can run on propane as well.

For the tool section, add some work gloves and maybe a large prybar.
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Old 01-13-2018, 5:43 PM
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Alum for safe water.
Alum has a forever shelf life and it is the "go to" in the third world for treating water.
In the canning or spice section at your local grocery store.
Cheap too.

Sent using a long string and 2 Dixie cups
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Old 01-14-2018, 9:29 AM
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All good comments. I think a good approach is to start with something, and keep enhancing, updating, etc over time.

Needs for water, food, shelter, waste, security, all vary greatly depending on where one is, urban, rural, home, away, alone, with kids, etc

Remember also that two is one and one is none.

Mostly, think it out, plan and constantly evolve and improve the plan, but start with something.

Interesting about alum. I will have to read up on that.

As to the coleman stove, I have multiple dual fuel appliances, and with a $20 attachment, can also use propane.

Last edited by jhillas; 01-14-2018 at 9:32 AM..
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Old 01-14-2018, 9:36 AM
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Likely overkill for your question but a great resource:

http://www.survivorlibrary.com/?page_id=1014
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Old 01-14-2018, 10:03 AM
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Go onto google maps- satellite view and locate all swimming pools within 1 mile of
1: your home
2: your office

Print out the maps with walking or bicycle directions.
Have a way to treat pool water into drinking water.


If a quake is big, I’m going to refill off pools on day 1.

It’s not possible to store enough water in an urban environment to make it a few weeks for the average family.
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Old 01-14-2018, 10:20 AM
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If a quake is big, I’m going to refill off pools on day 1.

It’s not possible to store enough water in an urban environment to make it a few weeks for the average family.
Sure it is.

Having a pool nearby is definitely a resource, but keep in mind that they can fail during a quake, or become contaminated by debris, ashes, or fuel. It's not a guaranteed supply, even if you have filtration or are conversant in field distillation techniques.

First of all you should shut off your house water supply in the event of a big shake. Your house piping, if it survives, typically holds 10-40 gallons. There are also hot water heaters and toilet tanks...

But your target is 2 gallons per person per day. Call it 120 gallons for a family of four to hold out for two weeks. This is achievable. Incidental storage plus two 55-gallon blue barrels will do the trick. Also two gallons per day allows for some error, i.e., losses, using a little of that same water for sanitation, or subsisting on dehydrated food stocks. In extreme cases 1 gallon per day is survivable, just don't plan for it.

The containers I like are these -- stackable, about at the limit of comfort to carry one and limit of reasonability to carry two, and not too stupid to bring on a long road trip or a hot weekend at the range. Just about anyone can throw a bunch of these in their closet.
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Old 01-14-2018, 10:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhillas View Post
All good comments. I think a good approach is to start with something, and keep enhancing, updating, etc over time.

Needs for water, food, shelter, waste, security, all vary greatly depending on where one is, urban, rural, home, away, alone, with kids, etc

Remember also that two is one and one is none.

Mostly, think it out, plan and constantly evolve and improve the plan, but start with something.

Interesting about alum. I will have to read up on that.

As to the coleman stove, I have multiple dual fuel appliances, and with a $20 attachment, can also use propane.
Alum (the stuff in a styptic pencil to treat razor cuts)
Processing water through flocculation and making it drinkable is not a new concept and I've been preaching it for years now.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flocculation

I can clean cuts/scrapes with alum solution too.
An easy to store/use disinfectant.
I make some concentrate in a cup of warm water and pour onto wet wipes to get really clean (sans soap).
Small amounts used won't harm streams/rivers while camping.
Safer than bleach for everyone involved won't burn skin.
Alum has no after-taste/flavor/smell.
Alum treated water will be very healthy/clean.
*Treating water with alum requires no energy. No fires or sunlight needed.
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Old 01-14-2018, 12:10 PM
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Sure it is.

Having a pool nearby is definitely a resource, but keep in mind that they can fail during a quake, or become contaminated by debris, ashes, or fuel. It's not a guaranteed supply, even if you have filtration or are conversant in field distillation techniques.

First of all you should shut off your house water supply in the event of a big shake. Your house piping, if it survives, typically holds 10-40 gallons. There are also hot water heaters and toilet tanks...

But your target is 2 gallons per person per day. Call it 120 gallons for a family of four to hold out for two weeks. This is achievable. Incidental storage plus two 55-gallon blue barrels will do the trick. Also two gallons per day allows for some error, i.e., losses, using a little of that same water for sanitation, or subsisting on dehydrated food stocks. In extreme cases 1 gallon per day is survivable, just don't plan for it.

The containers I like are these -- stackable, about at the limit of comfort to carry one and limit of reasonability to carry two, and not too stupid to bring on a long road trip or a hot weekend at the range. Just about anyone can throw a bunch of these in their closet.
Thereís a reason I (along with everyone else) have water listed as #1.

Agreed, it is possible to store enough. Itís difficult, though, which is why I think the best plan for water is multiple plans. Iíve got about 35 gallons stored in Water Bricks. Theyíre not cheap but they work really well and are easy to move around and refil if needed, unlike 55 gallon drums. Just my wife and I for now, but Iím still planning to expand that to 70 gallons soon. We also constantly have a few cases of bottled water from Costco in the garage. We try to never let that get below 2 cases. Last piece of the water puzzle for us is filtration. Iíve got a Sawyer gravity fed system as well as a few Sawyer Miniís. Oh, and a 500 pack of coffee filters to pre filter pool/pond/stream water, keeping our main filters clean for longer.

Definitely going to look into alum though.
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Old 01-14-2018, 2:22 PM
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I know there’s info scattered all over this and other forums, but I’d love to keep this simple. What are the top 5-10 items you think are critical to have AT HOME for earthquake preparedness, IN ORDER of necessity/preference? No need to discuss “quantity” as that can all be debated, but I’m more interested in what items are critical.

I’ll start under the assumption that electricity and natural gas delivery is out for a few weeks:

(1) Water - cleaned and prepared for long term storage + filter
(2) First Aid Kit - including any medications
(3) Propane - for cooking on the bbq/stove, boiling water
(4) Food - basics like beans/rice/canned/mre’s will work for a few weeks
(5) Blankets/Sleeping Bags
(6) Electricity - batteries, small solar charger, generator
(7) Cash - it’s king, and may be necessary to buy supplies
(8) Flashlights - with extra batteries or even better, rechargeable
(9) Gas - for car/motorcycle, generator, possibly other uses
(10) Tools - to help clean-up, repair, etc., including duct tape!

Okay, what am I missing? What’s your list?
1. Cat litter n bucket for the poop

2. Safety equipment mask gloves rope

3. Camp shower

4. Solar chargers

5. Walkie-talkies

6. Radio

7. Extra supplies offsite in case that you lose in a fire

8. Tarps and rope's

9. Cash n coins

10. Good boots

Have to look at my list at home
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Last edited by KrisDSA; 01-14-2018 at 2:25 PM..
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Old 01-14-2018, 9:25 PM
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The problem with bleach is it goes bad, gets weak, pretty quick... granular pool shock is better given it's shelf life and with that you can make bleach
Thanks - didn't know that. Here's some more info on Granular Calcium Hypochlorite and how to use it to purify water, disinfect, etc.

http://tacticalintelligence.net/blog...e-chlorine.htm

Last edited by WartHog; 01-14-2018 at 9:44 PM..
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Old 01-14-2018, 10:12 PM
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Allot of great advice.

Here's mine.

ref. (7) Cash - itís king, and may be necessary to buy supplies.

As part of that stash, keep $100 worth of smaller domination bills, 1's. 5's & 10's. Plus 5 or 10 Morgan / Peace silver dollar coins might come in handy in some bartering / purchasing situations.

Have a safe, sturdy OWB holster for your sidearm (semi or revolver it doesn't matter) along with mag pouches or speed loader pouches for the weapon. While you're at home, you'll be wearing it for a while. And don't forget a comfortable, well made belt to go along with your holster, etc.
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Old 01-14-2018, 11:37 PM
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I consider earthquake insurance a prep too. It's a catch-22, because if you don't have what it takes to survive short term it won't matter. But without it, you will need lots more preps, since you'll be living that way for a lot longer.
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Old 01-15-2018, 12:04 AM
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Have a fully stocked RV in the driveway
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Old 01-15-2018, 11:51 PM
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I consider earthquake insurance a prep too. It's a catch-22, because if you don't have what it takes to survive short term it won't matter. But without it, you will need lots more preps, since you'll be living that way for a lot longer.
Agreed. Iím not sold on the necessity/value of earthquake insurance, but Iíve still got it. Like most situations in life, Iím over-insured. Prepping for an earthquake is where I feel the least prepared, which is why I started this thread.
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Old 01-16-2018, 12:25 AM
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If your house flattens and everything destroyed, you wouldn't think insurance is not necessary. I point out insurance because like floods, earthquakes are often excluded from typical policies, so you have to deliberately buy it. My renter's insurance includes it, but the deductible is 6 times higher.
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Old 01-16-2018, 9:02 AM
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I've been prepping since the 70's and have had to dig into my supplies on 2 occasion, one being the 1994 Northridge earthquake where my house fell off the raised foundation. Insurance is for the property owner to help rebuild, it rarely covers contents or personal property. My agent told me the only way I could recover money from my losses was if the house burned down and the fire policy kicked in. Check the earthquake liquefaction maps in your area to determine the risk of collapse. I saw many homes built on or close to bedrock that suffered minor cracks, but many houses built on fill or on top of a high water table, were destroyed due to liquefaction.

Depending on the age and construction of your home, I would inspect and strengthen the structural integrity of your home by using steel plates to connect roof beams together and then join them to the wall studs. Do not use screws unless they're high grade stainless because they will easily snap the heads off in a large quake. At the very least your house will be the last one to collapse in a 5 minute 8.0 quake.

My primary preps include Katadyn pocket and drip water filters that last for 30-50k gallons or more. You can use any and all water sources, let the water sit for 20-30min for sediment to drop out and so you don't need to prefilter. If you use bleach make sure to give enough time for it to out gas because it will damage your kidneys and liver. Alum is my backup. With these filters you're able to move to another water supply because you're not tied down to a your storage site.

Have a large bottle of antigerm soap, store any prescription meds and other OTC meds like pain relievers, antibiotic cream, iodine, bandages and other first aid items. Another item I didn't see was the need for an early warning device or alarm to warn of unwanted people on your property. Surprise is not your friend, especially when there are groups of people who have not prepped and are desperate to feed their kids or their homies.

Communication is critical, have a few rechargeable radios so you're able to speak to other friendly folks in your hood and have a radio able to listen to shortwave broadcasts. People are going to be on edge in a protracted emergency, so the last thing you want us a friendly fire incident, especially at night.

In a situation where everyone around you is without food, water, electricity or even a stable building, anyone with resources will be a target. Lastly, I didn't see anyone mention having a garden to supplement their food supply. Remember you'll be using a lot more calories during the day, so adjust your diet accordingly.

If you're able to afford night vision or thermal, by all means get it. There is a reason that US special forces use the night to attack, this technology is a force multiplier and allows you to surprise bad guys before they know you're watching them. Obviously nobody on this thread is going hunting for bad guys, but if you can see the threat before it gets to you, that's 90% of being able to stop an attack against you or your neighbors.

Remember, your neighbors are your best resource for protection, you're all in the same boat, so they're as motivated to protect the neighborhood as you are.

Last edited by OCGunFan; 01-16-2018 at 9:18 AM..
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Old 01-16-2018, 10:02 AM
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Okay, what am I missing? Whatís your list?
How did firearms not make it on your list? We're talking about "the big one" right? If there is a need to bug-in, there's a need to plan to protect what you have.

My answers would be a bit different if this was specifically for a bug-out situation, which I think needs to be prepared for as well, but some priorities/approaches would be different.

1. Water. Clean water, regularly used/rotated, so it's fairly fresh at any given time.

2. Water filters. I have a activated carbon filter anyways for my tap water (large Brita), so I always have extra filters for that. For emergencies, I also have membrane-type filters (like lifestraw). Combined, those two methods will make a lot of unsavory water safe.

3. Not an item I "have" but something to keep in mind. If it's a true bug-in emergency, immediately try and fill your bathtub with water. Could be a lifesaver and if the water system works after the earthquake, it may be short-lived.

4. Food. If you are bugging in, most people actually have 2-3 weeks worth of food in their pantry typically anyways... and 2-3 weeks of food riding in their love handles.

5. First aid, trauma kit, prescriptions, medical manual.

6. Guns and ammo.

7. Good flashlights w/ extra batteries. A "crank" charging flashlight/phone charger.

8. HAM radio (hoping to get my license soon!)

9. Tools, including tools to pry with in case you are trapped/need leverage.

10. Blankets, clothes, hygiene products, etc, etc is taken care of, because you're at home.
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Old 01-16-2018, 10:27 AM
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You'll be picking up plenty of broken glass from stuff that fell inside your house and possibly broken windows. Be sure to have a decent pair of leather work gloves in your earthquake stash.


On a similar note, keeping some shoes under the bed beats stepping on broken glass in the dark if the earthquake is in the middle of the night.


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