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  #1  
Old 03-13-2018, 10:24 AM
Sousuke Sousuke is offline
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Default Safe install Question

I've recently moved and will be installing my safe asap.

My previous house was a rental so I used threaded concrete bolts to secure it to a slab. When I moved, I unscrewed them and filled the holes with concrete filler. (Anchor types you generally have to cutoff leaving the metal in the slab).

I now own so I can do as I please. Is it really necessary to use anchor type bolts or do you think my threaded bolts were adequate? I think both types defend well against tipping / pry attempts.

I used these previously: https://www.zoro.com/zoro-select-con...oaAmKfEALw_wcB

I know most recommend these: https://www.google.com/search?q=conc...rgpusZCZOcUpM:
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Old 03-13-2018, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sousuke View Post
I've recently moved and will be installing my safe asap.

My previous house was a rental so I used threaded concrete bolts to secure it to a slab. When I moved, I unscrewed them and filled the holes with concrete filler. (Anchor types you generally have to cutoff leaving the metal in the slab).

I now own so I can do as I please. Is it really necessary to use anchor type bolts or do you think my threaded bolts were adequate? I think both types defend well against tipping / pry attempts.

I used these previously: https://www.zoro.com/zoro-select-con...oaAmKfEALw_wcB

I know most recommend these: https://www.google.com/search?q=conc...rgpusZCZOcUpM:
For me, the more secure, the better.

I used anchor type into the slab AND lag bolts through the back of the safe into a couple of wall studs.
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Old 03-13-2018, 10:57 AM
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Just make sure your slab isn't post tension. Or if it is, know EXACTLY where the steel is before you drill
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Old 03-13-2018, 11:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVT-40 View Post
Just make sure your slab isn't post tension. Or if it is, know EXACTLY where the steel is before you drill
Is there a way of finding the tension cables with a metal detector? We luckily "found" one while jackhammering the slab on a re-model.

Last edited by smoothy8500; 03-13-2018 at 11:22 AM..
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Old 03-13-2018, 11:57 AM
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I used the "wedge anchor" type and I added a fender washer.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Red-Head...1016/100045628

A hammer drill and masonry bit make for quick work. Should take you 25-35 mins max. Hammer the anchors in and tighten down the nuts.

Before you butt the safe up to a wall and secure it to the slab, run the elec for your light and dry rod first. Once it's bolted down the 4 studs don't allow a lot of movement even when they are loose.
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Old 03-13-2018, 12:00 PM
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Anchors are the way to go. Look at the pull out rating for each option you are considering (compare same bolt diameters) and you will see why anchors are stronger. The exception might be some of the epoxy grout solutions, but those are more complicated than needed.

And don't underestimate pry access and tipping access limitations...those can be just as important as bolting down. And keep in mind, many safe break ins are accomplished via cutting sides or tops.
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Last edited by Jeepergeo; 03-13-2018 at 12:03 PM..
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Old 03-13-2018, 1:16 PM
Sousuke Sousuke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVT-40 View Post
Just make sure your slab isn't post tension. Or if it is, know EXACTLY where the steel is before you drill
Its not, its a typical rebar pour.
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Old 03-13-2018, 1:17 PM
Sousuke Sousuke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeepergeo View Post
Anchors are the way to go. Look at the pull out rating for each option you are considering (compare same bolt diameters) and you will see why anchors are stronger. The exception might be some of the epoxy grout solutions, but those are more complicated than needed.

And don't underestimate pry access and tipping access limitations...those can be just as important as bolting down. And keep in mind, many safe break ins are accomplished via cutting sides or tops.
At the old house it was a good setup. I had it in a semi hidden cabinet and there was only 3" of clearance on top and about 6" to 8 on the sides.
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  #9  
Old 03-13-2018, 6:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Powder_Keg View Post
I used the "wedge anchor" type and I added a fender washer.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Red-Head...1016/100045628

A hammer drill and masonry bit make for quick work. Should take you 25-35 mins max. Hammer the anchors in and tighten down the nuts.

Before you butt the safe up to a wall and secure it to the slab, run the elec for your light and dry rod first. Once it's bolted down the 4 studs don't allow a lot of movement even when they are loose.
This is what I used as well.

Thin sharpie to mark the holes then move the safe and drill. Move safe back and hammer in the anchors and bolt down
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  #10  
Old 03-13-2018, 6:22 PM
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use the red heads. much better. even better are the epoxy bolts, if you do it right, they wont come out without a chunk of concrete, which is held down by the wt of your safe.
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  #11  
Old 03-14-2018, 5:49 AM
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I guess it depends where you put the safe.
Mine is in a closet in a bedroom.
Unlikely to get a fork lift in there, so I used 5/8 threaded bolts.
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  #12  
Old 03-14-2018, 8:28 AM
crazyhorse305 crazyhorse305 is offline
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Default anchor bolt

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072QZ36M5...&pd_rd_w=j3T5V


these are best anchor bolt for concrete floor, drill the hole, drop in anchor bolt, make sure the nut is level with top of thread, hammer the top pin the bottom of anchor expand and you done, no need to tighten nut, will tighten while you hammer the top pin, I install all my safe this way.
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Old 03-14-2018, 10:06 PM
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http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/s...d.php?t=731447

Here's a good thread about it.
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  #14  
Old 03-14-2018, 10:15 PM
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The safe is a 5’ lever.... the screws will pull out easily

If you own the home, do it once and do it secure
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Old 03-15-2018, 2:03 PM
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Waffleobill Waffleobill is offline
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Drill and anchor bolts for me!
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Old 03-15-2018, 2:48 PM
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I used the screw in types as well. It's in my garage. There's no way that safe is gonna be knocked over. The reason I chose screw in over the anchor bolts is because if you ever decide to move it, you'll have to LIFT the safe up off of them to move it. Starts to matter when you get up there in weight. Mine for instance, is over 1000 pounds and up against a wall. I can't imagine ever having to move it if it was installed with anchor bolts. Just my .02
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