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  #81  
Old 01-31-2019, 8:06 AM
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Did he not import the mags? The law does not mention disposition of the mags, just the bringing them into CA.
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  #82  
Old 02-02-2019, 10:44 AM
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Funny, as I'm on CalGuns this Saturday morning, around 10:00a heard:

Dispatcher: "... Mr Brown, out of XXXXX, clear all around ... DROS on file"

Quote:
Originally Posted by GuyFawkes View Post
Interesting.

Have you ever heard them say "CCW on file"?
I expect the agency you get the CCW from would have it on file but not sure if other police agencies also have access to that info that they could pull up quickly during ID check.
I do not recall hearing "CCW" or anything I would interpret as referring to a CCW.

The "DROS on file" calls appear to only be with the local PD, not the Sheriff's Department. I don't hear the "DROS" call often, less than I would expect considering we're in semi-rural northern California where there may be a greater proportion of the population owning firearms. And I'm guessing the mention of "DROS" refers to someone who at some point legally purchased a firearm. Maybe it means there's an active application going through the 10-day wait at the moment.

Interesting, the gals in the PD dispatch are the epitome of calm professionalism, and the "DROS" calls are seemingly always delivered very matter-of-factly, without urgency.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RickD427 View Post
Don't place too much reliance on the scanner. Nearly all routine communications between field units and dispatch are now done digitally. You'll still hear voice communications for the emergent stuff, and when the officer is away from their digital terminal.

California CCW's are entered into the state's Automated Firearms System and can be queried by LEO's in the field.

California police agencies do not directly query the state systems. Each county operates a "switch" that connects their LE agencies to the state systems. They support computer aided dispatch functions, but do so in many different ways. There is no single state standard for how such systems work. It is a very simple programming effort to cause a CAD system to query the AFS whenever a LEO runs a name check, and also to query the AFS for the name of the registered owner when a license plate is checked. Whether or not a particular county does this is determined by that capacity of their system, and by their policy-making bodies.
This is Chico where much still runs through the older analog system, so our little handheld Bearcat picks up a lot of traffic. I've heard traffic both from in-car (pursuits, in-routes, etc) and the officers' individual comms while on-foot. We can monitor Chico PD, Butte County Sheriff, both city and county FD, and ambulance channels to the local hospital, including FlightCare.

If you've heard of the recent 14-person fentynol OD (1 fatality) in Chico, I missed the initial call, but listened to the whole thing going down with Fire/EMT arriving, frantic calls for EVERY available EMT unit, multiple narcam pushes, 12 CPRs in-progress at the same time ... crazy. My wife recently retired from 20+ years in the local ER and she listened in horror during the Camp Fire as her friends and co-worker EMTs were communicating about having their ambulances burn and they huddled with their patients in whatever shelter they could find.

I also listened as increasingly tiring officers were chasing an athletic naked fence-hopper through my neighborhood.. Took a while but they finally got him.
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  #83  
Old 02-02-2019, 11:34 AM
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The police often ask, "Where are you coming from? or Where are you going?

thats another way to ask to see if you might have firearms in the vehicle

and if you say your going to the grocery store, you would be lying
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  #84  
Old 02-02-2019, 11:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by omega View Post
The police often ask, "Where are you coming from? or Where are you going?



thats another way to ask to see if you might have firearms in the vehicle



and if you say your going to the grocery store, you would be lying


What if you’re stopping on the way home? Jk


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  #85  
Old 02-02-2019, 11:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SlowDrifter View Post
on foot at the hotel with a nice gun range a few blocks away
..........
unloaded in their locked hard cases
When transporting other than within a motor vehicle, specific destination requirements apply.
Your temporary residence and the gun range are legal destinations.
Unloaded in locked cases satisfies the unloaded concealed requirements.

No violations in that situation.


Importation of the large capacity magazines was a felony wobbler (likely charged as misdemeanor in that situation, however, the judge may impose "possess no firearms" as a term of probation)
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  #86  
Old 02-04-2019, 11:53 AM
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Hmmmm.... I guess I better invest in some 10 round magazines for when visiting California with my range toys. Big help, thanks everyone!

Safe shooting and tight groups,

SD

edited to add: Thanks Cokebottle, but I kinda' resent my regular magazines being dubbed "large capacity." They're normal capacity. I'll pick up some abnormal, restricted capacity magazines for future travels to California. I'll be out there again in a couple weeks.

edited again to add: Sorry, I didn't mean any sort of insult, but y'all really shouldn't view ordinary magazines as a novelty. You should see your limited capacity magazine law as the freak show that it is. Don't novelty my normal. We good?
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Last edited by SlowDrifter; 02-04-2019 at 12:15 PM..
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  #87  
Old 02-04-2019, 2:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnk518 View Post
Highway patrol pulls you over and you tell them there are firearms in the trunk and you are going shooting.
Speeding does not give them the right to search your car, but the minute you tell him you have guns, he has a right to inspect that you are transporting them legally.

You are under no legal requirement to tell him that you have guns in the car, so why open up a can of worms by admitting to it?
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  #88  
Old 02-04-2019, 2:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SlowDrifter View Post
Sorry, I didn't mean any sort of insult, but y'all really shouldn't view ordinary magazines as a novelty. You should see your limited capacity magazine law as the freak show that it is.
One of the definitions of "novelty" is something that is unusual. In 2019 California, you are more likely to encounter 10-round mags than 10-round+ mags. Texas may still be a free state for now, but hi-caps are a novelty to the majority of handgun owners in CA.


Quote:
Originally Posted by omega View Post
and if you say your going to the grocery store, you would be lying
It's perfectly legal to lie to law enforcement if they are not interviewing you in connection to an actual crime investigation. When a local LEO asks you where you are going, or where you are coming from, they are fishing for an opportunity to discover something suspicious about you to provide probable cause. Not only do you not legally have to answer them, but you can legally lie through your teeth to them.
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Last edited by Gryff; 02-04-2019 at 2:23 PM..
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  #89  
Old 02-04-2019, 2:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SlowDrifter View Post
edited again to add: Sorry, I didn't mean any sort of insult, but y'all really shouldn't view ordinary magazines as a novelty. You should see your limited capacity magazine law as the freak show that it is. Don't novelty my normal. We good?
No insult taken. Trust me we know that mags over 10 round should not be called "large capacity" but when talking about California laws and how they affect us it's important to use the terms defined in the law to avoid confusion. "Large Capacity Magazine" is one of those terms specifically defined in our laws. Outside of a legal context I would never call a 30 round AR mag large capacity.
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  #90  
Old 02-04-2019, 2:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Gryff View Post
It's perfectly legal to lie to law enforcement if they are not interviewing you in connection to an actual crime investigation. When a local LEO asks you where you are going, or where you are coming from, they are fishing for an opportunity to discover something suspicious about you to provide probable cause. Not only do you not legally have to answer them, but you can legally lie through your teeth to them.
Not true.

In the case of a federal law enforcement officer, the making of false statement is a felony, with a penalty of five years in prison (up to eight years if the matter involves terrorism). The statute also covers the concealment of material information, even if no false statement is made. Please refer to 18 USC 1001.

The law is considerably different when state law enforcement officers are concerned. California law makes it a misdemeanor to make a false statement to a peace officer who is performing duties under the vehicle code. Please refer to Vehicle Code section 31. Also please not the absence of any statutory requirement that the false statement relate to any particular Vehicle Code section being enforced. The only requirement is that the officer be involved in the enforcement of the code. It's pretty hard to argue that an officer making a traffic stop is not performing duties under the Vehicle Code.
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  #91  
Old 02-04-2019, 3:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickD427 View Post
Not true.

In the case of a federal law enforcement officer, the making of false statement is a felony, with a penalty of five years in prison (up to eight years if the matter involves terrorism). The statute also covers the concealment of material information, even if no false statement is made. Please refer to 18 USC 1001.

The law is considerably different when state law enforcement officers are concerned. California law makes it a misdemeanor to make a false statement to a peace officer who is performing duties under the vehicle code. Please refer to Vehicle Code section 31. Also please not the absence of any statutory requirement that the false statement relate to any particular Vehicle Code section being enforced. The only requirement is that the officer be involved in the enforcement of the code. It's pretty hard to argue that an officer making a traffic stop is not performing duties under the Vehicle Code.
You may also get charged with obstruction of justice if you lie to a police officer.
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  #92  
Old 02-04-2019, 3:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gryff View Post
Speeding does not give them the right to search your car, but the minute you tell him you have guns, he has a right to inspect that you are transporting them legally.

You are under no legal requirement to tell him that you have guns in the car, so why open up a can of worms by admitting to it?
Well, I wouldn't, the point of the question was what can happen in the worst-case scenario. It was a late night quandary that sort of turned into a longer thread than I was expecting.
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  #93  
Old 02-04-2019, 8:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SlowDrifter View Post
edited to add: Thanks Cokebottle, but I kinda' resent my regular magazines being dubbed "large capacity." They're normal capacity. I'll pick up some abnormal, restricted capacity magazines for future travels to California. I'll be out there again in a couple weeks.

edited again to add: Sorry, I didn't mean any sort of insult, but y'all really shouldn't view ordinary magazines as a novelty. You should see your limited capacity magazine law as the freak show that it is. Don't novelty my normal. We good?
I was using the legal definition.
California law defines any magazine that can hold more than 10 rounds to be a "large capacity magazine"
Ya... 10 is "large capacity" for a 1911 (standard is 7), 30 is "large capacity" for an AR15 (standard is 20)

But you were asking about California law, so you got a legally correct answer... not my personal opinion
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Originally Posted by dantodd View Post
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  #94  
Old 02-06-2019, 12:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnk518 View Post
Assuming you are going shooting. Everything is in the trunk locked, and you are speeding. Highway patrol pulls you over and you tell them there are firearms in the trunk and you are going shooting.

What would happen next? Would he ask to see them for his safety? Run the serial numbers? Ask you to get out to continue the conversation?

Just curious
EXACTLY this very scenario happened to me a couple years ago. CHP pulled us over on the way to the range for speeding (I wasn't driving). There were 3 of us, so there were a LOT of guns in the back of the SUV (like 20+).

Driver told CHP officer, "We're on the way to the range, so just to let you know in case you care, we have a bunch of unloaded and locked firearms in the back."

CHP officer: "Oh ya? What range?"

Driver: "Oak Tree Gun Club"

CHP officer: "Ah yes, I've been there before, the steel gallery is fun."

*takes license & registration back to his car, returns 10 minutes later with a speeding ticket for the driver*

CHP officer: "Here's your court date (etc. etc.), please keep your speed down and have a nice day."



TL;DR - Told officer about guns, and he didn't really care.
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  #95  
Old 02-06-2019, 1:06 PM
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I'll add: I didn't have a CCW at the time of that story, but I do now. My county requires me to inform an officer that I have a CCW during a traffic stop. So essentially, I am now required to tell the officer that I have a gun in the car (which implies a loaded unlocked one that's within my reach) if I get pulled over. So this whole issue of "should I say something about guns in my car or not?" is moot for me. I don't get a choice.

I haven't been pulled over since I got my CCW, but I'd expect it to be pretty uneventful if I did, especially in my area of CA where the 2A is alive and well. At any rate, more to the point of this thread, I'd tell the officer about my CCW (and by extension, my loaded sidearm), but I wouldn't bother mentioning the other guns in my trunk unless he asks. I doubt he'd care about the trunk guns at that point, if anything he'd be more concerned about the sidearm that I'm wearing.

Last edited by cockedandglocked; 02-06-2019 at 1:09 PM..
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  #96  
Old 02-06-2019, 1:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cockedandglocked View Post
EXACTLY this very scenario happened to me a couple years ago. CHP pulled us over on the way to the range for speeding (I wasn't driving). There were 3 of us, so there were a LOT of guns in the back of the SUV (like 20+).

Driver told CHP officer, "We're on the way to the range, so just to let you know in case you care, we have a bunch of unloaded and locked firearms in the back."

CHP officer: "Oh ya? What range?"

Driver: "Oak Tree Gun Club"

CHP officer: "Ah yes, I've been there before, the steel gallery is fun."

*takes license & registration back to his car, returns 10 minutes later with a speeding ticket for the driver*

CHP officer: "Here's your court date (etc. etc.), please keep your speed down and have a nice day."



TL;DR - Told officer about guns, and he didn't really care.
We got stopped in northern Nevada by NHP on the way to a match in Idaho. Since all three of us had CCWs legal in Nevada, we were up-front with the officer about where we were going. He chatted with us about pistol preferences, warned us to keep our speed down and be careful about speeding in Oregon because their cops were dicks, and then let us go on our way.
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  #97  
Old 02-12-2019, 4:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nadodave View Post
If they're in the trunk, I wouldn't say anything to the officer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RHSth4 View Post
Exactly. Wouldn't say anything unless he asks if there are any weapons in the car.
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Originally Posted by dogtooth View Post
"But they're not in the car, they're in the trunk."
Good answer!
That's Exactly the answer I was thinking.

1. I wouldn't speak of firearms, unless asked.
2. No, I have no firearms or anything illegal IN THE CAR. Technically, you're not lying because they're in the trunk (stored legally).
3. Don't consent to search unless probable cause was given.

And lastly, drive CAREFULLY to and from the range.
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  #98  
Old 02-20-2019, 5:19 PM
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I would think it depends on the officer and how they feel (you play a big part in this). One of my close friends is a CHP officer. I’ve asked him about traffic stops that involve guns. He told me that it depends on the person and situation. If they’re “Code 4” and no “probable cause” then he would just ask them to keep their hands visible and proceed with the stop. Of course the officer would want to know where the guns are located. I’m sure if you’re calm, professional and honest then you would make the officer feel safe. That’s how you should treat all traffic stops, though. Even if it doesn’t involve guns.
This has been my experience. I got pulled over in my husband at the time's car....as soon as I saw the lights I though, OMG what if his gun is in the glove compartment or something. So I shared my concerns with the officer, he opened the GC and it wasn't in there, so I dug out the insurance and registration and everything was fine My ex had a CCW at the time, and was part-time law enforcement. So we also had confidential plates, which probably helped. He generally locked it up in the trunk still in his holster attached to his belt...then would bring it in the house with him from the trunk. But I just had a mini freak out about "what if"
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