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Ladies Forum A place for our female Calgunners to discuss, share and interact without the 'excess attention' sometimes found in online forums.

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  #41  
Old 05-24-2013, 2:18 PM
kidder kidder is offline
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Tactical.....smactical.....

While tactical shotguns can break birds on a trap/skeet field or sporting clays course.....they are not for those disciplines. If one want to get proficient at trap/skeet/sporting clays, buy a dedicated shotgun for those sports.
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  #42  
Old 05-24-2013, 3:23 PM
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OMG! Too tactical!
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  #43  
Old 05-27-2013, 1:38 PM
racergirl76 racergirl76 is offline
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Good advice about sending her out with a budget and let her pick. She needs to try - try - try them out. There is no substitute.

I can't recommend enough the NRA Women on Target shoot at Coon Creek in June, especially for novice shooters (or never shot a shotgun).

This clinic allowed me to come without a gun and try different stuff since they have some loaners. I was also trying to figure out what to buy, but had never shot a shotgun. The high instructor to student ratio let me have the instruction and confidence, the camaraderie of women was fun and comforting.

I learned that I hate the kick on the 870, which was on my short list (and 2 years later bought anyway for a home defense), and the $3-5k Benelli (personal gun of my instructor) didn't work for me. Normally you use the same gun all day, but by arrangement with the clinic director and my instructor, I was able to use a variety of shotguns. Trying so many guns in one day, I was able to rule in-or-out a few other guns and figure out what would be the key challenges and features in finding the right fit for me.

After several trips to multiple gun stores, I ended up with a Browning Silver because it was the right fit for ME, even though its more money than budgeted.

I'm not associated with the clinic in anyway, it's just a great womens event that gave me knowledge and confidence that I wouldn't have received at a local range day with friends.

I'm a firm believer that significant others shouldn't teach each other technical things if they value their relationship. The dynamics of teaching are changed, the lessons are tainted with personal subtexts, and the relationship risks unnecessary stress. Learning the core foundational principles from a trusted 3rd party allows the student to better focus only on the task at hand.
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  #44  
Old 05-27-2013, 5:14 PM
Asphodel Asphodel is offline
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Well, I was going to stay out of this one, considering that the questioner started with a 'requirement' of a semi-auto......

Well, nuts......nusse......er....hmmm.....como se dice 'nuts' en Espanol?

If one really prefers the 'feel' of a pump or semi-auto shotgun, well, thats a fair preference, but I'd personally recommend a best quality double gun for any 'sporting' use.

Yes, the mag capacity of a pump or semi-auto is important for hunting or self-defence......thats obvious enough.

A good double gun 'balances' differently, as it doesn't have all that weight/size of mechanism.

I still have my mother's old double gun, a British 'game gun' built in Edinburgh in the 1890's, and it still works as well as it did when it was new, tho it shows some wear in the finish. Unfortunately, those are considered 'too collectible to shoot' these days.

(One of my grandmothers had a 10 gauge Parker double and shot ducks and geese with it, also.....I think she gave it to one of her friends when she got to feeling too old to go out and shoot birds......I only just barely remember some of her stories about the huge flocks of birds in the early 1900's.......I should note that the old style 10 gauge rounds were only about as powerful as medium strong modern 12 gauge, nothing at all like the modern 3-1/2" 10 gauge mag rounds.....10ga then was like 12ga now, in other words)

I have a Winchester M97 and a 'skeet grade' Winchester M12 myself.....they are reliable, but they are seriously 'clumsy' when compared to a good double gun.

If I had to recommend a shotgun for sporting use, I'd say look for a genuine Belgian-made Browning Superposed........over-and-under, some say under-and-over, whatever.....there are modern copies made in the orient, which, well, are like blurred photographs, when compared to 'the real thing'......they may look pretty.......but.......well....

There are/were several good makers of side-by-side doubles, but most of the good ones were built back before the war......Parker, Lefever, L.C. Smith, Fox, etc. and, of course, the famous Winchester M21.

A good one of those will be 'not cheap' in today's market, but 'theres no free lunch'.......one will get what one is willing to pay for, and there is a lot of junk masquerading as guns being offered these days.......they may look 'pretty' on the outside, but there are 'weevils contained therein'......stamped or poorly fitted parts, general ill-fitting, lots of little details which make the difference between 'reliable' and 'fix it again, Tony'.

The choice of a gun is intensely personal.......one will 'just feel right', and its not easy to articulate why that is, it 'just is'. Considering a good light 20ga double for sporting use may be an excellent idea.......clay birds aren't 'hard to kill' like Canadian geese.

Stock fitting, to suit the individual person's physique, is the challenge.......a correctly fitted gun 'points instinctively', and recoil becomes minimal. If its possible to consult a gunsmith who can, and is willing to, do proper stock fitting, that really is a 'must do' part of purchasing a gun. Simply cutting a stock shorter and fitting a recoil pad is only part of that......bending a stock at the wrist or building-up or shaving-down the comb may be necessary to make a gun 'point instinctively when shouldered'.

Enough for now?

or should I have said

So endeth the sermon for today.

? ?

.... : ) ...... : )

cheers

Carla

Last edited by Asphodel; 05-27-2013 at 5:36 PM.. Reason: corrected typos
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  #45  
Old 05-28-2013, 4:47 PM
Blur125 Blur125 is offline
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But it's not tactical?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Souper View Post
OMG! Too tactical!

Last edited by Blur125; 05-28-2013 at 4:56 PM..
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  #46  
Old 05-28-2013, 4:52 PM
Blur125 Blur125 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asphodel View Post
Well, I was going to stay out of this one, considering that the questioner started with a 'requirement' of a semi-auto......

Well, nuts......nusse......er....hmmm.....como se dice 'nuts' en Espanol?

If one really prefers the 'feel' of a pump or semi-auto shotgun, well, thats a fair preference, but I'd personally recommend a best quality double gun for any 'sporting' use.

Yes, the mag capacity of a pump or semi-auto is important for hunting or self-defence......thats obvious enough.

A good double gun 'balances' differently, as it doesn't have all that weight/size of mechanism.

I still have my mother's old double gun, a British 'game gun' built in Edinburgh in the 1890's, and it still works as well as it did when it was new, tho it shows some wear in the finish. Unfortunately, those are considered 'too collectible to shoot' these days.

(One of my grandmothers had a 10 gauge Parker double and shot ducks and geese with it, also.....I think she gave it to one of her friends when she got to feeling too old to go out and shoot birds......I only just barely remember some of her stories about the huge flocks of birds in the early 1900's.......I should note that the old style 10 gauge rounds were only about as powerful as medium strong modern 12 gauge, nothing at all like the modern 3-1/2" 10 gauge mag rounds.....10ga then was like 12ga now, in other words)

I have a Winchester M97 and a 'skeet grade' Winchester M12 myself.....they are reliable, but they are seriously 'clumsy' when compared to a good double gun.

If I had to recommend a shotgun for sporting use, I'd say look for a genuine Belgian-made Browning Superposed........over-and-under, some say under-and-over, whatever.....there are modern copies made in the orient, which, well, are like blurred photographs, when compared to 'the real thing'......they may look pretty.......but.......well....

There are/were several good makers of side-by-side doubles, but most of the good ones were built back before the war......Parker, Lefever, L.C. Smith, Fox, etc. and, of course, the famous Winchester M21.

A good one of those will be 'not cheap' in today's market, but 'theres no free lunch'.......one will get what one is willing to pay for, and there is a lot of junk masquerading as guns being offered these days.......they may look 'pretty' on the outside, but there are 'weevils contained therein'......stamped or poorly fitted parts, general ill-fitting, lots of little details which make the difference between 'reliable' and 'fix it again, Tony'.

The choice of a gun is intensely personal.......one will 'just feel right', and its not easy to articulate why that is, it 'just is'. Considering a good light 20ga double for sporting use may be an excellent idea.......clay birds aren't 'hard to kill' like Canadian geese.

Stock fitting, to suit the individual person's physique, is the challenge.......a correctly fitted gun 'points instinctively', and recoil becomes minimal. If its possible to consult a gunsmith who can, and is willing to, do proper stock fitting, that really is a 'must do' part of purchasing a gun. Simply cutting a stock shorter and fitting a recoil pad is only part of that......bending a stock at the wrist or building-up or shaving-down the comb may be necessary to make a gun 'point instinctively when shouldered'.

Enough for now?

or should I have said

So endeth the sermon for today.

? ?

.... : ) ...... : )

cheers

Carla

Great story and love knowing you kept your mother's shotgun, as I hope to one day pass down my guns.

As for the semi-auto preference, it's purely for easy of use (pop a round in, push the button, you're hot) and for recoil reduction. I personally don't enjoy shooting over-unders myself, I can't shoot as long with them without a shoulder pad and I usually end up with bruises on my cheek bones. Semi-autos also allow for duck hunting and we live just over the levee near wet lands, still need to find a relative who will take us out tho...

Anywho, in the end it will be the wife's decision. If she likes the over-under idea, then that's an option. Your input was well received!
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  #47  
Old 05-28-2013, 4:55 PM
Blur125 Blur125 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by racergirl76 View Post
Good advice about sending her out with a budget and let her pick. She needs to try - try - try them out. There is no substitute.

I can't recommend enough the NRA Women on Target shoot at Coon Creek in June, especially for novice shooters (or never shot a shotgun).

This clinic allowed me to come without a gun and try different stuff since they have some loaners. I was also trying to figure out what to buy, but had never shot a shotgun. The high instructor to student ratio let me have the instruction and confidence, the camaraderie of women was fun and comforting.

I learned that I hate the kick on the 870, which was on my short list (and 2 years later bought anyway for a home defense), and the $3-5k Benelli (personal gun of my instructor) didn't work for me. Normally you use the same gun all day, but by arrangement with the clinic director and my instructor, I was able to use a variety of shotguns. Trying so many guns in one day, I was able to rule in-or-out a few other guns and figure out what would be the key challenges and features in finding the right fit for me.

After several trips to multiple gun stores, I ended up with a Browning Silver because it was the right fit for ME, even though its more money than budgeted.

I'm not associated with the clinic in anyway, it's just a great womens event that gave me knowledge and confidence that I wouldn't have received at a local range day with friends.

I'm a firm believer that significant others shouldn't teach each other technical things if they value their relationship. The dynamics of teaching are changed, the lessons are tainted with personal subtexts, and the relationship risks unnecessary stress. Learning the core foundational principles from a trusted 3rd party allows the student to better focus only on the task at hand.
Wouldn't that be something!! I will look into that, because what better way to shop than to try before you buy RIGHT?! Thanks for the tip!! And I agree, we just got her a Mini Cooper in a manual (she's never driven stick) and I let her girl-friend teach her to drive stick. Now she's off and drivingwithout an issue and saved me a TON of stress, because I love to explain the technical aspects of driving stick over "you just do this" which she prefers...
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  #48  
Old 07-10-2013, 2:56 PM
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TacticalVantage TacticalVantage is offline
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I also have trouble holding my Remington 870. I thought maybe I just needed to hit the gym to work my arm strength up! lol

-Jessica
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  #49  
Old 07-10-2013, 8:29 PM
cduff cduff is offline
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My wife is about the same size as yours. I picked-up an essentially NIB used Beretta 20GA AL391 with the 24" barrel and youth stock (in the real wood, not the newer XTRA wood, which she appreciated looks-wise) from the Cabela's Gun Library for $750. She is not very strong, however she has no trouble shooting this...actually quite good at sporting clays with it. I put the Briley Bolt Handle and EZ Bolt Release on it which makes it much easier for with her small fingers to load.

Here's something similar at Cabela's now:
http://www.cabelas.com/product/Beret...tta+al391+20ga
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  #50  
Old 07-11-2013, 3:22 PM
Blur125 Blur125 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cduff View Post
My wife is about the same size as yours. I picked-up an essentially NIB used Beretta 20GA AL391 with the 24" barrel and youth stock (in the real wood, not the newer XTRA wood, which she appreciated looks-wise) from the Cabela's Gun Library for $750. She is not very strong, however she has no trouble shooting this...actually quite good at sporting clays with it. I put the Briley Bolt Handle and EZ Bolt Release on it which makes it much easier for with her small fingers to load.

Here's something similar at Cabela's now:
http://www.cabelas.com/product/Beret...tta+al391+20ga
Great suggestion! In fact my #1 pick right now is the Beretta 3901 Target RL, which is verrry similar to the AL391, however its a 12 gauge. My lady has zero issue with 12 gauge so we're going to stick with that.
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  #51  
Old 07-11-2013, 3:31 PM
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I currently have a 391 wood youth stock for sale. It was made for a 20g but, I bought it for my 12g and it fits. It is just a bit narrower than the receiver but, it functions great. My stepson isn't a little scrawny 12 year old anymore so, I don't need it.
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  #52  
Old 07-12-2013, 1:46 PM
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Smile Shotgun for wife

Hello...

I really try to persuade men NOT to buy firearms for their girlfriends or wives (or whatever title she may have). Guns fit the individual and something a CalGuns member might recommend might not be the right choice. Take your wife to a shotgun range and let her rent various types and calibers. Please, let your lady decide for herself
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