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Blades, Bows and Tools Discussion of non-firearm weapons and camping/survival tools.

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  #1  
Old 09-29-2017, 8:01 AM
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Rusty_Shackleferd Rusty_Shackleferd is offline
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Default Benchmade Steep Country, good hunting knife?

When it came to knives, I had a disposable mindset. The Havalon Piranta was a prime example of a "knife" that materializes my mindset of what a hunting knife should be.

I've made a 180 degree change in my thinking. I want a durable fixed blade skinner that can keep an edge to process an elk. I've been pointed towards Benchmade's Steep Country. Does anyone have experience with it? Any alternative suggestions?
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Old 09-29-2017, 11:37 AM
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Buck has several great skinners that will do a great job, and many are Made in the USA anf carry a lifetime warranty.

The guide I hunt with uses Buck knives and he processes more game in a season than must hunters will in a lifetime.

I like my Buck Compadre...it's sold as a bushcraft blade but is great for skinning larger game like hogs and deer...I have not had the opportunity to use it on elk...yet.
The red paint is weird at first, but it grows on you. The wood scales work well when bloody or wet.
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  #3  
Old 09-29-2017, 11:40 AM
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cant go wrong with anything benchmade. they make some good stuff.
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Old 09-29-2017, 1:38 PM
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I'm not a hunter but do carry S30V, holds a pretty good edge but also takes longer to get that edge. If butchering a large animal in the field you may need to touch up the blade..... Just something to think about.
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Old 09-29-2017, 4:19 PM
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Most guides have a lot more hands on experience and like jeepergeo said bucks are a very popular among the guides. I have been on 3 guided hunts and 2 of them uses buck knives with Swarovski scopes and binoculars. This tells me they are not cheap in using money to help their customers. I do hunt with a guide who is also a friend of mine and he turned me into bark river knives, the gunny and the fox river models. They are twice as much as a buck knife but I was sold on their blade quality and edge retention last year. I am about to buy two soon before my hunt in late October to Wyoming.


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Old 10-10-2017, 12:55 PM
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The Steep Country is one of my favorite do all knives for hunting. It is small enough to put inside the animal for gutting, large enough to use for skinning, and the gimping and handle allow you to hang on to the blade when your up to your elbows in blood. I am also a big fan of S30V for its ability to hold an edge with minimal maintenance. If I was going to carry just one blade for hunting, it would be the Steep Country.
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Old 10-10-2017, 5:16 PM
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I have hunted elk for many years, and when I used buck knives I always had a back up because the blade would eventually dull. I contemplated getting a disposable blade Havalon knife, but passed on them and bought a Bark River. I have read a lot of good reviews on Havalon knives. I have two Bark River knives with CPM 3V blades that never seem to dull, and either can process an elk without needing a sharpening.
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyD View Post
I have hunted elk for many years, and when I used buck knives I always had a back up because the blade would eventually dull. I contemplated getting a disposable blade Havalon knife, but passed on them and bought a Bark River. I have read a lot of good reviews on Havalon knives. I have two Bark River knives with CPM 3V blades that never seem to dull, and either can process an elk without needing a sharpening.
after spending hours pouring through youtube videos, reading blogs and forums i just bought 4 knives for my upcoming hunting trip. Last year my kodiac skinner with japanese blade dulled out on me mid deer process. I didn't bring a sharpener so had to borrow my friends knives. For this trip i am bringing a havalon, mora companion, and bark river fox river and gunny hunter in 3v steel.

i see quality knives as an heirloom piece, something my son can say later was pappa's old hunting knife.
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Old 10-15-2017, 5:55 AM
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I use an old Sheffield and a set of
two Alaskan knives. Never had to sharpen on a dress out.
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  #10  
Old 10-24-2017, 7:46 PM
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Update: I ended up changing my mind. I picked up Benchmade's Hidden Canyon Hunter because I wanted a knife that specialized in skinning, rather than a jack of all trades, master of none that the Steep Country would have been. I'll bring my Havalon or a Morakniv as needed for more precise work.
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Old 10-30-2017, 11:57 AM
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Good choice, Rusty. The Hidden Canyon Hunter and Saddle Mountain Skinner are the two knives I bring into the backcountry hunting. The Hidden Canyon is my gutting tool and joint break down knife, and the Saddle Mountain is a great dedicated skinner.
Good luck on your hunt!
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