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Survival and Preparations Long and short term survival and 'prepping'.

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  #1  
Old 08-20-2018, 6:53 PM
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Default Longest YOU have stored rice/Beans, with good results, and method?

Looking at dry canning (oven heating before dropping tops on), vacuum sealing, O2. absorbers and such.

Wondering actual tried and true methods tested by CalGunners with good results.

Please advise as to your best method tested w/out issues... HOW LONG?
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Old 08-20-2018, 7:14 PM
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Not sure I understand the question.

Dried rice/beans last FOREVER. So, exactly what is it that you are planning to can?
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Old 08-20-2018, 7:36 PM
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30 plus years and counting. We store ours in stainless steel drums with oxygen absorbents. Never had a problem. We also store lots of other food stuffs like this. We also have tons of food stuffs in #10 cans.

All plastic containers are not vermin proof. Don't do it.
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Old 08-20-2018, 7:50 PM
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Not looking to can, but store longer than 1 year if buying bulk...
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Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
30 plus years and counting. We store ours in stainless steel drums with oxygen absorbents. Never had a problem. We also store lots of other food stuffs like this. We also have tons of food stuffs in #10 cans.

All plastic containers are not vermin proof. Don't do it.
Stored rice from the store in something like this:


Brown rice was frozen for about a week before dropping it in the container.
However I doubt there is a way something got into it, as it is 1/4" acrylic with a silicone/rubber-sealed lid.
Stored about 1 ~year like this, and when needed it was opened, then closed and put away, never left open.

I understand everything has eggs that can hatch, usually at over a year, or if humidity/temp. is right for their trigger. I believe this is what happened here.

I am looking for options, tried true and tested for longer term than one year, proven via CalGunner testing... years later.

Y'all check your stores a few years later?
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Old 08-20-2018, 8:21 PM
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Originally Posted by sgt1372 View Post
Not sure I understand the question.

Dried rice/beans last FOREVER. So, exactly what is it that you are planning to can?
IIRC they lose a large amount of their nutritional value over extended periods of time. Will they keep 30 years if stored properly and kept at apx 40(f) degrees.
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Old 08-20-2018, 8:54 PM
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IIRC they lose a large amount of their nutritional value over extended periods of time. Will they keep 30 years if stored properly and kept at apx 40(f) degrees.
Nope, they lose nothing in nutritional value if kept cool and dry. 70 degrees or lower. I would be curious to know where you got your info. Go to the LDS website. The church has done a bunch of research on storing food long term and nutritional values of stored foods. My wife teaches classes on it at our Ward. The woman knows about storing anything long term.

Last edited by KevinB; 08-20-2018 at 9:03 PM..
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Old 08-20-2018, 8:58 PM
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Originally Posted by the86d View Post
Not looking to can, but store longer than 1 year if buying bulk...

Stored rice from the store in something like this:


Brown rice was frozen for about a week before dropping it in the container.
However I doubt there is a way something got into it, as it is 1/4" acrylic with a silicone/rubber-sealed lid.
Stored about 1 ~year like this, and when needed it was opened, then closed and put away, never left open.

I understand everything has eggs that can hatch, usually at over a year, or if humidity/temp. is right for their trigger. I believe this is what happened here.

I am looking for options, tried true and tested for longer term than one year, proven via CalGunner testing... years later.

Y'all check your stores a few years later?
Brown rice is tough to store longer than 1 year It goes bad. It has oil in the bran layer. Freeze it or feed it to the chickens at 1 year.
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Old 08-20-2018, 9:21 PM
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I throw an O2 absorber in the bottom of a (empty) Costco Vodka bottle, fill with rice (or beans, whatever), then seal the cap on with wax. I've never had a problem with it.

Any glass bottle will work (frosted or painted is best), I just happen to have a whole bunch of vodka bottles and they seam to seal well.

I have also used quart mason jars, but you need a lot of them and I have better uses for canning jars. Mason jars work great for vacuum sealing nuts.

I also have glass juice jars that I use for things that need a larger opening like pasta.
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Old 08-20-2018, 9:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
Nope, they lose nothing in nutritional value if kept cool and dry. 70 degrees or lower. I would be curious to know where you got your info. Go to the LDS website. The church has done a bunch of research on storing food long term and nutritional values of stored foods. My wife teaches classes on it at our Ward. The woman knows about storing anything long term.
I found my info on while earning my advanced googlefu belt...
So it is your understanding that rice and beans lose no nutritional value ever if stored cool and dry? I find that hard to believe but I am open to getting new info, it will save me having to rotate. I use mylar O2 absorbers in food grade 5 gal buckets.
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Old 08-20-2018, 9:32 PM
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I've been around rice and beans my whole life. Wash three times, plenty of vids on how to wash rice and beans and it should be done before cooking. Let them dry completely and then freeze for at least 3-4 days, this kills insect eggs that may possibly be remaining after the wash. Let it "dry" or thaw out and store it after. This is the freeze dry method.

Grains and beans are magnets to insects and rodents. Rice and other grains DO have insects whole and pieces, eggs and rodent filth on it. This is why it's important to wash rice before cooking it. It also is something I'd recommend doing before freeze drying it. Freeze drying will kill any eggs that can be in any grain. Beans need to be wash because they contain sediment and small rocks. Anything that contaminated the soil be it organic or chemical will also be floating around in beans as well as insect and rodent material. Sorting and washing beans is recommended before cooking and before freeze drying.

Rice and beans need water for cooking so of course up your water supply and even consider grinding your grains when water supplies need rationing. Freeze dried beans and grains could be kept on the shelf for years
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Old 08-20-2018, 9:44 PM
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Lots of questionable advice here.

Go here to start. https://womensconference.ce.byu.edu/...iles/52a_2.pdf

That will take you to lots of proven food storage info.

https://ndfs.byu.edu/Research/Long-Term-Food-Storage

Last edited by KevinB; 08-20-2018 at 9:48 PM..
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  #12  
Old 08-21-2018, 5:25 AM
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I have some 13 bean soup mixs from Winco's bulk supply that I oven canned about 6 years ago. I recently tried one, and they are still good.
At the same time, I have some Navy beans(little white beans) that are from my brother's Y2K stash that were just stored in their original plastic bag, but in a 5 gal container. They were unusable when I tested them. I don't know how old they were, but pushing 10 years or better.
Beans get hard, and won't soak up water when they get old.

Last edited by Sailormilan2; 08-21-2018 at 7:38 PM..
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  #13  
Old 08-21-2018, 9:52 AM
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O2 absorbers seem hit and miss
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  #14  
Old 08-21-2018, 4:56 PM
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I vacuum seal rice, beans, pasta, etc, in 2 quart mason jars and it keeps fine for at least 3 years, although I try not to let stuff sit that long. Never had any trouble with bugs in vacuum sealed jars.
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Old 08-21-2018, 5:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
Nope, they lose nothing in nutritional value if kept cool and dry. 70 degrees or lower. I would be curious to know where you got your info. Go to the LDS website. The church has done a bunch of research on storing food long term and nutritional values of stored foods. My wife teaches classes on it at our Ward. The woman knows about storing anything long term.
https://store.lds.org/lds/CategoryDi...57345616676768
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Old 08-21-2018, 5:33 PM
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Be careful where you source your grains.
I have bought Mahatma brand for years. White rice only and it's stored in the house in the original unopened 20lb bags.
Never found bugs or holes chewed in the bags. No rodents.
We eat what we store and have eaten 10+ year old white rice without problems of any kind. It's a staple for us. We store some kidney beans, but not as much. Same results with store bought beans.
Beware "bulk" grains. Source & processing unknown. I translate that to mean bugs & crap with lots of dust.
We don't can or jar/bucket the stuff. No O2 obsorbers either way.
YMMV. My mileage works & has worked for me & mine for years.
Regurgitated from the net http://www.eatbydate.com/grains/rice...piration-date/

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  #17  
Old 08-22-2018, 8:31 AM
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Be aware that the bulk sources of rice and various dried beans in bins at some stores really do come from an unknown source (at least to the consumer). It is not uncommon to find the rice has a slight coating of some sort. I have read that talcum powder is used. Be sure to wash rice from sources like that!

I have stored dried beans for many years without problems, and they are stored in a spare room in the original plastic bags.
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Old 08-22-2018, 11:15 PM
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Split peas are a great option too.
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Old 09-07-2018, 4:31 PM
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If buying from winco talk one to the employees in the bulk area. They will sell their products by the 50lb sack/case at a discount rate.

One of the reasons for the 02 absorbers is that if there are any insects or eggs in the food they will die in the absents of 02.

really old beans tend to not soften as well when cooked. A dash of baking soda remedies this Im told.
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Old 09-13-2018, 2:57 AM
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Excuse my ignorance but I am thoroughly confused as to why someone would choose rice. Not pleasing to the palate and not particularly nutritious. Perhaps someone could suggest alternatives that are equally storagable and contain some micronutrients?
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Old 09-13-2018, 7:19 AM
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Quote:
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Excuse my ignorance but I am thoroughly confused as to why someone would choose rice. Not pleasing to the palate and not particularly nutritious. Perhaps someone could suggest alternatives that are equally storagable and contain some micronutrients?
Rice is cheep, stores well, and provides a good source of carbs. Mix that with protein rich beans (also cheep and stores well)and you have the base of a diet that has sustained life for hundreds of years.
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Old 09-13-2018, 10:54 AM
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Just about anything you can digest has carbs. Perhaps someone could suggest alternatives that are equally storagable and contain some micronutrients?
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Old 09-13-2018, 2:38 PM
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There is nothing better than rice and beans for food that is easier to store long term. They are pretty close in nutritional value also.

There are lots of types of beans and it does help with keeping your food from getting boring. It won't matter a spit if you are hungry.

Again you need to be storing lots of different foods. The LDS web site has a food estimator for what you need to store and for how long.

https://providentliving.com/prepared...rage/foodcalc/

Here it is again, its a great list on what you need to store for your family.
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Old 09-14-2018, 2:27 PM
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Can you just store in gallon ziploc bags and put in 5gallon buckets? Why the mylar?
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Old 09-14-2018, 4:11 PM
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O2 can "leak" though normal plastic and degrade (oxidize) the product. The use of Mylar and O2 absorbers keeps your food in an O2 low or free environment and thus fresh much longer...like 10-30years
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Old 09-14-2018, 5:51 PM
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Remember too, the protein in beans(legumes) is not a complete protein. That is, it can't be properly utilized by the body.
In order for the body to "make" a "complete" protein, some form of grain product needs to be consumed sometime during the day.
That's why a PB&J sandwich is often considered a complete meal.
This of course assumes a lack of meat, or animal protein, sources.
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Old 09-15-2018, 8:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailormilan2 View Post
Remember too, the protein in beans(legumes) is not a complete protein. That is, it can't be properly utilized by the body.
In order for the body to "make" a "complete" protein, some form of grain product needs to be consumed sometime during the day.
That's why a PB&J sandwich is often considered a complete meal.
This of course assumes a lack of meat, or animal protein, sources.
Beans and rice is a complete protein.
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Old 09-15-2018, 12:37 PM
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Beans and rice is a complete protein.
Agreed.
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Old 09-15-2018, 4:22 PM
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I’ve done 20 lb sack jasmine rice with Mylar bag, O2 absorbers, food grade bucket with lid. Rice was packed 2010 and opened just recently. I know I could have stored it longer. Bucket was in a hallway closet. I’ve canned (mason jar) chicken meat, veggies, etc that stored several years before consumption. I’ve also dehydrated same food items and then vacuumed sealed in mason jars that lasted several years.
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Old 09-18-2018, 11:29 AM
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How does vacuum-sealed rice hold up in say large Ball/Mason jars?
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Old 09-18-2018, 12:52 PM
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Quote:
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How does vacuum-sealed rice hold up in say large Ball/Mason jars?
Just fine.
I store lots of rice in 1 or 2 quart jars.
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Old 09-18-2018, 2:01 PM
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Just fine.
I store lots of rice in 1 or 2 quart jars.
Now is the time to pick up jars on sale or closeout. 2 quart jars are coveted at my house. We use them for storage of stews, soups, anything that goes in the jar and into the fridge.

Split pea and ham for dinner tonight that the wife made last week. I'm hoping for some homemade sourdough bread with it tonight. I think I smelled fresh bread being made when I left for work this morning.
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Old 09-18-2018, 2:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
Now is the time to pick up jars on sale or closeout. 2 quart jars are coveted at my house. We use them for storage of stews, soups, anything that goes in the jar and into the fridge.

Split pea and ham for dinner tonight that the wife made last week. I'm hoping for some homemade sourdough bread with it tonight. I think I smelled fresh bread being made when I left for work this morning.
Just curious, why is now the best time to buy jars? Is there a big sale on - or were you just saying "now" is always a good time to buy more jars?

I bought a bunch of used Large Mouth Quart jars for $.50/ea recently off a local Facebook buy/sell group . . . I filled them all up and now I'm looking for more.
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Old 09-18-2018, 3:15 PM
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Quote:
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Just curious, why is now the best time to buy jars? Is there a big sale on - or were you just saying "now" is always a good time to buy more jars?

I bought a bunch of used Large Mouth Quart jars for $.50/ea recently off a local Facebook buy/sell group . . . I filled them all up and now I'm looking for more.
Summer is canning season and big box type stores are clearing out the summer seasonal stuff for Christmas stuff and the like...saw jars on clearance at both walmart and ace in the last week or so.
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Old 09-18-2018, 5:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckD View Post
Just curious, why is now the best time to buy jars? Is there a big sale on - or were you just saying "now" is always a good time to buy more jars?

I bought a bunch of used Large Mouth Quart jars for $.50/ea recently off a local Facebook buy/sell group . . . I filled them all up and now I'm looking for more.

Harvest and canning season is pretty much over. That is when the canning stuff goes on sale. If you have a Orchard close by, they are closing all the stores and goods are marked down. The Missus just got a couple hundred 2 quart jars on sale half off. She bought all the canning stuff from out local store. She also has all the local thrift stores that put aside all the mason jars for her when they come in.

She will never run out of mason jars, never. She is a jar hoarder.

At the ranch, I built her a commercial kitchen about 15 years ago. She can process anything in there. The dishwasher is big enough to fit 2 adults in it. Pots and pans big enough to cook, boil anything in.

She just got done putting up wax peppers, and I'm in heaven.

I can process beef, hogs at my place and have a walk in fridge for hanging meat. We can smoke anything.
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Old 09-20-2018, 5:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckD View Post
Just curious, why is now the best time to buy jars? Is there a big sale on - or were you just saying "now" is always a good time to buy more jars?

I bought a bunch of used Large Mouth Quart jars for $.50/ea recently off a local Facebook buy/sell group . . . I filled them all up and now I'm looking for more.
If you have a Grocery Outlet near you, check them out. Last time I was in the one near my house, jars were about $3 cheaper than other stores. But then, Grocery Outlet often sells things that are being discontinued, so yours might not have any.

If anyone is planning on making some beef jerky, FoodMaxx is currently having a sale on London Broil Max Packs for $2.77/lb. I'm going to have to get some and make a big batch again.

Last edited by Sailormilan2; 09-20-2018 at 5:52 AM..
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Old 09-20-2018, 7:43 AM
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When my mom died I went to clean out her garage. One of the things I came across was my dad's old pantry box from our camping days. Dad had died 40 years prior.

In the box I found three bags of dried pinto beans. I figured, what the heck, soaked them, cooked them and you couldn't tell the difference between those beans and fresh ones. They were delicious!
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Old 09-20-2018, 9:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Barbarosa View Post
When my mom died I went to clean out her garage. One of the things I came across was my dad's old pantry box from our camping days. Dad had died 40 years prior.

In the box I found three bags of dried pinto beans. I figured, what the heck, soaked them, cooked them and you couldn't tell the difference between those beans and fresh ones. They were delicious!
Great example of what happens when low tech is correctly applied to grain storage.
No O2 absorbing packets, no vacuum sealed mylar bags, no canning jars, no unnecessary spending.
People should run their own experiments. Some grain stored using current dogma (o2 absorbers, mylar bags (vacuum sealed), canning jars and put some quality grocery store bought grains in the original plastic bags and store them side by side for a year/years. IME pasta seems to last just as long as the white rice and beans.

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Old 09-20-2018, 2:53 PM
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3 things that ruin stored foods every time.

Moisture, Temperature, and vermin.

Vermin, bugs and mice ect ect.


All 3 can ruin your food stores.
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