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Old 05-14-2019, 10:53 PM
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Default Confused on the legalities of firearms in National Forests

Hey everyone.

So here's the background. I'm (relatively) new to owning a firearm, though I've been shooting recreationally at ranges and on private property for most of my life. I do have a license to own my firearm, I have no felonies, misdemeanors, domestic violence charges, pending lawsuits, or speeding tickets. I have owned my gun since February of 2017 (A Kimber Custom II 1911 .45 ACP), and I do not yet have my CCW license.

I am planning a backpacking trip this August with a bunch of friends. I am leaning towards national forests rather than national or state parks because they tend to give longer backpacking trails, and because I have heard that I can carry my handgun with me. In Norcal, as I'm sure you all know, there's a good number of dangerous creatures, both of the four legged and two legged variety. I don't expect to see any, but if there happens to be an errant bear or the like, I'd like to have the chance of scaring it away or, in a last ditch effort, try to get it before it gets me or one of my hiking buddies.

Now, I'm not a scared cowboy looking for a fight, but I would simply be more comfortable if I had the option of self defense if the need arises. Better to have and not need than need and not have.

So while I was waiting for my registration to be approved, I read over the information here, contacted the Forestry Service for that particular National Forest (Shasta-Trinity), and read the firearm law summary. The National Forest Service guy got back to me fast, and this is exactly what they said;

Quote:
Originally Posted by U.S. Forest Service - Shasta-Trinity National Forest
Hi Brandon, The only laws the FS has regarding firearms are stated our forest website: https://www.fs.usda.gov/recmain/stnf/recreation

“It is prohibited to discharge a firearm or any other implement capable of taking human life, causing injury, or damaging property: (1) in or within 150 yards of a residence, building, campsite, developed recreation site, or occupied area, or (2) across or on a Forest Development road, or a body of water adjacent thereto, or in any manner or place whereby any person or property is exposed to injury or damage as a result of such discharge. (261.10d)”

For any other firearm regulations in the state please refer to the summary of California Firearms Law https://oag.ca.gov/firearms

State laws do apply on FS land.
Okay, that's perfectly reasonable. Let's check the state laws.

Quote:
Originally Posted by California Firearms Laws Summary
FIREARMS IN THE HOME, BUSINESS OR AT THE CAMPSITE

Unless otherwise unlawful, any person over the age of 18 who is not prohibited from possessing firearms may have a loaded or unloaded firearm at his or her place of residence, temporary residence, campsite or on private property owned or lawfully possessed by the person . Any person engaged in lawful business (including nonprofit organizations) or any officer, employee or agent authorized for lawful purposes connected with the business may have a loaded firearm within the place of business if that person is over 18 years of age and not otherwise prohibited from possessing firearms . (Pen . Code, §§ 25605, 26035 .)

NOTE: If a person’s place of business, residence, temporary residence, campsite or private property is located within an area where possession of a firearm is prohibited by local or federal laws, such laws would prevail.
And the information on the stickied thread says;

Quote:
Originally Posted by calguns.net
*2 - National Forest and BLM Details:

- LOC and UOC are legal everywhere except "prohibited areas" (areas where shooting is prohibited)
- LOC, UOC, UCC, and LCC are all legal in one's campsite. (PC 26055, 26383, & 25605)
- Shooting is prohibited within 150 yards of any residence, building, campsite, or developed site ("prohibited areas")
- Shooting is prohibited on or across roads or bodies of water ("prohibited areas")
- common opinion is that UOC of handguns is now illegal in "prohibited areas" of NF/BLM (AB144 / PC 26350) not all agree (PC 26388)
- Forest administrators have the authority to prohibit shooting in other areas of the NF but must clearly post this information ("prohibited areas")
- IMPORTANT NOTICE - some NFs are now banning shooting almost entirely - see this post - this makes the entire forest a "prohibited area"
- BLM administrators may post closures and restrictions regarding firearms use ("prohibited areas")

- LCC is legal for licensed hunters/fishermen, while hunting/fishing, but only where shooting is not prohibited (PC 25640)
- UCC is legal for licensed hunters/fishermen while hunting/fishing and while traveling to/from hunting/fishing expeditions (PC 25640)
- UOC is legal for licensed hunters while hunting and while traveling to/from hunting expeditions (PC 26366)
- CA CCW permit holders may disregard most of these restrictions and LCC in NF/BLM
So, if I am not mistaken (which I fear I may be) it seems like it is legal to open carry on National Forest land in my campsite, while camping. It is legal to fire my firearms, so long as I am 150 yards away from roads or campsites, and not shooting over roads, campsites or waterways.

However, I am still unsure about open carry specifically while backpacking. I would like to holster my pistol at my side while backpacking so that it is available in case of a threat.

I feel like I'm missing something obvious here. Anyone have experience/plain word answers?

Last edited by BrandonCornwell; 05-14-2019 at 10:56 PM..
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Old 05-14-2019, 11:00 PM
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It is not legal to carry where it is not legal to shoot. So if you got anywhere within 150yds of a camp, developed area, occupied area, or building, you would be carrying illegally. That is the peril, you may be somewhere prohibited from shooting and not know it.

Read that whole sticky thread, it discusses various scenarios that may apply. It seems that unless you are well and truly in the deep boonies away from everyone and everything, carry without CCW is a peril. I would not be open carrying on a well travelled trail.

Your best bet is to have CCW.

And note, there is no ‘license to own a firearm’ in CA.

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Old 05-14-2019, 11:05 PM
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Originally Posted by SkyHawk View Post
It is not legal to carry where it is not legal to shoot. So if you got anywhere within 150yds of a camp, developed area or building, you would carrying illegally. That is the peril, you may be somewhere prohibited from shooting and not know it.

Read that whole sticky thread, it discusses various scenarios that may apply.

Your best bet is to have CCW.

And note, there is no ‘license to own a firearm’ in CA.
That's fair. The little white card I got when I took the test and all that, then, so that I cease to be/sound ignorant, what specifically should I refer to that as? I was under the impression it was a license to own, but, as I said, I'm relatively new to owning (I always just shot what others owned) and there was a -lot- of information passed around that day.

The trail I am looking at is the Stuart Forks trail to Emerald Lake.
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Old 05-14-2019, 11:09 PM
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Originally Posted by BrandonCornwell View Post
That's fair. The little white card I got when I took the test and all that, then, so that I cease to be/sound ignorant, what specifically should I refer to that as? I was under the impression it was a license to own, but, as I said, I'm relatively new to owning (I always just shot what others owned) and there was a -lot- of information passed around that day.
That is a firearms safety card (FSC). It could expire or you could lose it and still be legal to own guns. That is required to acquire guns (or an exemption, like a CCW or hunting license or retired military or others), it is not required to retain guns.

And plenty of people still move here with guns, and do not ever need that card unless and until they plan to acquire a gun here. Plenty of others owned guns here before that card was ever a thing, and they still are legal to own those guns.

Some states do require a license to own, CA is not one (yet).
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Old 05-14-2019, 11:11 PM
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Originally Posted by SkyHawk View Post
That is a firearms safety card. It could expire or you could lose it and still be legal to own guns. That is required to acquire guns (or an exemption, like a CCW or hunting license or retired military or others), it is not required to retain guns.

Some states do require a license to own, CA is not one (yet).
Thank you very much for that clarification. I'm reading the other thread now. My primary concern is that some of the laws may have chanced since a lot of those posts have been updated.
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Old 05-14-2019, 11:50 PM
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Just a side thought, have you ever worn your sidearm and your pack? Try it at home before you go, you might want a chest holster
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Old 05-15-2019, 12:09 AM
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Just a side thought, have you ever worn your sidearm and your pack? Try it at home before you go, you might want a chest holster
I did see that Alaskan chest holster someone posted in the other thread, and it's attractive. I am also considering a Miami Classic holster, but I would worry that the straps of the backpack would jostle the holster and pistol. Frankly, to date, I've only ever really transported my firearm in the case it came with to and from ranges, and other than that, it's in the quick release safe bolted to my desk.

But yes, I did see where someone mentioned that a belt holster could become problematic with a backpack. I think they mentioned attaching the holster to their pack belt, but then it would come off when the pack came off. During a hike, that wouldn't bother me, and I suppose I could just move the holster to my belt when we camped for the night.

Thank you for the tip though! I will definitely see what is most comfortable. It seems to me that, on National Forest land, 150 yards away from public/developed/camping areas, I can legally carry my handgun LOC or UOC (with mags close at hand) without any legal repercussions.
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Old 05-15-2019, 7:32 AM
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Originally Posted by SkyHawk View Post
It is not legal to carry where it is not legal to shoot. So if you got anywhere within 150yds of a camp, developed area, occupied area, or building, you would be carrying illegally. That is the peril, you may be somewhere prohibited from shooting and not know it.

Read that whole sticky thread, it discusses various scenarios that may apply. It seems that unless you are well and truly in the deep boonies away from everyone and everything, carry without CCW is a peril. I would not be open carrying on a well travelled trail.

Your best bet is to have CCW.

And note, there is no ‘license to own a firearm’ in CA.
second line

LOC, UOC, UCC, and LCC are all legal in one's campsite. (PC 26055, 26383, & 25605)
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Old 05-15-2019, 7:44 AM
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I'm going to chime in as someone who has done some hiking and carried a handgun. Yes, it is reassuring to have it with you. You will also find that it's heavy and always seems to be in the way. Anyone who tells you to carry a big gun in case of bears probably never gets more than 500 yards from his truck. Bring something small and light, maybe even consider pepper spray instead.

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Old 05-15-2019, 8:01 AM
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Originally Posted by AGGRO View Post
second line

LOC, UOC, UCC, and LCC are all legal in one's campsite. (PC 26055, 26383, & 25605)
I was addressing his hiking plans specifically, which is what he was asking about.

In cased you missed it:

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandonCornwell View Post
However, I am still unsure about open carry specifically while backpacking. I would like to holster my pistol at my side while backpacking so that it is available in case of a threat.
He has already established that he can carry in his campsite, but that of course only means his campsite, not anyone else's campsite. Not to the bathroom or the water spigot in a public campground. Literally within the immediate area of his tent and that is it.

He wants to know about carrying on the trail. Did you have some advice for him, or ??

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Old 05-15-2019, 8:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
I'm going to chime in as someone who has done some hiking and carried a handgun. Yes, it is reassuring to have it with you. You will also find that it's heavy and always seems to be in the way. Anyone who tells you to carry a big gun in case of bears probably never gets more than 500 yards from his truck. Bring something small and light, maybe even consider pepper spray instead.
For sure, and that makes sense. Unfortunately, I only own the one handgun (my wife has an M&P Shield .40, but we're leaving that home for her home defense while I am away), so I've got to work with what I have. I definitely will look into getting some bear spray, but I have heard of cases of that not working to completely deter the bear. A sidearm would make me significantly more comfortable, with the hope of never having to use it.

Thank you for your suggestions!

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Old 05-15-2019, 8:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyHawk View Post
I was addressing his hiking plans specifically, which is what he was asking about.

In cased you missed it:



He has already established that he can carry in his campsite, but that of course only means his campsite, not anyone else's campsite. Not to the bathroom or the water spigot in a public campground. Literally within the immediate area of his tent and that is it.

He wants to know about carrying on the trail. Did you have some advice for him, or ??
The rules are pretty vague but I carry in Cleveland National Forest all the time. We leave from camp as in walk out and hunt. Unless there is some restriction such as prohibited by local authority it is legal to open carry while hiking.

https://www.fs.usda.gov/activity/tah...camping-cabins

Firearms and Fireworks: You may bring firearms into developed camps and picnic grounds; however, you may not discharge them near any developed sites or areas of public recreation use within 150 yards. It is illegal to discharge or ignite any type of firecracker, rocket or other firework or explosive on all National Forest lands.

Not sure what forest he's hiking but mine allows hunting and carrying firearms. There is also no distinction as to where in the campground you may or may not carry. The only place we can't carry is inside the rec area that is bow hunting only. You also cannot carry a firearm while bow hunting deer.

We had one Forest Service Officer tell us we couldn't have guns in camp and it was a 1000 dollar fine. So, I asked to see the regs to back that up as we hunt from camp, as in walk from our campsite to the hunting area. She didn't even bother to look it up and came up with an excuse to leave. An actual Game Warden said we could and has never hassled us and he comes through every day.


Some camper was upset we had sidearms.

https://www.fs.usda.gov/activity/cle...eation/hunting

I do suggest OnX maps as most areas are a patchwork of county parks, national forest, blm and private property. Last, carry and discharge are two completely different things and even LE has a hard time sorting it out.
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Old 05-15-2019, 8:57 AM
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Originally Posted by AGGRO View Post
The rules are pretty vague but I carry in Cleveland National Forest all the time. We leave from camp as in walk out and hunt. Unless there is some restriction such as prohibited by local authority it is legal to open carry while hiking.

https://www.fs.usda.gov/activity/tah...camping-cabins

Firearms and Fireworks: You may bring firearms into developed camps and picnic grounds; however, you may not discharge them near any developed sites or areas of public recreation use within 150 yards. It is illegal to discharge or ignite any type of firecracker, rocket or other firework or explosive on all National Forest lands.

Not sure what forest he's hiking but mine allows hunting and carrying firearms. There is also no distinction as to where in the campground you may or may not carry. The only place we can't carry is inside the rec area that is bow hunting only. You also cannot carry a firearm while bow hunting deer.

We had one Forest Service Officer tell us we couldn't have guns in camp and it was a 1000 dollar fine. So, I asked to see the regs to back that up as we hunt from camp, as in walk from our campsite to the hunting area. She didn't even bother to look it up and came up with an excuse to leave. An actual Game Warden said we could and has never hassled us and he comes through every day.


Some camper was upset we had sidearms.

https://www.fs.usda.gov/activity/cle...eation/hunting

I do suggest OnX maps as most areas are a patchwork of county parks, national forest, blm and private property. Last, carry and discharge are two completely different things and even LE has a hard time sorting it out.
Thank you for the information! I am looking at the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. I have absolutely zero plans for any recreational shooting. It is specifically as a 'rather-have-and-not-need-than-need-and-not-have" sidearm.
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Old 05-15-2019, 9:09 AM
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This is federal. Don't worry about carrying. It is discharging where the USFS comes into play. You are fine. Have fun.
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Old 05-15-2019, 9:12 AM
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Originally Posted by BrandonCornwell View Post
It is legal to fire my firearms, so long as I am 150 yards away from roads or campsites, and not shooting over roads, campsites or waterways.
A word of caution...

If you're thinking about plinking/target shooting while camping, be aware that you're talking about August in Northern California. That means things are likely to be dry and the Forest Service (along with other agencies) may implement some restrictions in an effort to avoid wildfires. Such restrictions would/could include shooting.

As an example, here's one of the 'smaller' 2018 fires in that neck of the woods last year - the Hat Fire. I can't find a link for the cause, but if I remember correctly, there was some discussion about the possibility of it being the result of shooting given the rather close proximity of the rifle range to the ignition point.

Such restrictions would be in addition to the standing ones; which include more than what you've noted. In other words, the regional supervisor has the authority to implement restrictions if/when they feel it necessary/prudent.

I know some people who live in that area (including several who lost homes) and, after the Carr and Camp Fires last year (along with the smaller, lesser reported ones such as the Hat Fire), they are, understandably, a bit skittish about fires right now. Even though many in that part of the State are open-minded about shooting, this is May. You're talking about being there in August when it is, generally, hot and dry. So, bear in mind that 'carrying' is one thing. 'Shooting' is something else, even if not 'officially' restricted.

ETA: I see you posted while I was composing this...

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandonCornwell
I have absolutely zero plans for any recreational shooting.
That's a safe start. Just bear in mind that if shooting becomes restricted, the restriction could include the carry of firearms.

Last edited by TrappedinCalifornia; 05-15-2019 at 9:18 AM..
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Old 05-15-2019, 9:18 AM
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There is also no distinction as to where in the campground you may or may not carry.
You can't legally carry in the common areas of a public campground without a carry permit. There is no ambiguity about it. State law says that you are exempt from carry laws only at your own campsite. State law applies in the Fed Forest.

Plenty of people who have carried in common areas (aka PUBLIC PLACE) of apartment complexes including gated complexes thinking it was OK because they lived there, have paid for the same mistake with prison time.

Quote:
25850.
(a) A person is guilty of carrying a loaded firearm when the person carries a loaded firearm on the person or in a vehicle while in any public place or on any public street in an incorporated city or in any public place or on any public street in a prohibited area of unincorporated territory.
Quote:
26055.
Nothing in Section 25850 shall prevent any person from having a loaded weapon, if it is otherwise lawful, at the person’s place of residence, including any temporary residence or campsite.

https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE...eprd493704.pdf

Quote:
State Law Does Apply to National Forest Lands
A few of the related State Firearms laws are listed below. Your local Sheriff’s Office is the best place to ask questions regarding these laws. (CAPC = California Penal Code).

CAPC 25400: Concealed Carry. It is illegal for any person to carry a handgun concealed upon his or her person or concealed in a vehicle without a license issued pursuant to CAPC 26150. A firearm locked in a motor vehicle’s trunk or in a locked container carried in the vehicle other than in the utility or glove compartment is not considered concealed within the meaning of the CAPC 25400; neither is a firearm carried within a locked container directly to or from a motor vehicle for any lawful purpose (CAPC 25610).
  • The prohibition from carrying a concealed handgun does not apply to licensed hunters or fishermen while engaged in hunting or fishing, or while going to or returning from the hunting expedition (CAPC 25640). Notwithstanding this exception for hunters or fishermen, these individuals may not carry or transport loaded firearms when going to or from the expedition . The unloaded firearms should be transported in the trunk of the vehicle or in a locked container other than the utility or glove compartment (CAPC 25610).

CAPC 25850: Open carry of a loaded firearm in public. It is illegal to carry a loaded firearm on one’s person or in a vehicle while in any public place, on any public street, or in any place where it is unlawful to discharge a firearm. (Note: does not apply to any person while hunting in an area where possession and hunting is otherwise lawful or while practice shooting at target ranges (CAPC 26005, 26040).
And it is illegal to carry anywhere that it is not legal to discharge. So yes - even if you are not shooting, if it would not be legal to shoot there - you can't carry there without a carry permit or some other exemption that may apply to hunters while hunting.

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Old 05-15-2019, 9:19 AM
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Originally Posted by TrappedinCalifornia View Post
A word of caution...

If you're thinking about plinking/target shooting while camping, be aware that you're talking about August in Northern California. That means things are likely to be dry and the Forest Service (along with other agencies) may implement some restrictions in an effort to avoid wildfires. Such restrictions would/could include shooting.

As an example, here's an example of one of the 'smaller' 2018 fires in that neck of the woods last here - the Hat Fire. I can't find a link for the cause, but if I remember correctly, there was some discussion about the possibility of it being the result of shooting given the rather close proximity of the rifle range to the ignition point.

Such restrictions would be in addition to the standing ones; which include more than what you've noted. In other words, the regional supervisor has the authority to implement restrictions if/when they feel it necessary/prudent.

I know some people who live in that area (including several who lost homes) and, after the Carr and Camp Fires last year (along with the smaller, lesser reported ones such as the Hat Fire), they are, understandably, a bit skittish about fires right now. Even though many in that part of the State are open-minded about shooting, this is May. You're talking about being there in August when it is, generally, hot and dry. So, bear in mind that 'carrying' is one thing. 'Shooting' is something else, even if not 'officially' restricted.
Oh, absolutely. I have absolutely zero plans for target shooting/plinking. This is strictly to have with me in case it is needed sort of thing. I would much rather just spend my time exploring our beautiful NorCal wilderness; it's been far too long since I've gotten out of my little city (I was born in and grew up in Humboldt, and I have family all over Humboldt, Trinity, and Shasta counties), and I need the mountains and lakes and forests. I am an author by trade, so I spend almost all of my time plugged in to a computer, and it's damaging my zen. However, a bear attack or especially ornery bipedal intruder would damage my zen even more, and while I will have a hand axe with me, I'd rather have something a little more effective against things other than kindling and underbrush.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrappedInCalifornia
ETA: I see you posted while I was composing this...

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandonCornwell
I have absolutely zero plans for any recreational shooting.
That's a safe start. Just bear in mind that if shooting becomes restricted, the restriction could include the carry of firearms.
Yup! I plan on talking to the ranger's HQ in Weaverville before we embark.

Last edited by BrandonCornwell; 05-15-2019 at 9:22 AM..
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Old 05-15-2019, 9:29 AM
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You can't legally carry in the common areas of a public campground without a carry permit. There is no ambiguity about it. State law says that you are exempt from carry laws only at your own campsite. State law applies in the Fed Forest.

Plenty of people who have carried in common areas (aka PUBLIC PLACE) of apartment complexes including gated complexes thinking it was OK because they lived there, have paid for the same mistake with prison time.
Do you have a link to this.
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Old 05-15-2019, 10:05 AM
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So, I'm speaking to the ranger's station in Weaverville right now, and the lady on the other end seems to be not terribly sure as to the specifics, but she's looking into it.

Well, she referred me to the Redding station, but none of the LEOs on staff were available. Everyone seems to be of the opinion that federal laws govern over state laws, but I'm not convinced that's accurate and nobody was confident enough to give a definitive answer. I left a message with them and will update this when/if they call me back.
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Old 05-15-2019, 10:28 AM
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So, I'm speaking to the ranger's station in Weaverville right now, and the lady on the other end seems to be not terribly sure as to the specifics, but she's looking into it.

Well, she referred me to the Redding station, but none of the LEOs on staff were available. Everyone seems to be of the opinion that federal laws govern over state laws, but I'm not convinced that's accurate and nobody was confident enough to give a definitive answer. I left a message with them and will update this when/if they call me back.
Make sure they quote you the number of the reg.

I've been hunting and camping on National Forest land here for 20 years and have seen the different officers come and go. On a weekly basis I see Cal Forest LE, Game and Fish, Sheriff, BP, Park Rangers you name it and out of all that time none of us has had a run on about firearms in the forest or anywhere in a primitive campground except the one woman who was new and couldn't find a reg to back up her claim it was 1000 dollar fine to have a firearm in a campground. I'm even looking at stuff for "loaded gun" in a camp and can't find anything.

So, if anyone does I'd like to see the reg number.
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Old 05-15-2019, 10:58 AM
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Alright, just got the call back which was... less than definitive, lol.

What the LE lady in the Redding office told me was that so long as I was adhering to state laws regarding my permit or lack thereof (i.e. no hunting without a hunting license, no shooting in prohibited areas/within 150 yards of developed areas (i.e. maintained public campsites, facilities, parking areas, etc), I would be fine. I told her I planned on getting an Alaskan style chest holster (thanks to some recommendations I've gotten and seen on here, thanks!), and she said that was perfectly fine, so open carry was good as far as she was concerned.

She said some tourists on the trail might get weird about it, but most people in the Shasta-Trinity NF were accepting and most of them were probably packing too, whether concealed or otherwise.

She was unable to cite any codes or regulations as she was extremely busy with training and meetings, but she seemed very nonchalant about it all. Her name was Lena, I believe.

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Old 05-15-2019, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by BrandonCornwell View Post
Alright, just got the call back which was... less than definitive, lol.

What the LE lady in the Redding office told me was that so long as I was adhering to state laws regarding my permit or lack thereof (i.e. no hunting without a hunting license, no shooting in prohibited areas/within 150 yards of developed areas (i.e. maintained public campsites, facilities, parking areas, etc), I would be fine. I told her I planned on getting an Alaskan style chest holster (thanks to some recommendations I've gotten and seen on here, thanks!), and she said that was perfectly fine, so open carry was good as far as she was concerned.

She said some tourists on the trail might get weird about it, but most people in the Shasta-Trinity NF were accepting and most of them were probably packing too, whether concealed or otherwise.

She was unable to cite any codes or regulations as she was extremely busy with training and meetings, but she seemed very nonchalant about it all. Her name was Lena, I believe.
Ain't it great they expect us to adhere to the laws, when they don't really know the laws.

Anyway, I'm not going to change up so long as all the LE where I hunt are fine with it. We even were surrounded by Sheriff and other LE around a fire (shared camp area) after they got a call about brandishing and it turned out some yahoo simply saw a hunter with a gun and called 911. Pretty sure if they were going to bust anyone for having a handgun in camp it would have been then. They asked us if we had handguns, we said yes and they posted a Sheriff with us until they got done interviewing the poor hunter. They said sorry about the hassle and left.

Thanks for taking the time to call and post.
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Old 05-15-2019, 12:37 PM
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If open carrying is an issue, as it tends to be in some areas even in National Forests, the Hill People Gear chest pouch works well with a pack. I carry mine regularly either with a Glock 19x or with a Glock 43. Either gun goes in the main pouch with a trigger guard that is tied off to a loop inside the pouch, which allows it to be drawn quickly. Here are a couple of pictures. Just one possible option.

IMG_9478.jpg

IMG_9479.jpg
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Old 05-15-2019, 3:31 PM
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To throw one more wrench into the mix... here in Central California there is lots of National Forest Land that has specific "wilderness" areas within. These wilderness areas, such as Ansel Adams Wilderness, John Muir Wilderness, Dinkey Lakes Wilderness, etc... can and do have more restrictive policies on firearms as well when it comes to discharging.
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Old 05-15-2019, 4:00 PM
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To throw one more wrench into the mix... here in Central California there is lots of National Forest Land that has specific "wilderness" areas within. These wilderness areas, such as Ansel Adams Wilderness, John Muir Wilderness, Dinkey Lakes Wilderness, etc... can and do have more restrictive policies on firearms as well when it comes to discharging.
The wilderness areas down here are more restricted to no motor vehicles, no fires etc. Firearms are no problem. Many people hiking the PCT freak out when they see us and we have to explain to them they are hiking in a hunting area which is both BLM and National Forest. Same as in the undeveloped campgrounds and most developed ones.

State Parks/County Parks and "Rec Areas" are a whole nother ball game. No guns unless locked and separated from ammo. Some lakes allow duck hunting though.
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Old 05-15-2019, 7:55 PM
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I am surprised that you did not talk to the Supervisors Office Law Enforcement folks for Six Rivers Nat'l Forest here in Eureka. I had worked for the US Forest Circus in Fisheries on all 4 Districts being HQ'd out of the Supervisors Office when it was on Fifth Street downtown years back. But then you are going over the the Shasta Trinity NF and will check with the Weaselville office. Don't forget to get your California Campfire Permit which is needed even for propane stoves which you can get in Eureka now at the Six Rivers NF Supervisor Office by the Bayshore Mall, and get a Forest Service Shasta/ Trinity NF Map. Maybe pick up copies of Six Rivers and Klamath Nat'l Forest maps for other areas not far from Humboldt.

Even with my CCW issued by the Humboldt County Sheriff's Office (which is easy to get by the way), I still use a Mil-Surplus style M-7 tankers shoulder/ chest holster when out in the boonies/ or on the 80 acres here above Humboldt Bay.



The best way to keep bears away, is to bear proof your food supply. One year when out in the field, a co-worker had a bear rip up their tent because they left toothpaste and their toothbrush in their tent. Maybe talk to one of the local Outdoor stores like Bucksport/ Outdoor Store/ Adventures Edge /Grunman's, etc. about bear spray if you are concerned/ I don't use it myself.

I don't worry about Yogi Bear here on the hilltop. They worry about me!

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Old 05-16-2019, 10:07 AM
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Just my 2 cents worth. I am familiar with the area I hunt near there. This is in the Trinity Alps Wilderness, there are no campgrounds. Campsites are just where someone has decided to camp. There may be some who frown upon your choice to carry. There will be bears. You may not see one but will see plenty of sign. If you yell at them they will run away as fast as they can.
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Old 05-16-2019, 7:07 PM
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Just my 2 cents worth. I am familiar with the area I hunt near there. This is in the Trinity Alps Wilderness, there are no campgrounds. Campsites are just where someone has decided to camp. There may be some who frown upon your choice to carry. There will be bears. You may not see one but will see plenty of sign. If you yell at them they will run away as fast as they can.
Exactly. Sometimes I think people post garbage to try and keep people away from the spots they hunt or camp. Just like all the fake no hunting signs.
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