Calguns.net  

Home My iTrader Join the NRA Donate to CGSSA Sponsors CGN Google Search
CA Semiauto Ban(AW)ID Flowchart CA Handgun Ban ID Flowchart CA Shotgun Ban ID Flowchart
Go Back   Calguns.net > GENERAL DISCUSSION > Technology and Internet
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

Technology and Internet Emerging and current tech related issues. Internet, DRM, IP, and other technology related discussions.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-25-2013, 6:29 PM
stilly's Avatar
stilly stilly is online now
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Currently in a shanty I made in the river bottom by Eastvale.
Posts: 9,140
iTrader: 44 / 100%
Default So what is the easiest way to get enterprise experience?

So I was going through the hiring process at ESRI and I made it to stage 3 of 4 and then they said sorry, there was no position available for me. I sent an e-mail asking what I did wrong and she actually called me back and talked with me over the phone for a few minutes. (how cool are they still?) She told me that I was a great guy and she enjoyed talking with me but the one thing that I was lacking was enterprise experience and ESRI prefers to hire engineers, GIS certs or GIS guys and folks with enterprise backgrounds (to cut back on training perhaps?) and the other candidates had that where I did not. And of course, I could have furnished a full page of references that would have given me glowing reccos but it did not matter because it was all SOHO experience...

So, I have only seen an internship offered at the City of Rancho Cucamonga (which I just interviewed for) and I THINK it went well but damn, it seems that this is the only thing that I am missing to get a job now unless I go with a small time business and work private sector until who knows when being a little tech maybe or something else I dunno.

But like, why don't they offer internships at other places or do they and I am just not looking in the right spot, OR, is there a different but documented way to get that experience? I think I have like $600 left for unemployment and then I am done so I really want to get this ball rolling now ASAP.

BTW, I will be heading over to Indeed again, that was a great place. They had a lot of things there, I think that I could have possibly found something had I known about that place last year...
__________________
`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves...

Need GOOD SS pins to clean your brass? Try the new and improved model...


Author of the NY Times Best Selling book: How to Cheat and Win Like a Pro at Solitare
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-26-2013, 7:50 AM
Mute's Avatar
Mute Mute is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Diamond Bar
Posts: 5,643
iTrader: 22 / 100%
Default

Perhaps look for support level jobs or internship (rather than skill specific positions) at engineering firms that uses GIS on an enterprise level. I've been out of the IT game for some time now but I can't imagine it's that much different now. What are your resources for looking for opportunities? Have you considered a headhunter?
__________________
NRA Life Endowment Member
NRA Certified Pistol, Rifle & Refuse To Be A Victim Instructor

American Marksman Training Group, LLC
Visit our American Marksman Facebook Page
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-26-2013, 7:59 AM
stilly's Avatar
stilly stilly is online now
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Currently in a shanty I made in the river bottom by Eastvale.
Posts: 9,140
iTrader: 44 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mute View Post
Perhaps look for support level jobs or internship (rather than skill specific positions) at engineering firms that uses GIS on an enterprise level. I've been out of the IT game for some time now but I can't imagine it's that much different now. What are your resources for looking for opportunities? Have you considered a headhunter?
I have been laid off since last April and looking all over the place. Any local staffing people have not really been helpful.

I do not need GIS experience, I just want the enterprise so that I can look a little better on paper.

I started with Edjoin and city websites then added indeed and had a few looks at dice. I also went to some of the local hospital pages and stuff also when I got wind folks were looking. There are so many places to look and I do not really know them so I have only been looking at a few.
__________________
`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves...

Need GOOD SS pins to clean your brass? Try the new and improved model...


Author of the NY Times Best Selling book: How to Cheat and Win Like a Pro at Solitare
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-26-2013, 8:38 AM
ocabj's Avatar
ocabj ocabj is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Riverside
Posts: 7,133
iTrader: 40 / 100%
Default

My campus has quite a few new recent IT jobs posted:

https://irecruitportal.ucr.edu/irecr...ue&profile_id=

Looks like an IT Security Analyst position was just posted. There's an untitled "Programmer Analyst 2" position that looks like a help desk position, too.

Quote:
Under the general direction of Assistant Dean, Graduate Division and the Executive Director of Academic Senate, the purpose of this position is to design, develop, test, troubleshoot, maintain, and document software applications for the web, develop, support and maintain various electronic communications tools including web pages and electronic customer relationship management (CRM) systems, and provide mid- to high-level Mac & Windows desktop computer support to Graduate Division and Academic Senate staff.
__________________

Distinguished Rifleman #1924
NRA Certified Instructor (Rifle and Metallic Cartridge Reloading) and RSO
https://www.ocabj.net | http://jocabphoto.com

My AR15 Service Rifle - Used for CMP/NRA High Power Service Rifle Competitions
My Eliseo R5 (Remington 700) Tube Gun - Used for NRA High Power (Match Category) Competitions
My M1 Garand Service Rifle - Used for JCG Matches, rebuilt by Dean's Gun Restorations
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-26-2013, 9:29 AM
spamsucker spamsucker is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 707
iTrader: 6 / 100%
Default

Enterprise means to most of us that work in them, large and or complex installations. If you want experience in that then the only way is to get a gig with a large company and pay your dues for a while. You'll probably start at half the salary that you were thinking might be your starting range but that's how you start.

If you want to try a realistic path, find a low level sysadmin gig and work your way up. There is no free lunch in tech. Check out the porn industry. They're always having to deal with scaling issues which is what the people griping about enterprise experience are wanting.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-26-2013, 10:31 AM
ocabj's Avatar
ocabj ocabj is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Riverside
Posts: 7,133
iTrader: 40 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spamsucker View Post
Check out the porn industry. They're always having to deal with scaling issues which is what the people griping about enterprise experience are wanting.
Guy I knew in college worked for one of the Adult ID check companies. He had a pretty sweet gig. Had to fly out to Amsterdam every month to work in the datacenters they had there. He was a pothead, so it worked out for him.
__________________

Distinguished Rifleman #1924
NRA Certified Instructor (Rifle and Metallic Cartridge Reloading) and RSO
https://www.ocabj.net | http://jocabphoto.com

My AR15 Service Rifle - Used for CMP/NRA High Power Service Rifle Competitions
My Eliseo R5 (Remington 700) Tube Gun - Used for NRA High Power (Match Category) Competitions
My M1 Garand Service Rifle - Used for JCG Matches, rebuilt by Dean's Gun Restorations
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-26-2013, 7:21 PM
NYT's Avatar
NYT NYT is offline
CGN/CGSSA Contributor
CGN Contributor
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Auburn, CA
Posts: 2,454
iTrader: 25 / 100%
Default

call temp recruiters. i hire temps all the time for quick jobs here and there, rollouts, etc.

build up your exp that way and have it clearly documented on your resume.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-27-2013, 8:59 AM
stilly's Avatar
stilly stilly is online now
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Currently in a shanty I made in the river bottom by Eastvale.
Posts: 9,140
iTrader: 44 / 100%
Default

Thanks for the leads guys. I will head back to UCR and look for some more temp tech recruiters.
__________________
`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves...

Need GOOD SS pins to clean your brass? Try the new and improved model...


Author of the NY Times Best Selling book: How to Cheat and Win Like a Pro at Solitare
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-27-2013, 11:48 PM
stonith3901 stonith3901 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 166
iTrader: 3 / 100%
Default

I am currently in the technology industry. I came in with a music degree and no certificates. Although I did have the big words in my resume and experience through smaller companies, it really came to the technical questions. How I was able to learn, apply, and converse about things on a technical level.

My advice is to bring up a virtual machine, run something like VMware ESXi, KVM, Xen server or whatever virtualization technology and learn the enterprise operating system you want to excel at. Run it on a cloud based server, Amazon, Linode and the likes and dabble. Dabble and break the server, fix it, learn from your mistakes and apply your knowledge. Cant fix it, no harm done, reinstall and learn from it. The beauty of virtualization, redundancy, clustering and expensive toys. The enterprise world.

There are also simulators so you dont have to have the money to dabble with real physical network gear or load balancers.

I remember interviewing a person that had everything under the sun (as in microsystems), oc48, bgp, mpls, hp aix, netapp, emc, brocade, mcdata, f5, netscaler you name it, couldnt answer any of my technical questions and had to inform him that the position was for a systems engineer. Not a project manager that lead projects with those fancy names.

I also did not progress with another candidate that worked for NASA and has worked with **** that involved in hubble telescope. He was an excellent storage engineer, unfortunately thats all he knew and literally lived in that fenced world. We needed someone with a more overall knowledge and not specialized in one particular area. It can be a double edged sword.

Aside from the technical aspects, one needs to have the drive and passion to be in this industry. If you want to clock in and clock out, not participate with oncall (like doctors) to fix an issue at 3-4pm in Europe then the bigger enterprise world isnt for you. Stay in the smaller companies or helpdesk we dont want people that puts in their time and clock out, it hurts the team.

Good luck.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-28-2013, 7:48 PM
stilly's Avatar
stilly stilly is online now
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Currently in a shanty I made in the river bottom by Eastvale.
Posts: 9,140
iTrader: 44 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by stonith3901 View Post
I am currently in the technology industry. I came in with a music degree and no certificates. Although I did have the big words in my resume and experience through smaller companies, it really came to the technical questions. How I was able to learn, apply, and converse about things on a technical level.

My advice is to bring up a virtual machine, run something like VMware ESXi, KVM, Xen server or whatever virtualization technology and learn the enterprise operating system you want to excel at. Run it on a cloud based server, Amazon, Linode and the likes and dabble. Dabble and break the server, fix it, learn from your mistakes and apply your knowledge. Cant fix it, no harm done, reinstall and learn from it. The beauty of virtualization, redundancy, clustering and expensive toys. The enterprise world.

There are also simulators so you dont have to have the money to dabble with real physical network gear or load balancers.

I remember interviewing a person that had everything under the sun (as in microsystems), oc48, bgp, mpls, hp aix, netapp, emc, brocade, mcdata, f5, netscaler you name it, couldnt answer any of my technical questions and had to inform him that the position was for a systems engineer. Not a project manager that lead projects with those fancy names.

I also did not progress with another candidate that worked for NASA and has worked with **** that involved in hubble telescope. He was an excellent storage engineer, unfortunately thats all he knew and literally lived in that fenced world. We needed someone with a more overall knowledge and not specialized in one particular area. It can be a double edged sword.

Aside from the technical aspects, one needs to have the drive and passion to be in this industry. If you want to clock in and clock out, not participate with oncall (like doctors) to fix an issue at 3-4pm in Europe then the bigger enterprise world isnt for you. Stay in the smaller companies or helpdesk we dont want people that puts in their time and clock out, it hurts the team.

Good luck.
Good stuff to know. But how do I get started in vmware and the virtual machines? I saw references to people wanting to run an ESXi box on another thread I was reading about but I did not know what one of those was. That sounds like a couple of books might be needed.

Also, I know you did not, but just in case ANYONE has that opinion of me: Please do not EVER call me that. When it comes to computers they are my life. I am no poser that just wants to wear the team colors and look cool. Sadly though I have not had my eyes opened to the world that is really there and I only know what others have shown me (with extra exploration needed on my part) with the exception of this Linux stuff that is getting to be more and more fun each day. I have never been a guy to take a job and just show up to collect a paycheck. I like to think that I am making a difference with even the little things that I do.

Matter of fact, today another lawfirm (on the opposite side of the building) gave me their contact info and they want me to give them an estimate on "fixing" their completely wireless network to be wired. All I thought was, My gawd this is a HUGE job (not a high paying job, just a huge job) that may take a couple of days or more to straighten out. But I think that based on what ESRI told me and after talking, I think I can do that as well. I will be calling them back in a day to set up another more detailed appointment to get all of the work straightened out. But damn, I might need another thousand feet of cable and some more rj-45 ends... I also need to look up ways to make a solid bullet proof wireless connection that passes through a hallway to connect one office to the other two. I am not wanting to drill holes in the building and run cables up the walls and over the lighting tiles. I even thought about getting that thin cat-6 cable that is meant to go under carpet. Maybe fish that puppy through and cut a piece of the carpet out...

Anyways. In reality I might just go with a strong WAP on the walls of each office maybe. :\

Damn, now that I think of it, if I gain any more clients there that want networks installed, Maybe I will just rent an office there and build up a huge network over the entire building and then just run each office out on subnets... Oh this could be very enterprising... pun intended. (yes, I suspect that I might be bi-polar with delusions of grandeur at times...)
__________________
`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves...

Need GOOD SS pins to clean your brass? Try the new and improved model...


Author of the NY Times Best Selling book: How to Cheat and Win Like a Pro at Solitare

Last edited by stilly; 08-28-2013 at 7:59 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 08-30-2013, 4:28 PM
Cowboy T's Avatar
Cowboy T Cowboy T is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: PAULestine, USA
Posts: 3,793
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

True, there's no shortcut in tech. I'm currently a systems engineer for large networks. Here's how I did it.

I built several computers with (at the time) Windows NT 3.50 and 3.51 (yes, this is going back) and made a domain. There was a PDC as the print server and a BDC as the file server. My workstation was running Windows NT Server 3.51 in "member server" mode, so I got all the server admin tools. Hooked it up in a network and used that entire network as my "daily computer". That meant I had to regular administrative tasks on that network. That got me my first job at the local State University, building basically what I had built at home, just with more workstations (this setup was remarkably scalable for university LAN's at the time, which is why I built it at home).

Time goes on. The university got me my "Big Enterprise Experience", and I was off to the races. Eventually, after resisting it as "paper tiger" nonsense, I got the MCSE to get past HR droids who sort by keyword instead of actual experience. The MCSE, combined with my university experience, got me an INFOSEC job for the DoD. From there, things just kinda snowballed to where I am now.

The first step is all-important. Build an enterprise-style network at home and work with it. Nowadays, that would mean--for me--at a minimum the following things:

1.) Two servers of some sort. I mean physical servers, i. e. bare metal. On top of these, you can be running server OS's or VMware or Linux KVM or whatever.
2.) A managed switch, like a Cisco Catalyst, or NorTel 450T, HP ProCurve, or similar, that supports 802.1Q VLAN's.
3.) A Cisco or Juniper router as your home broadband router.
4.) A business broadband account with at least two static IP addresses. The first is for your router, and the second is for your VPN Concentrator (this can be another Cisco or Juniper router, or OpenBSD VPN gateway, or similar).
5.) Your workstation.

That should be enough to get you started. It sure did serve me well.

NOTE: my cameralady, "Miss B.H.C." is watching me type this. I had not realized the pun I just made ("serve me well"). Yuk yuk
__________________
"San Francisco Liberal With A Gun"
F***ing with people's heads, one gun show at a time. Hallelujah!
http://www.sanfranciscoliberalwithagun.com (reloading info w/ videos)
http://www.liberalsguncorner.com (podcast)
http://www.youtube.com/sfliberal (YouTube channel)
----------------------------------------------------
To be a true Liberal, you must be 100% pro-Second Amendment. Anything less is inconsistent with liberalism.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08-31-2013, 7:21 PM
stilly's Avatar
stilly stilly is online now
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Currently in a shanty I made in the river bottom by Eastvale.
Posts: 9,140
iTrader: 44 / 100%
Default

0o0o0o that is nice. That is what I was wanting to make too.

I have enough hardware to make some sort of servers. I am sure that with the 5+ computers that I have I can make something work. + Linux Untangle and other OSes I can grab.

I actually have a Cisco Catalyst managed switch but I am not sure what it supports.

Cisco or Juniper router? How much does a business broadband account cost? Is that the T-3 for $1500 a month?

Workstations are easy. I got laptops and other computers for that.

Why is it important to have a Cisco or Juniper router versus an all in one router/modem that I found on Amazon? This seems scaleable like you said and seems like a decent starting point. Why the need for two servers though? I was just going to make an untangle box and let it loose, but hmmm...
__________________
`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves...

Need GOOD SS pins to clean your brass? Try the new and improved model...


Author of the NY Times Best Selling book: How to Cheat and Win Like a Pro at Solitare
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-01-2013, 3:55 AM
Germz's Avatar
Germz Germz is offline
CGN/CGSSA Contributor
CGN Contributor
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 4,875
iTrader: 106 / 100%
Blog Entries: 6
Default

get positions as a government contractor. I dont work at a regional service center and provide remote administrative management of AD and some network infrastructure via TACACS, and a good lot of the contractors do as well.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 09-01-2013, 3:28 PM
LittleOldLady's Avatar
LittleOldLady LittleOldLady is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 240
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Color yourself brown and move to a Middle Eastern country. I can't get rehired for the life of me!

I started with Commodore/3.11/NT etc etc.

Had a PDC/BDC NT with a Novell controller plus all the extra's. Added Linux and Mac etc etc. Got hired did some stuff made some $$ then the crash happened. If I find a job I am either too old or want too much or a combination of the both. Or maybe I have the wrong plumbing who knows.

Good luck matey!
__________________
"But if someone has a gun and is trying to kill you ... it would be reasonable to shoot back with your own gun."

Dalai Lama

A system of licensing and registration is the perfect device to deny gun ownership to the bourgeoisie.

Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

Last edited by LittleOldLady; 09-01-2013 at 3:31 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-01-2013, 3:49 PM
d4v0s d4v0s is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Ventura
Posts: 1,626
iTrader: 5 / 100%
Default

For the law office portion look into the unifi wireless bridges.

1gbps and indoor/outdoor capable.

The experience part, just gotta do your time. I started as a comp tech and fixed problems and proved myself one project at a time. There is no free lunch you will continue to be challenged and always need to apply common sense upgrades and repairs where you work.

Btw took me 5 years to move up. Sucked but I got my bachelors in there and made a name for myself.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 09-02-2013, 12:46 AM
hcbr's Avatar
hcbr hcbr is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 4,554
iTrader: 65 / 100%
Default

Stilly, it's all about experience, and the certs definitely helps along the way when you gain your experience.

PM me your resume, my work is looking for a couple of help desk positions if interested. Otherwise, my advice is if you want to look for internships, just look deeper on company websites or go to job fairs, seen alot of the recruiter/HR folks there offering starting positions and internships on the spot.

Hope that helps
__________________
Be the change that you wish to see in the world.
Mahatma Gandhi

"A bullet sounds the same in every language..."
Stewie Griffin (Family Guy Episode: Stewie Griffin: The Untold Story 2005)
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 09-02-2013, 3:15 AM
edwardschlacter11 edwardschlacter11 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 3
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

sorry to hear about that man
its a tough task to find jobs at this sector,
especially if you are not experienced enough
_________________________________
Visa For Canada | Web Designing Companies in Delhi
Wedding Planners in Delhi
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 09-02-2013, 5:02 AM
LittleOldLady's Avatar
LittleOldLady LittleOldLady is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 240
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hcbr View Post
Stilly, it's all about experience, and the certs definitely helps along the way when you gain your experience.

PM me your resume, my work is looking for a couple of help desk positions if interested. Otherwise, my advice is if you want to look for internships, just look deeper on company websites or go to job fairs, seen alot of the recruiter/HR folks there offering starting positions and internships on the spot.

Hope that helps
Where are you located???

I have been looking for a job for years and years....
__________________
"But if someone has a gun and is trying to kill you ... it would be reasonable to shoot back with your own gun."

Dalai Lama

A system of licensing and registration is the perfect device to deny gun ownership to the bourgeoisie.

Vladimir Ilyich Lenin
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 09-02-2013, 6:12 AM
The War Wagon's Avatar
The War Wagon The War Wagon is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: da' 'BURGH
Posts: 4,869
iTrader: 10 / 100%
Wink

I think Starfleet has to approve your transfer, unless Capt. Kirk specifically requests you.

Wait... - what?
__________________

Sooo
... HOW'D that RINO work out for ya'... AGAIN!
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 09-02-2013, 6:27 AM
mrkubota's Avatar
mrkubota mrkubota is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Eastern, AZ - SoCal, CA
Posts: 1,425
iTrader: 47 / 100%
Default

have you check out the wireless/wireline telecom companies yet?

Most everything runs through some kind of router these days and being able to troubleshoot routing/packet errors on multiple vendor systems is a plus.

http://www22.verizon.com/jobs/verizo...network-jobs-1

http://att.jobs/?RIAConsoleLogLevel=4000

If you already have OSP engineering experience and practical experience with MicroStation/AutoCad/IDDS, then there's a 30mo contract job with Verizon up in the Victorville area I know of.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 09-02-2013, 6:46 PM
openhelix's Avatar
openhelix openhelix is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 80
iTrader: 3 / 100%
Default

I'd suggest reaching out to a cattle co like RHI (Robert Half Intl). High churn due to burnout but lots of experience quick. Or look at local IT Services (consulting) companies and ask them for an intern type position. You'll do crap work like learning scripting languages and writing automation scripts for awhile but you'll learn a lot. Build servers (in VM) en masse. Grab a book and follow it step by step. If you want to go Windows, I'd suggest Server 2012 Unleashed. It has step by step server build chapters and covers AD, DNS, DHCP, etc from an enterprise perspective.

If you were in NorCal I might be able to help with a tech support position at my company but not much in SoCal for us ATM.

Last edited by openhelix; 09-02-2013 at 6:47 PM.. Reason: spelling
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 09-04-2013, 2:22 PM
Deadbolt's Avatar
Deadbolt Deadbolt is offline
CGSSA Associate
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 6,590
iTrader: 3 / 100%
Default

stab in the dark - but to someone working in "enterprises" for about a decade and moving seats about 6-7x in as many years....

"enterprise experience" to me means you are familiar with the issues that large(r), distributed organizations face. I put pixels in specific places within the context of URL consuming devices and make sure said devices consume said pixels efficiently and artistically. That being said - working in large(r) distributed organizations very much gives you insight into user issues, systems architecture issues, political issues (don't get me started on a 2year discussion we had with another department on why Silverlight was not a sustainable direction.... sadly that advice was not heeded.... ) that you will literally never face in small shops

It's unfortunately something you can't get without "just doing." With large(r) organizations, you'll have many, many interconnected, business critical systems, literally duct taped together in order to bring product to market. From the glimpses i've seen of the admin side in these organizations, it was something of an art form, between us web designers (stop calling yourselves developers - you're designing interaction and architecture) and the network engineers, the dance we danced to keep these behemoths running and performing in a "somewhat contemporary nature" was nothing short of astounding.

Skeletons in the closet. Only instead of these skeletons being leud encounters between adults in public restrooms - they are filthy little secrets like ancient cronjobs that string together deprecated and abandoned systems into the SSO configuration / token system -- or my personal favorite - a prior admin of 15yrs was fired and never turned over various root user/password combinations, and has untold numbers of automated processes running on his user account. So rather than figure out what needs to be moved to a designated system's agent account - the user record just has it's password changed and "JohnW" 's account continues for years to be responsible for ISO certified processes in order to continue to meet service agreements ( )

"Enterprise" is short for "how many terrible things have you witnessed, documented, discussed, and eventually maintained because the business was not interested in addressing a non-critical but philosophically terrible process?"

:lol: gl with the hunt sir or madam
__________________
Just another Boy and His Dog.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 09-06-2013, 7:33 AM
stilly's Avatar
stilly stilly is online now
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Currently in a shanty I made in the river bottom by Eastvale.
Posts: 9,140
iTrader: 44 / 100%
Default

It looks like Rancho was happy with me, and that is great, but now I need to find a job. There is a lot of info here, I have to read and process it and I will get back to some of you.

Thanks.
__________________
`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves...

Need GOOD SS pins to clean your brass? Try the new and improved model...


Author of the NY Times Best Selling book: How to Cheat and Win Like a Pro at Solitare
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 09-06-2013, 9:22 PM
todd2968's Avatar
todd2968 todd2968 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1,690
iTrader: 8 / 100%
Default

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-GSRjW1gQ7F...enterprise.jpg


Join the Navy
__________________
NRA LIFE MEMBER
VFW LIFEMEMBER
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 09-06-2013, 10:51 PM
Brianguy's Avatar
Brianguy Brianguy is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 3,839
iTrader: 3 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by The War Wagon View Post
I think Starfleet has to approve your transfer, unless Capt. Kirk specifically requests you.

Wait... - what?
darn I was just going to make a trek reference. well played, sir
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 09-23-2013, 2:19 PM
stilly's Avatar
stilly stilly is online now
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Currently in a shanty I made in the river bottom by Eastvale.
Posts: 9,140
iTrader: 44 / 100%
Default

Thank you everyone for the help.

I was doing great with Banning USD until I got to the final interview and I think they passed me over because I had no VMware experience. I am going to be reading through this thread again and taking notes. I have latched on to VMware player and I am going to be playing around with it so that I can put it on my resume. Damn this sucks... At least I still have the internship with Rancho Cucamonga if the police ever return that background check...


Here is one. I took a HEMET USD test and well, I think it was an unfair test. That or they REALLY have no money. There were 78 questions, 27 were on networking/PCs, another 25 were on macs (NOT simple questions either), 1 was on behavior/personalities, and then about 25 on electronics WHAT? Whoever passes that test will be able to change out resistors and IC chips on a motherboard if needed...
__________________
`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves...

Need GOOD SS pins to clean your brass? Try the new and improved model...


Author of the NY Times Best Selling book: How to Cheat and Win Like a Pro at Solitare

Last edited by stilly; 09-23-2013 at 2:27 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 09-23-2013, 3:25 PM
d4v0s d4v0s is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Ventura
Posts: 1,626
iTrader: 5 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by stilly View Post
Thank you everyone for the help.

I was doing great with Banning USD until I got to the final interview and I think they passed me over because I had no VMware experience. I am going to be reading through this thread again and taking notes. I have latched on to VMware player and I am going to be playing around with it so that I can put it on my resume. Damn this sucks... At least I still have the internship with Rancho Cucamonga if the police ever return that background check...


Here is one. I took a HEMET USD test and well, I think it was an unfair test. That or they REALLY have no money. There were 78 questions, 27 were on networking/PCs, another 25 were on macs (NOT simple questions either), 1 was on behavior/personalities, and then about 25 on electronics WHAT? Whoever passes that test will be able to change out resistors and IC chips on a motherboard if needed...
Stilly,

School districts use out sourced tests and the person building it likely didn't know anything about technology. Also means that the Director of Technology didn't know squat either, or he/she would have written their own test.

Also, VMware player and VMware server are two very different beasts. It would be advantageous to download a free single license of ESXi and learn how to implement it fully in your own test environment. If you need a test server I am sure I can dig up an old dell poweredge for you.

I am lucky that I started with the USD here and worked my way up from the bottom, had I come in two years later I would have never gotten to push ESXi out, domain, file shares, scripts, gpos, and various other sso type configurations including a new firewall, sslvpn, and work order tracking server. That type of experience is kind of hard to learn without having a massive enterprise to mess around with.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 09-23-2013, 6:16 PM
skuehl skuehl is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chino Hills
Posts: 451
iTrader: 29 / 100%
Default

Take a totoally different approach. Dont go to an inteview to answer questions. let them do their thing. but at some point you need to be asking the questions. you need to do two things. ask the questons about thier business. you might not like the answers and dont want the job any way. the second thing is this.

preface

I have seen great people who cant even get a bad job. even though I know they are great and maybe even too good. and I have seen crappy candiidates who not only nail the interview, but get the job and on top of that get over paid. Now they eventually get fired. But still one of those bone heads is now currently getting YOUR job offer. :-).

Toward the end of the interview. Make up your mind if you want the Job 100%. if you do make the deisison not to leave the interview until you have the following.

Have the Job offer in your hand. (not likely)
understand what the interviewer does like about you.
understand what the interviewer DOESNT like about you.
if you cant change it move on.
Buit in most cases you can. So this is where you have to practice with a responsible friend. HAve people who know you come up with 20 reasons why they wouldn't hire you and be prepared to address it.

OBJECTION HANDLING.

know the next step in the interview process and after objextion handling get his/her commitment to move you to the next step of the hiring phase. Plain and Simple. Dont leave till they promise to recommend you. they might lie. but oh well you did what you could.

Get a book on objection handling.
Get a book on interviewing.
This is important. Get a book on what questions you should ask and get a book on what questions they should ask. you'll be more prepared. and if they ask crappy questions. well then you can recommend a book. or even say. Hey dont you want to ask me THIS.

I wish the best of luck.

The best candidate rarely gets the best job. unless of course your dad owns the company. LOL.

prepare prepare prepare.

Sorry about typos and grammar.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 09-23-2013, 6:52 PM
Cowboy T's Avatar
Cowboy T Cowboy T is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: PAULestine, USA
Posts: 3,793
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by stilly View Post
0o0o0o that is nice. That is what I was wanting to make too.

I have enough hardware to make some sort of servers. I am sure that with the 5+ computers that I have I can make something work. + Linux Untangle and other OSes I can grab.
You bet. Multiple OS's are a good thing. My first two computers ran NT Workstation 4.0 and NT Server 3.51. The third computer ran Caldera Linux 1.3, and the fourth ran Red Hat Linux 5.2. Shows you how far back this goes. :-)

Quote:
Originally Posted by stilly View Post
I actually have a Cisco Catalyst managed switch but I am not sure what it supports.
Depends on the specific model. All Catalyst 2900XL's, 2950's, and 3500XL's support 10/100, which is really all you need for this. If you have a Catalyst 3550, you can also do Layer 3 (i. e. routing) on it. All Catalyst switches support 802.1Q VLAN's.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stilly View Post
Cisco or Juniper router? How much does a business broadband account cost? Is that the T-3 for $1500 a month?
Nah, no need to pop for a T-3 or even a T-1. Cable modem, SDSL, or FiOS is just fine. I use a cable modem with static IP's.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stilly View Post
Why is it important to have a Cisco or Juniper router versus an all in one router/modem that I found on Amazon? This seems scaleable like you said and seems like a decent starting point. Why the need for two servers though? I was just going to make an untangle box and let it loose, but hmmm...
Reason: you'll get accustomed to the syntax and what you can do with those. Cisco and Juniper are the "big Daddies" in the enterprise routing space. Fortunately, a good Cisco 3700-series or Juniper 2900-series is not expensive, maybe a few hundred. Yes, you can also make a router with a PC running either GNU/Linux or OpenBSD. But that won't get past the HR "droids" who are simply searching for keywords.

Why two servers? No, I don't mean two servers. I meant a server and a workstation, but more than one server certainly doesn't hurt. You might choose to have one server for, say, Domain authentication, and another "member server" (I'm using Microsoft parlance here) for your file and print needs. This way you get a chance to learn the basic architecture for how we scale things in real enterprises. Any time I build a network, it's generally a small-scale version of the big stuff I work on. That's because you'll always need to account for growth. That's what my network at home taught me.

Then, when I got my first actual sysadmin job and had to build a Windows NT Server-based system, I did it with that experience in mind. That system scaled and continued to serve for 10 years with only minor tweaks. That organization to this day remembers my name in a favorable light, and it's been 17 years since I set it up. That's what you want.
__________________
"San Francisco Liberal With A Gun"
F***ing with people's heads, one gun show at a time. Hallelujah!
http://www.sanfranciscoliberalwithagun.com (reloading info w/ videos)
http://www.liberalsguncorner.com (podcast)
http://www.youtube.com/sfliberal (YouTube channel)
----------------------------------------------------
To be a true Liberal, you must be 100% pro-Second Amendment. Anything less is inconsistent with liberalism.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 09-23-2013, 10:31 PM
Fizz's Avatar
Fizz Fizz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: San Diego
Posts: 634
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Default

I work in Sorrento Mesa which is the heart of enterprise giant Qualcomm.

When I did OEM I sold their engineers machines all the time. Most of them wouldn't know a CPU socket from an outlet; absolute geniouses in their area of expertise though.

IMO, 'ENTERPRISE' to me means compartmentalized skillsets and high degrees of specialization. Nothing wrong with it. It's just not what I'd be in for.

I've always worked small business. I work for a small solutions provider that does Managed IT, VOIP (cloudpbx), Data center and ISP services. So, that's huge amounts of TCP/IP, Cisco/adtran/Sonicwall, Active Directory, etc. And combining them all all day every day.

I spent a good part of today fending off attacks from China (I won BTW). They were hitting some IADS with DNS requests, overloading the processing power of the boxes. The Requests were getting rejected by the firewall, but they were effectively DOSing the box. That encompassed everything from tier I customer service (listening to the client, figuring out out where the issue is) through network engineer skillsets. Any employer who can't appreciate that because of the business size isn't worth my time; I manage triple digit clients that are all over the county and some national accounts. If an employer can't see value in that in an enterprise environment I'm not going to sell myself short by molding myself to that expectation.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 09-26-2013, 3:18 PM
dchang0's Avatar
dchang0 dchang0 is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2,512
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Default

Fastest way for me to get into enterprise was to get a bunch of IBM certifications. If you know the material, then you merely have to take the tests and get the certificates--about $100 to $200 per test and a half-day of your time for each. If you don't know the material yet, you can take courses or study for them at home on your own, using readily-available guidebooks.

I jumped $20K in salary one year, just by getting my first enterprise-level cert. The other certs after that guaranteed me employment for years to come.

At the very least, if you are going to play with VMWare at home, is to get a certification guidebook and use that to direct your playing around. At least you'll be learning what they expect you to know, and if you do decide to take the test, you'll be ready for it.

One tip: get your hands on as many practice tests as you can. Use them to gauge your learning progress. Save one test for the end, just before going to take the real test. If you can get a 70% or higher on that final practice test, you'll pass the real test.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 09-26-2013, 3:28 PM
PolishMike's Avatar
PolishMike PolishMike is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Tracy
Posts: 5,686
iTrader: 24 / 96%
Default

I think you are way over reaching IMO.
How are you wanting to get "enterprise" experience when you dont even have VMware exp? You are putting the cart before the horse..
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 09-26-2013, 9:17 PM
Deadbolt's Avatar
Deadbolt Deadbolt is offline
CGSSA Associate
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 6,590
iTrader: 3 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PolishMike View Post
I think you are way over reaching IMO.
How are you wanting to get "enterprise" experience when you dont even have VMware exp? You are putting the cart before the horse..
clown question bro.
__________________
Just another Boy and His Dog.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 09-27-2013, 7:34 AM
NoSpam's Avatar
NoSpam NoSpam is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: SGV
Posts: 700
iTrader: 7 / 100%
Default

Stonith offered a lot of good advice. You can build your own virtual lab and set up a domain, The main problem I see with trying to learn enterprise is the lack of a user base to support. You won't get that experience until you're actually dealing with live issues. Helpdesk is the place to start. Companies these days do not offer much training, if any. You're lucky if they even take the time to thoroughly explain their own processes and procedures.

A common interview question for an enterprise level helpdesk position is: What would you do if a user reports they can't log onto the network? After they enter their password, they get an error that says "there are no domain controllers available". Someone with only SOHO experience will probably not know the answer.

IT is an interesting field. It's filled with a lot of intelligent control-freak douchebags that lack social/interpersonal skills. But don't let that fool you; deep down, they're real *****s. Actually, I've worked with a lot of great people all over the world in my 10+ years...from many states here in the US, to Canada, Mexico, Central and South America, Puerto Rico, UK, and Asia Pacific. My few small-scale enterprise jobs sucked in comparison...less teamwork, less organization, less structure, no ITIL. Job security is more dependent on hoarding info and resources vs. the redundancy of the enterprise model

You get to wear more hats and control more aspects of the environment in a SOHO, but you know how absolute power corrupts absolutely. You will gain more experience and expertise in enterprise for the simple fact you'll have more IT people to learn from and bounce ideas off of. You'll be constantly challenged to be more accountable. Sure you end up specializing more, but that's where the money is....a jack of all trades (and master of none) are a dime-a-dozen in IT. You can move Jack's job to another country for 1/3rd the salary, or have 3 people replace him. Don't be Jack.

Last edited by NoSpam; 09-27-2013 at 7:37 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 09-27-2013, 11:18 AM
d4v0s d4v0s is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Ventura
Posts: 1,626
iTrader: 5 / 100%
Default

[QUOTE=Don't be Jack.[/QUOTE]

Semantics possibly, but remember that jack of all trades and master of none implies a typical joe schmoe that doesnt really know anything and just has the outlook of "well I can google anything and I am really good at reading forums".

I dont hire jacks, if you have to read a forum and hope that your issue is exactly the same as someone else in the cosmos, then I am essentially paying you for nothing.

Subject matter experts, can sometimes be jacks of all trades and masters of a few. Because on the flip side I do not like to hire "specialists" with narrow views of the world. I have worked with many "specialists" that knew their field very well and utterly failed to be any help because they only knew cisco... Understanding the very concepts of networking for example should allow someone to configure cisco, hp, 3com or any other opposing switch. 3com likes tag/untagged, where as others may specify a trunk or access port.

We should all shoot for being well rounded in our fundamentals, and as NoSpam said, we should also specialize or become experts in a few fields. Your area of expertise should be in what you love to do, or what makes you the most money.

I am only an expert in two fields, networking and scripting. Everything else is just a solid understanding of the fundamentals needed to operate computer systems.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 09-29-2013, 4:51 AM
dchang0's Avatar
dchang0 dchang0 is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2,512
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Default

I disagree that jacks of all trades aren't as valuable. Let's call them by their proper descriptor: generalists. Now, generalists can be VERY valuable and useful if they possess business/management/people-skills. In other words, if some of the trades they are jacks of are on the people-skill or revenue-generating side of things, then all of a sudden, these generalist IT guys are worth a whole lot.

Generalists are also valuable because they can reach across responsibilities. Like d4v0s said, we don't like guys who "only work on Cisco" and won't or can't help in any other specialty or area of responsibility.

Another thing I really like to see is vertical experience. It's great to have a server admin who rose up from desktop tech, because he/she will understand the users' perspective better and not pull as many dick ivory-tower top-down "we're gonna convert all 3000 PCs in the hospital in one weekend" moves. It's also great to have a software developer with level 1 tech support skills because they understand how their bugs hit the users hard.

"Walk a mile in the other's shoes" kind of stuff.

---

I also disagree that a good Googler isn't valuable. Look at it this way: if I have to pay a guy for two hours of work to figure out on his own something that's already been figured out by somebody else in the world, or if I can pay the guy for five minutes to Google the answer and move on to the next problem, I'd rather pay the guy with the good Google-fu to get it done fast and get on with it.

Less time spent on a ticket = more tickets closed per day.

Yeah, we don't want a guy whose only or primary skill is Googling. But I consider strong Google skills a must-have in all my hires. I also consider "political courage" a must-have, and my best hire in my entire career so far was decided not on technical skills but on political and ethical courage. I literally asked questions like: "were you ever in a position where you had to speak up to defend a colleague to your manager, and what did you do in that situation?"

That hire ended up replacing me as team lead so that I could go to another team, and he led the company's huge website upgrade project successfully on his own, pushing back on upper management when appropriate and driving the project through all obstacles.

In short, again, people-skills are still more valuable than IT skills. It's good to be that kind of generalist.

Last edited by dchang0; 09-29-2013 at 4:56 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 09-29-2013, 3:58 PM
stilly's Avatar
stilly stilly is online now
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Currently in a shanty I made in the river bottom by Eastvale.
Posts: 9,140
iTrader: 44 / 100%
Default

https://my.vmware.com/web/vmware/eva...xi5&lp=default

I think my main problem is that I have let my customers/clients dictate where I go for learning new things and anything ENTERPRISEY has always been expensive for me in the past so I have naturally stayed away from them. But I think this VMware and ESXI is a solid step in the right direction.

My Cisco Catalyst is a Cisco WS-C2912-XL-EN Catalyst 2900 Series Switch.

Hopefully tonight I can have some VMware stuff going. I will start looking for tests and tutorials/stuff so that I can actually learn something.
__________________
`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves...

Need GOOD SS pins to clean your brass? Try the new and improved model...


Author of the NY Times Best Selling book: How to Cheat and Win Like a Pro at Solitare
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:29 PM.




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Proudly hosted by GeoVario the Premier 2A host.
Calguns.net, the 'Calguns' name and all associated variants and logos are ® Trademark and © Copyright 2002-2016, Calguns.net an Incorporated Company All Rights Reserved.