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Old 11-14-2015, 6:09 PM
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Default FAQ: electronic hearing protection

Right now I utilize a set of custom molded ear plugs that perform fairly decently for shooting, but desire a set of electronic ear muffs to effectively assume a RSO position.

What information should should I consider when purchasing a set?
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Old 11-14-2015, 6:13 PM
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I have a pair of these:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001T7...V0YRHPRYVSE8DB
They work great and don't break the bank. I would highly recommend.
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Old 11-14-2015, 6:13 PM
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The only really important rating is NRR which is Noise Reduction rating which tells you how much total attenuation there is for sound pressure waves from outside to your ears. Best quality muffs are about 33 dB NRR but some electronics are 25 dB or less. It's actually quite important since peak sound levels at indoor ranges can approach 160 dB for magnum rounds.

I recommend using the plugs inside the electronic muffs. The speakers in my electronics are plenty loud enough to hear through inner plugs but the plugs significantly reduce hearing damage.

EDIT TO ADD:

The ones suggested in the post above mine state:

Quote:
Automatically blocks noise above 82 dB, noise reduction rating: NRR 22
NRR 22 is quite poor. These are much better at 34 dB:

http://www.amazon.com/Protection-Pro...ywords=earmuff

The statement of:

Quote:
Automatically blocks noise above 82 dB
Is quite misleading, in fact a lie. What it means is the sound levels from the inside speakers is limited to 82 dB, but they can't do anything to stop the sound that penetrates directly through the headphones and is attenuated by a relatively meager 22 dB.

As stated, pressure levels approaching 160 dB can occur with loud calibers and that means a 22dB reduction leaves the peak at 138 dB which is very dangerous.

I still recommend using internal plugs.

Last edited by bountyhunter; 11-14-2015 at 6:20 PM..
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Old 11-14-2015, 6:24 PM
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Lots of prior threads on this - search for electronic hearing protection.
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Old 11-14-2015, 6:30 PM
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I have Howard Leight Impact Sport and Impact Pro and I like them both a lot. I like a lot of hearing protection (plugs and muffs). The pro's are pretty large but have really good protection. The sport's are much more slimline, and popular, but have lower db reduction. I used the pro's exclusively until I got my Sport Ear hearing aids, Now I use the Sport's all the time.
My son uses the sports but uses roll up plugs (in half way) with them.
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Old 11-14-2015, 6:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bountyhunter View Post
The only really important rating is NRR which is Noise Reduction rating which tells you how much total attenuation there is for sound pressure waves from outside to your ears. Best quality muffs are about 33 dB NRR but some electronics are 25 dB or less. It's actually quite important since peak sound levels at indoor ranges can approach 160 dB for magnum rounds.

I recommend using the plugs inside the electronic muffs. The speakers in my electronics are plenty loud enough to hear through inner plugs but the plugs significantly reduce hearing damage.

EDIT TO ADD:

The ones suggested in the post above mine state:



NRR 22 is quite poor. These are much better at 34 dB:

http://www.amazon.com/Protection-Pro...ywords=earmuff

The statement of:



Is quite misleading, in fact a lie. What it means is the sound levels from the inside speakers is limited to 82 dB, but they can't do anything to stop the sound that penetrates directly through the headphones and is attenuated by a relatively meager 22 dB.

As stated, pressure levels approaching 160 dB can occur with loud calibers and that means a 22dB reduction leaves the peak at 138 dB which is very dangerous.

I still recommend using internal plugs.
Yeah but....but....where is the MP3 plug. It's essential to the shooting experience. If I can't listen to Taylor Swift will I'm shooting than what's the point of shooting?
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Old 11-14-2015, 6:42 PM
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All the cheap electronic ear pro has an NRR that is too low by my standards. I paid a small fortune for my Pro Ears ($250+), and I'm still happily using them 10 years later.

http://www.proears.com/Pro-Ears-Shoo...ld-Black-Muffs

Remember...you don't recover from hearing damage. The ringing may stop, but the hearing loss is permanent.
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Old 11-14-2015, 7:00 PM
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Home Depot has a Black Friday sale on electronic muffs with a 25 dB rating, radio and MP3 input for $27
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Old 11-14-2015, 7:06 PM
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People always seem to hang on NR ratings, likely because it is measurable.

However, the fit and seal of the muffs to your head is even more important. A NRR of 40 won't do you any good if the muffs aren't sealing all the way around.

If you are lucky enough that the Sport Impacts fit your head, you're well ahead of the game. What they did was size them for the "average" head and offered them with a very reasonable entry price.

I've worn a pair of MSA muffs ($300+) for years while teaching and while their NRR isn't anything to brag about, they are some of the best fitting and sealing muffs on the market. They protected much better than the Impact Sports I've been trying.

I've been seriously considering a pair of the Peltor Tactical Sport ($110) and adding a set of Gel Sealing Rings ($45). Just the gel rings cost as much as the Impact Sport muffs, but they make a huge difference in protection.

The other thing you should be aware of is if the muffs you pick "clip" or "compress" the noise about the "damage level." You want to get a pair that allows you to continue to hear voices when gunfire is in the background
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Old 11-14-2015, 7:08 PM
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Which ever ones you choose, consider ones that have one knob to control on/off/volume. And, ones that take only batteries on one side of the muffs.
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Old 11-14-2015, 7:27 PM
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tag
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Old 11-14-2015, 8:06 PM
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The big difference to me is that the cheap ones, when there is a gun shot, completely turn off. So you can't hear anything.

The expensive electronic ear pro isolate the gunshot, muffling it, but you're still able to hear whats going on around you, conversations, etc.

I've been using Pro Ears for years and I'm happy with them.

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Old 11-14-2015, 11:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sapperforward View Post
Yeah but....but....where is the MP3 plug. It's essential to the shooting experience. If I can't listen to Taylor Swift will I'm shooting than what's the point of shooting?
Muzzle blast will only damage your hearing. Taylor Swift will kill your brain.....
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Old 11-15-2015, 1:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Librarian View Post
Lots of prior threads on this - search for electronic hearing protection.
I looked at the threads, but just had more questions after going through them all, particularly the information that sometimes contradicted itself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bountyhunter View Post
The only really important rating is NRR which is Noise Reduction rating which tells you how much total attenuation there is for sound pressure waves from outside to your ears. Best quality muffs are about 33 dB NRR but some electronics are 25 dB or less. It's actually quite important since peak sound levels at indoor ranges can approach 160 dB for magnum rounds.

I recommend using the plugs inside the electronic muffs. The speakers in my electronics are plenty loud enough to hear through inner plugs but the plugs significantly reduce hearing damage.

EDIT TO ADD:

The ones suggested in the post above mine state:

NRR 22 is quite poor. These are much better at 34 dB:

http://www.amazon.com/Protection-Pro...ywords=earmuff

The statement of:

Is quite misleading, in fact a lie. What it means is the sound levels from the inside speakers is limited to 82 dB, but they can't do anything to stop the sound that penetrates directly through the headphones and is attenuated by a relatively meager 22 dB.

As stated, pressure levels approaching 160 dB can occur with loud calibers and that means a 22dB reduction leaves the peak at 138 dB which is very dangerous.

I still recommend using internal plugs.
20 years ago, I purchased a set of North Gun Muffler muffs (25 dB). I too use my custom molded ear plugs (32.8 dB) under my muffs when pistol shooting, but I just can't use them when bench shooting long arms.

However, the RSO position specifically requires the use of electronic hearing protection. Not only because of the protection afforded from gunfire, but the ability to effectively communicate with those on the range.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lumpy8 View Post
Which ever ones you choose, consider ones that have one knob to control on/off/volume. And, ones that take only batteries on one side of the muffs.
TY. That bit of information is very helpful.
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Old 11-15-2015, 6:08 AM
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I've had 5 different electronic muffs, more non-electronic muffs, and different foam insert types. The cheap electronic muff are alright. The low profile 22NRR types aren't much protection - I'd go with the beefier/bulkier ones with higher NRR. The big difference between the cheaper ones from the Ear Pro (top of the line) is that Ear Pro's don't temporarily cut out when a shot is fired. This allows you to carry on with a conversation without interruption while shots are fired. That and they have two volume knobs in case you have more hearing loss in one ear over other and need to crank one up. Are the ear pro gold worth the extra cost? I think it depends on your needs. Since you're going to RSO, I'd say it's worth it for the absence of cut out I mentioned.

Indoor ranges I ALWAYS use foam inserts plus muffs. Outdoors depends but usually both. The nice thing about the electronics is when you double up you can turn the volume up to max and still be able to hear through the foam fairly well.

BTW, I have tinnitus (ringing that never stops) from service and it's not fun - I'd rather have severe hearing loss. Protect your ears guys!

Last edited by Citizen_B; 11-15-2015 at 9:17 AM..
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Old 11-15-2015, 6:41 AM
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I use the Impact Sports with foam plugs at indoor ranges with pistols. I only use foam outdoors with rifles because I just can't get a comfortable cheek weld with muffs.
The sports are also nice for yard work with the lawn mowers, leaf blower, chainsaw, etc. since I can work and listen to Tay Tay at the same time.

If you're going to be a RSO though, I'd say it would be a good investment to buy some high end muffs. That position requires a lot more time at an indoor range than the average shooter. When I was working construction, I had no problem paying for high end work boots because I needed the proper equipment for the line of work I was in. It's a small price to pay in the long run compared to the alternative potential of permanent hearing damage. Just think of it as a one time insurance payment.
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Old 11-15-2015, 7:33 AM
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This thread is mixing up electronic hearing protection and non-electronic hearing protection info.
I am currently looking for electronic and in the market so I like to see the info.
Guess I am tired of having to take the earmuffs on and off to talk to other shooters.
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Old 11-15-2015, 8:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoaster View Post
I looked at the threads, but just had more questions after going through them all, particularly the information that sometimes contradicted itself.
Yeah, that's a complication.

I think we actually have enough info in those threads (and this one) that someone could write a pretty comprehensive FAQ out of it. Unfortunately, I don't know enough about the tech to do it myself.

Anyone want to tackle that?

A couple manufacturer's sites seem to have good info, but not readily available and of course, spins towards their own products.

For myself,I used Howard Leight's Impact Sports for a while; I found that I don't get a good seal - I wear glasses - so those were nowhere near enough. I wear the Leight NRR33 disposables under them.

Then, I upgraded to the Pro Ears Pro Mag Gold; that pro ears demo video, above, sold me. More padding around the ear cups, and they do really well outdoors. I have not taken the opportunity to try them indoors.
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Old 11-15-2015, 3:39 PM
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Originally Posted by EastCoaster View Post

However, the RSO position specifically requires the use of electronic hearing protection. Not only because of the protection afforded from gunfire, but the ability to effectively communicate with those on the range.[/B]
I understand but you can wear your plugs under the muffs and turn the volume up enough to hear very well. I have done it many times with mine.
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Old 11-15-2015, 4:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Scott View Post
This thread is mixing up electronic hearing protection and non-electronic hearing protection info.
Because they are related. You should use passive protection (plugs) inside electronic muffs for the reasons listed previously.
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Old 11-15-2015, 4:19 PM
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+1 for the Pro Ears. Your eye/safety glasses will fit comfortably under the ear seals. They're comfortable enough that you can wear them all day, even in the desert. And, the leather ear seals are easily replaceable.

I've got the Predator Gold (NRR 26) which have a smaller ear cup that allows a good cheek weld. The Pro Mag Golds that Librarian mentioned have an NRR 30 rating, but look like they have a large ear cup that wouldn't allow for easy rifle/shotgun shooting.

I made the mistake of letting my wife try them and ended up having to buy her a pair for fear of having mine "confiscated".
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Old 11-15-2015, 4:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Librarian View Post
Yeah, that's a complication.

I think we actually have enough info in those threads (and this one) that someone could write a pretty comprehensive FAQ out of it. Unfortunately, I don't know enough about the tech to do it myself.

Anyone want to tackle that?
I used to write for a living, that sounds a lot like work......

Problem is these threads always end up being like "what's the best gun" or "which caliber is better" yadda, yadda, yadda.....


And at the risk of stating the obvious: most people don't listen to the pearls of wisdom until it's too late and their hearing is shot (like mine).

Bottom line is the facts are really simple:

1) Minimize whatever sound reaches your ears when shooting. Even if you don't notice, you are spending your hearing.

2) Understand most electronics give away about 10 dB of protection compared to best passive muffs. And 10 dB can be a big deal especially indoors.

3) Use muffs and plugs when you shoot. If you have electronics, they have plenty of volume to hear "through" the plugs. Based on my experience, inner plugs add about 10 - 15 dB additional attenuation when used with muffs. The two NRR numbers do not add in series, the reasons are complicated.

Beyond that it's just pick your price point and brand that fits you. The basics don't change.
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Old 11-15-2015, 4:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HopetonBrown View Post
The big difference to me is that the cheap ones, when there is a gun shot, completely turn off. So you can't hear anything.

The expensive electronic ear pro isolate the gunshot, muffling it, but you're still able to hear whats going on around you, conversations, etc.

I've been using Pro Ears for years and I'm happy with them.

I have a set of Pro Ear Gold with a NRR of 33. They were woefully overrated and, quite frankly, dangerous. I simply could not shoot with them. Three trips back to the shop and they are now wearable outdoors. The electronics are great like in this video. But their basic function...blocking sound...wasn't so great. I've seen others complain of the same thing. But a lot of folks swear by them so it's possible there are just some bad ones out there.

My advice if you go with Pro Ears is to try on the specific set you are buying first and see what you think. And if you can't, make sure you purchase from a place where you can return them easily.

Pro Ears ultimately fixed the problem...but it took them three attempts and I did have to pressure them to pony up for shipping. I really wasn't happy about that. For a safety based product and the cost of them, there shouldn't have been any hassle with getting them corrected.

Note that most electronic muffs I've seen are rated in the low to mid 20's for NRR. That seems to be about the standard. I've got a set of Howard Leight Sport muffs too and I recall they're rated mid 20's. They cost about $50 and are great value for what they are if you're looking for a cheaper solution. I can tell you that they protect as well as my now corrected Pro Ears.

No matter what you go with, however, I would still always double up indoors. And cranking the volume up with plugs on underneath works out pretty well.
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Old 11-15-2015, 6:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoaster View Post
Right now I utilize a set of custom molded ear plugs that perform fairly decently for shooting, but desire a set of electronic ear muffs to effectively assume a RSO position.

What information should should I consider when purchasing a set?
I wore these as an RSO/OIC, line coach, shooter, etc.. fit nicely under headgear like helmets, hats, etc..

just switch the cups around so the mic's face the appropriate direction [direction range commands or shooter feedback will be coming from]

for high noise level shooting such as crew served, indoor, etc. just double up..

keep fresh batteries available in your bag - snap your fingers behind each mic for function check before approaching hot line..

six years after retiring, I still use these in my recreational shooting today



Quote:
Originally Posted by L84CABO View Post
I have a set of Pro Ear Gold with a NRR of 33. They were woefully overrated and, quite frankly, dangerous. I simply could not shoot with them. Three trips back to the shop and they are now wearable outdoors. The electronics are great like in this video. But their basic function...blocking sound...wasn't so great. I've seen others complain of the same thing. But a lot of folks swear by them so it's possible there are just some bad ones out there.

My advice if you go with Pro Ears is to try on the specific set you are buying first and see what you think. And if you can't, make sure you purchase from a place where you can return them easily.

Pro Ears ultimately fixed the problem...but it took them three attempts and I did have to pressure them to pony up for shipping. I really wasn't happy about that. For a safety based product and the cost of them, there shouldn't have been any hassle with getting them corrected.

Note that most electronic muffs I've seen are rated in the low to mid 20's for NRR. That seems to be about the standard. I've got a set of Howard Leight Sport muffs too and I recall they're rated mid 20's. They cost about $50 and are great value for what they are if you're looking for a cheaper solution. I can tell you that they protect as well as my now corrected Pro Ears.

No matter what you go with, however, I would still always double up indoors. And cranking the volume up with plugs on underneath works out pretty well.
agreed..
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Old 11-16-2015, 3:48 AM
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........Problem is these threads always end up being like "what's the best gun" or "which caliber is better" yadda, yadda, yadda..........
This.

I never understood why anyone starting a thread that asked for information about a product, turned out to largely be a debate thread about particular brands of said product.

That, or someone that thinks that the entire product isn't worth the conversation, and attempts (sometimes successfully) to change the subject of the thread.

Then I figured it out: Either most don't have any real knowledge about such, other than (maybe) a varied bit of experience with some brands; or if they do, they feel the need to have their ego stroked.

I'm not stating that those people don't have anything to contribute, but for crying out loud, at least articulate why you think that your endorsement of a brand, or your trashing of an entire product, is worth the contribution.
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Old 11-16-2015, 8:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bountyhunter View Post
I used to write for a living, that sounds a lot like work......

Problem is these threads always end up being like "what's the best gun" or "which caliber is better" yadda, yadda, yadda.....


And at the risk of stating the obvious: most people don't listen to the pearls of wisdom until it's too late and their hearing is shot (like mine).

Bottom line is the facts are really simple:

1) Minimize whatever sound reaches your ears when shooting. Even if you don't notice, you are spending your hearing.

2) Understand most electronics give away about 10 dB of protection compared to best passive muffs. And 10 dB can be a big deal especially indoors.

3) Use muffs and plugs when you shoot. If you have electronics, they have plenty of volume to hear "through" the plugs. Based on my experience, inner plugs add about 10 - 15 dB additional attenuation when used with muffs. The two NRR numbers do not add in series, the reasons are complicated.

Beyond that it's just pick your price point and brand that fits you. The basics don't change.
Well, co-op threads have worked in the past. That's how the flow charts were developed.

Let me sketch an outline of what I have absorbed. Maybe we can fill it in. (links are just kind of first-appropriate - there may be better). And maybe we can fix my mistakes ...

Loud sounds are damaging to hearing - see http://www.sengpielaudio.com/TableOf...sureLevels.htm for some info.

Both the amplitude/loudness and the frequencies in which the loudness is conveyed are important. See http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/decibel-d_59.html for one short discussion.

There are four general kinds of hearing protection devices:
1 in-ear plugs, passive
2 in-ear plugs, electronic;
3 over-the ear passive 'muffs'
4 electronic over the ear 'muffs', of several designs

There are 2 paths by which sounds can get to one's ears:
1 directly through the ear canal, which the above devices address
2 bone conduction - you'd basically need a 'space helmet' to address this path

There's a difference between sharp peaks (e.g. gunshots) and continuous noise (e.g. metal grinding). There's some overlap, but it seems equipment for one might not do so well in the other environment.

Individual perception may lead to 'doubling up' - wearing both in-ear and over the ear protection. As noted, Noise Reduction Ratings (NRR) are not additive - here's a PDF white paper from the DefendEar folks - http://www.westone.com/defendear/dow...hite_Paper.pdf

Protection 'in the field' is usually less than theoretical. See also OSHA.

'Fit' has generally two contributions associated with shooting:
1 over the ear muffs can interfere with cheek weld and wearing other headgear
2 the shape of one's head and ears affects the seal the ear muffs make over the ears. Hair, glasses, safety glasses all offer the opportunity to 'break the seal' and admit sound.

Manufacturers of quality products are genuinely interested in protecting the hearing of their customers.

They seem NOT to be interested in cross-manufacturer comparisons; that's not really surprising, but that leads to a lot of subjective comparisons - opinions, but not much data - by third parties.
http://www.guns.com/review/2013/08/2...ctronic-muffs/
http://www.bestearprotectionforshooting.com/
http://ingunowners.com/forums/ingo-r...ny-budget.html
http://www.gundogsonline.com/Article...uide-Page1.htm
http://www.earplugstore.com/earmuffs.html (more a list of what is available)
http://www.envirosafetyproducts.com/...ion-guide.html
http://peltortactical.org/the-best-i...earmuff-guide/ (really from Peltor? I dunno)

Hard to get away from sites that want to sell the things.
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Old 11-16-2015, 12:02 PM
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good references.

One thing: The "fit" issue on muffs is important but another thing most people forget: sometimes you may have to adjust your glasses or scratch an itch and that can open a gap at the seal of the muff and that's why I say the only safe setup requires using inner plugs and whatever you want to put over them.
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Old 11-16-2015, 2:17 PM
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I had the Howard Leight Sports and found their seal and comfort level lacking. I shoot USPSA and wearing crappy muffs for 7 hours is not ideal. I upgraded to 3M Peltor Tactical Sports and added on their gel rings. These combined with a pair of ESS Crossbow Suppressor glasses (flat arms) and I can shoot all day without thinking about my ears. The only issue with the gel cups is that they seal so well you end up with sweaty ears on hot days.
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Old 11-16-2015, 2:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DRoberts12345 View Post
I have Howard Leight Impact Sport and Impact Pro and I like them both a lot. I like a lot of hearing protection (plugs and muffs). The pro's are pretty large but have really good protection. The sport's are much more slimline, and popular, but have lower db reduction.
O/P, I use the Impact Sport and the Impact Pro. I use the Sport for Shotgunning and use the Pros for center fire rifle and pistol range use and RSO duties.

The Pros are about $70.00 and well worth it. They will work for your use.

Take a look at them : http://www.amazon.com/Honeywell-R-01...14AYWQD14MZE3B

**EDIT** Also take into consideration battery replacement. Some of the ones being recommended are a pain in the *** to changeout batteries, you have to remove the ear cups and the batteries are inside the ear housing . The Sport Pro batteries are easy to replace.

Last edited by FLIGHT762; 11-16-2015 at 3:05 PM..
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Old 11-16-2015, 2:46 PM
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I have the Impact Sports, but they never really fit right, I hated them.

I just picked up the Peltor Tacticals, and the difference is night and day.

I honestly don't see how people recommend the Impacts.
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Old 11-16-2015, 3:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hermosabeach View Post
Home Depot has a Black Friday sale on electronic muffs with a 25 dB rating, radio and MP3 input for $27
Do you have a link to that?
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Old 11-16-2015, 3:25 PM
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This guy has useful information specific to a few of the popular models.
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Old 11-16-2015, 3:39 PM
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After narrowing it down, I have chosen two electronic noise reducing devices to consider.

The decision was made primarily of effectiveness, both with a NRR of 30. Many more expensive units had a less effective NRR.

Howard Leight Electronic Impact Pro Hearing Protection Earmuff $62.59

Pro-Ears Pro 300 w/ Pro Mag Earmuffs $99.99
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Old 11-16-2015, 9:50 PM
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Message Jesse Tischauser on Facebook or IG for a 10% off OpticsPlanet coupon code.
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Old 11-16-2015, 11:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoaster View Post
After narrowing it down, I have chosen two electronic noise reducing devices to consider.

The decision was made primarily of effectiveness, both with a NRR of 30. Many more expensive units had a less effective NRR.

Howard Leight Electronic Impact Pro Hearing Protection Earmuff $62.59

Pro-Ears Pro 300 w/ Pro Mag Earmuffs $99.99
Having owned both, either of those would be good choices. I might lean slightly towards the Pro Ears at that price difference.

One thing about having electronic muffs on for a whole day is battery power. They last quite awhile (multiple days) but it's inconvenient if they die mid-day and need a battery swap. I like to use rechargeables and have them topped off before the day or every couple of days. The Howard Leights use AAA but the Ear Pros uses N type so that's another thing to consider.
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Old 11-16-2015, 11:53 PM
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I use these . . http://www.leadmask.com/howard-leigh...FVGCfgody0AEVw

I enjoy the sound of walking on gravel with them on

Last edited by Walky Talky; 11-16-2015 at 11:55 PM..
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Old 11-17-2015, 5:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walky Talky View Post
I use these . . http://www.leadmask.com/howard-leigh...FVGCfgody0AEVw

I enjoy the sound of walking on gravel with them on
I would have liked to have a low profile set such as these, but with a NRR of 22, it just wasn't effective enough for my purposes.
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Old 11-17-2015, 5:46 AM
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Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation

A Shot of Prevention: CAOHC Webinar 2014 Handout

Peak dB SPL of Various Firearms (5 Studies), Supplemental Handout
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Old 11-17-2015, 5:53 AM
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I wear these with plugs in.

http://www.amazon.com/3M-Tactical-El...WGDTX3TX55G53G

Does anyone have recommendations for eye protection that doesn't compromise muff seal?

Looking at these after pointerman's mention of them.

http://www.amazon.com/ESS-Eyewear-Cr.../dp/B004D60S86

Last edited by Eddbot; 11-17-2015 at 6:02 AM..
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Old 11-17-2015, 9:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoaster View Post
Informative links, thanks for sharing. I'm a little surprised at the pistol data though. It's a compilation from multiple sources and taken from different recording positions, so it's tough to make a direct comparison looking at that table.

One set that doesn't look right to me is it's claiming the G22 (40SW) is the same dB as a 45ACP, and even less than the G17 (9mm). This hasn't been my experience at all. With my uncalibrated ears using passive muffs, 40SW is slightly louder than 9mm, with 45ACP considerably softer than both.

This source has slightly different numbers:

http://www.freehearingtest.com/hia_gunfirenoise.shtml

I can't find his original paper (if one was written).
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