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  #1  
Old 01-27-2012, 5:40 PM
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Default CalGuns Swiss Rifle Central

Guys, I'll ask that you not post on this thread until it's complete. Kestryll is going to make this a sticky thread for most all of the Swiss rifles info I can list here. You won't have to go anywhere else to get your basic information.

We'll post a seperate Q&A thread a little later. In the meantime, I'll be adding info to this one over the next few days.
So here we go. I've added a few inserts for the current changes in equipment.

Recommended setup for reloading the 7.5x55 Swiss

A press, Forster (recommended) RCBS Rock Chucker or Dillon 550B
(If its RCBS get the Primer Option)
Dies for your caliber (RCBS, Redding, Hornady etc.)
Spray lubricant and case neck brush, or
Castor Oil (recommended)

Wooden or plastic case block to hold 50 cases
Powder Dispenser (RCBS)
Powder scale
Case mouth Funnel
Powder Trickler
Manual Case Trimmer with collet for your caliber. Wilson (recommended)
or RCBS.

Reamer/Champfer for case mouths
Calipers to measure case lengths
Powder and Primers.
Sierra Reloading Manual (recommended)

If you shoot very much you really do need a Case Tumbler.
Dillon or Lyman are the best.
Case tumbler medium, walnut preferred.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm posting this here so it's easier for me to find and access when I send it to the ones who email asking about this.
I'm also going to add to what Dad had originally since I'm getting deeper into this all now with the zfk55.
Added: Keep in mind that new equipment, powders, primers and technology have appeared since this was originally written.
You have to apply this logically keeping in mind that there are new innovations since this was written.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
From my Father:



My "platform" is the basis upon which all of my load data begins, and it's NOT that hard. You can analyze, illustrate, debate and tweak till the cows come home but it all ends with one single base. Your case preparation.

My credentials? 42 years of reloading and 32 of those devoted to the 7.5 Swiss cartridge. Load data of mine that was in use long before the manuals figured out that their own data was erroneous and based on the wrong rifle. Do I have any magic? Absolutely not. Is there anything mysterious or technically difficult to understand about how I do it? Absolutely not. Have I varied one iota from my original "platform" in case preparation? Absolutely not.... and yet I see a supposed mystique surrounding the reloading for this cartridge evoking all kinds of semi confusing answers that are completely unnecessary.

I won't argue with anyone about presses or dies. This is what works for me, take it or leave it. Want to use a different press or die set? Go for it. After all these years and many thousands of successful rounds downrange, I'm not changing anything, however, advances in technology may now dictate other wise to you.

A) Whatever kind of press you have, using Redding Comp, RCBS dies or your own choice, run the ram all the way up. Turn your sizing/decapping die all the way down against the shellholder. Lower the ram and turn the die down another 1/2 turn or so, maybe even less, but make sure that when you run the ram back up the ram "cams over" at the top of the stroke. This is "full length sizing". I don't want to hear about all of the variables in die setting possibilities with all of the other cartridges you use. For the 7.5 Swiss, make your press cam-over at the top of the stroke to begin. Find a better way for youself later? Why not.
Neck sizing? Forget it. After very few times fired in a k31 your case won't be chambering anyway. Even if you do neck size, your case will have to be hand-fed into the chamber and indexed to exactly the same "o'clock" position every time to be effective. Not all k31 chambers are identical. I do it with a few of my commercial rifles with some success. 7.5 Swiss? Forget it. Its an exercise in futility that won't shade my loads anyway, and there are at least two local k31 owners that are now believers.
I've used a myriad of presses, both fixed and progressive over the years and the RCBS Rockchucker was my mainstay for load data development until the Dillon 550B came along. We now use a Forster almost exclusively for precision reloading.
Though I have a spread of other mfg's dies, Redding comp is all I use for the 7.5 Swiss. I currently have 6 sets of RCBS as well.

B) Set your decapper to the proper depth allowing just a bit of the tip to appear through the bottom of the shellholder. Screw it in too deeply and you'll bend the shaft and ruin a case. Lock the die into place.

1) Use a case tumbler or a washing machine to get your brass clean. If its a washing machine, put all the brass in a pillowcase, tie the top and wash them in hot water with a good dishwashing soap. Shake all the water out and let them dry overnight on a towel.

2) TTL.... Trim To Length. Our spec will be 2.179 or less. I suggest you don't trim much shorter than 2.160.
Ream and champfer the case mouths. If you don't have that little tool, buy one.

3) Lubing: Use a case lube/pad combo or the new sprays which I consider superior. Plain old Castor Oil works great too (Now preferred). If its a pad, use your fingers to spread the lube evenly over the surface of the pad and roll the cases completely. Use your finger and tip the case mouth down and roll that too. Don't get lube on the shoulders. This type of lube is non-compressible and can dent your case shoulders upon sizing. Use a mouth brush to get inside, but use it sparingly.
Spray: Using a cookie sheet, line it with aluminum foil and lay your cases down on their sides with all the mouths facing toward you. Holding the can at a 45 degree angle, spray from the rear of the cases toward the mouth allowing spray to enter the case mouths. Using the flat of your hand, roll the cases around and hit the case mouths once more very lightly. If it's to be Castor Oil, use it sparingly. It goes a long way.
Spray lube and Castor Oil are not of the non-compressible variety so you won't have a problem with the case shoulders as long as you don't overdo it..

4) Lightly coat the inside of your die with spray lube. Do NOT do this with paste lube. Put a case in the shell holder and run it up firmly but gently. If you feel any resistance, STOP! Lower the ram and check the depth of your decapper. Check to make sure the inside your die was actually polished at the factory. This is not at all unheard of. I've gotten 3 of these over the years and they will not allow you to run the case in.

Assuming your ram cammed-over at the top of the stroke, you should now have a properly sized case that will chamber without any resistance in your chamber.
Have to hit your bolthandle with the palm of your hand to get it to chamber? Projectile seating aside, it won't be because you didn't size your case correctly.
I've read plenty of rationale on chambering, and (without telling you how many Swiss rifles I have) None of mine chamber other than smoothly and easily, without rapping.

5) Clean your primer pockets with the appropriate tool. I use the small, formed wire brush in a plastic handle meant for this procedure. Seat your primers dead flush with the case base.

6) Projectile seating: It is not at all necessary to crimp for the 7.5 Swiss rifles. Crimping introduces a variable that you don't need. The grip of the case mouth on the bullet will not be identical every single time, thus, the unwanted variable.
To determine proper seat depth for any given projectile, keep in mind that the measurement is only valid when the contact of the bullet's ogive and the lands/grooves is determined.
Your manual says OAL is 3.020?... maybe for that bullet that they used, but only for that bullet profile, not all others. Projectile profiles vary from mfg to mfg. So how do you do it?

There are any number of ways, but I've always used the same methodology. Take a sized, empty and unprimed, uncharged case, start a bullet into the case mouth leaving it protruding further than is apparently correct. Place it in the rifle's chamber by hand, ease the bolt into full battery and "smartly" eject it. Measure that OAL and seat it 2 to 4 thousandths deeper. This is a good start. Later, when you've become more deeply involved in data gathering, you may want to play with seat depths to find the sweet spot for your cartridge. I have specifics I use regularly. Bear in mind that the k31 has a short throat, and the k31 typically prefers the ogive very close to the lands.

Yes, there are other ways. If you like your way better .......use it.
Once you determine your chambered OAL for that bullet, screw your seating die down until the mouth of an empty case stops the descent and back it out a full turn. Lock the die in place and back out the seater.

That method is only going to work for one bullet profile, and it its a hollow point its not going to be accurate anway since not all meplats are the same even in the same box. Your bullet seater should be indexed behind the tip ahead of the ogive, not on the tip of the bullet. A Sierra 175 MK is not going to be the same as a Berger 175 VLD at all. Both should index on an area ahead of the ogive, but not all ogives are the same distance from either the case mouth or the bullet tip. If you use just the tip you're going to have two completely different freebores for the same caliber, weight and charge with likely two different results.

Now measure it and decide how far off the lands you want to begin. Note that figure and begin working out your load, adjusting seat depth as you go. But remember that was only for that bullet profile. Change profiles and you're back to square one.

Find load data that might be in a trusted manual or proven data from the board. Always begin with a lesser load even if the data you find "appears" to be proven.

"Stand up and shoot it like a man!"
Only if Jeff Cooper is watching, otherwise use a bench rest when developing your load data. Use the same rest or bagging methodology every time you shoot. Remove all variables from your data gathering..... and that's the secret, gents. Consistency. Consistency.

Ok, the final step I consider important if you're striving to squeeze every ounce of accuracy out of your Swiss rifles is.............. www.swissrifles.com/sr/pierre/accurizing.html

Does it work? You'd have to ask those who have used the methodology, and there are a lot of them now. I have read a few comments about how it "didn't work for me. A waste of time". It probably was, for those folks. They didn't follow the process correctly and most likely were shooting unproven loads with improperly sized cases or stocks with an unnoticed, inherent problem. All of my rifles are accurized, and every one of them improved forthwith.

To wrap this up, I advise that you remove every single variable that you can think of. When reloading, never vary from your case prep (hopefully successful) formula. When shooting for load data, never vary from your shooting stance/position. Record results from every single target you print. Be careful and I wish you success.

P

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

There are a lot of ways to get to the same positive end result. This is one that worked for him, and it works for me with Swiss Rifles. If you find better ways, use them, but be careful. Use manufacturers books and read the cautions and limits.
I should add that we now use Redding Competition bushing dies for almost everything including 7.5 Swiss.
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Last edited by Latigo; 01-27-2012 at 8:24 PM..
  #2  
Old 01-27-2012, 5:43 PM
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Default Projectile prep for reloaders

Anything out to 200 we won't necessarily do this, but beyond that range we would.

This is our process. Your's may vary, but this has proven itself for us.

Projectile prep:

We only use Berger VLDs, but Sierra SMKs work really great too.
Our method is to begin with meplat trimming. We use the Hoover. Buy the sort that indexes on the ogive, not the base of the bullet. That's going to be very important when you cross reference/compare actual seat depth from the ogive to COAL, cartridge to cartridge later.

Untrimmed



Trimming process.



Trimmed



We then use a Hoover Pointer to reshape and center the hollow point and we taper it down to an opening that's approximately twice the thickness of the jacket wall.

Pointing





Pointed correctly



This is only the beginning of our overall case/projectile prep process.
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  #3  
Old 01-27-2012, 5:47 PM
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Default

Case Prep
-----------------------------------------------------
The first step is lubing, and we use Castor Oil. Yeah, I inow. There are many hundreds of threads and thousands of posts all over the net about "the" best lube. Want to waste your money? Go for it. None of them beat Castor Oil. Its cheap and takes no more than 3 drops to do 100 cases. We line a shallow baking pan with foil, a few drops of Castor Oil, roll them around a couple of times and that's it. This is just for a demo. We ususally do 100 at a time.



We use a side bench mounted neck lube brush that has a miniscule amount of Castor Oil on the bristles applied with fingers.

Resize and de-cap the primer, then...... remove the expander rod. Resize with a bushing die of the right diameter. We have a seperate press for each process, but if you don't you'll need to go through the sizing process twice, once with the Expander/De-capper and once with the bushing die. We use Redding Micro's for both processes.



A quick wipe.............


And on to the Wilson Trimmer. Use what works for you, but whatever it is, be certain that there is not one iota of variance case to case.



Continued
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Last edited by Latigo; 03-03-2012 at 6:18 AM..
  #4  
Old 01-27-2012, 5:48 PM
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Default Continued



Ream and Champfer gently. There's no need to be aggressive with the brass.




Insert primers. For this process we use the Forster and it's be dedicated to two processes, one of which is primer seating.


I've purposely ignored primer pocket truing and I'll explain why later.
For projectile seating we use the Redding Micro and that, for us, is critical.


We have electronics, but for precision reloading we use a very long I beam scale.

Next will come seat depths and primer pocket truing.
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Last edited by Latigo; 03-03-2012 at 6:25 AM..
  #5  
Old 01-27-2012, 5:52 PM
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The k31 and it's mates, the 96/11, 1911, k11 and the rare (in the US) zfk55 Swiss Sniper Rifle are a rarity in another category. A Military series of rifles rifles designed around a specific cartridge for accuracy and performance. All use the same original GP11 cartridge.

The intent of this cartridge/rifle mating was to hit a human in the kill zone at range and they performed as intended. Not many production rifles are capable of doing that at real range. The very great majority of these rifles perform exactly as intended.

Are there rifles that outperform it? Of course there are, but none of them are a standard military issue firearm designed around a dedicated production cartridge for that rifle.

The purpose of this missive is to illustrate that there are differences between issue rifles and custom made and custom tuned rifles.
P.W. St.Marie
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Last edited by Latigo; 05-01-2012 at 11:49 AM..
  #6  
Old 01-27-2012, 5:54 PM
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Default Waffenfett, or Swiss grease

Written by Guisan:

The grease is used for three purposes being cleaning, lubricating and protecting and the last can be divided in normal use and storage.

To start with the cleaning first, before shooting the Swiss run a pad through the bore to clean out the grease there and from the bolt face, they do that with the help of a grease rod, that ones comes with a jag for a pad and a black grease brush.
Immediately after shooting they run that black brush with Automatenfett through the still hot bore, put some grease on the bolt face and leave it like that. After they get home they clean it all from the grease, get a bore rope or cleaning brush through the bore and after that they lube it all again with fresh grease that stays on till the next shooting match.
The grease dissolves the fouling and makes cleaning way more easy as using oil.

Lubricating during normal use is only done on few spots, the most important ones are the flat (or round with the older straight pulls) inside receiver sliding part of the operating rod and the tip of the operating rod where it enters the bolt sleeve groove, that area needs to be lubed well.
There should be no grease inside the bolt or at the outside but it won't hurt to use a tiny bit in the locking nut area.
Do not use too much grease, the manual reads for the K31 "battle lubricating"......NONE , so the above is only to make your rifle operate more smoothly with less wear, after all the shooting range is no battle field.

The protecting part is easy, Automatenfett can be used on bare metal to protect it against corrosion, use it limited especially on moving parts as we don't want sand to stick to these.

For storage, the -"Parkdienstschmierung" as they say there- it's easy also;
Barrel inside and outside, greased
Chamber, greased
Trigger assembly, inside bolt and hammer piece, NO grease (still the arsenals did not follow that rule that well as examples show)
Bare metal parts, greased
Blued parts, greased

The storage part is the reason why so many new owners of K31's in the USA think that they are in Cosmoline which is not the case, when they have been in storage in Swiss arsenals for a long time they are still well protected by the old yellow Waffenfett, the more recent ones are well protected by black Automatenfett.

================================================== =============================

So your rifle came to you in the usual condition of the k31. Stock a bit beat up but with most of the metal finish intact and sharp, shiney lands and grooves, and you intend to keep it that way.
Stop and think about this. The rifle came to you in the condition in which the Swiss soldier and Armoury kept it for many years. Is it not then a reasonable assumption that you'd follow the same maintenance ritual that has kept it in that condition for so many years? Maybe, but the average American shooter believes strongly in all of the advertising hype and testimonials to a myriad of maintenance products deemed absolutely necessary to keep a rifle as pristine as possible, few of which are factually relevant to the k31 barrel.

This was written by my Dad quite a few years ago.

------------------------------------------------------------------



The Armoury and the well instructed Swiss soldier used a product called Waffenfett, or weapon grease. A close and reasonable approximation in the US is Lubriplate 930. The barrel is swabbed with 930, running a patch back and forth followed by a dry patch. At the end of the shooting session while the barrel is still hot or warm, the lubriplate is worked back into the barrel and left that way until the next shooting session when a dry patch is run back through removing the excess lubriplate. That's it. If carbon in the throat and chamber become an issue from firing reloads, use a good carbon remover such as Montana Extreme, but leave the bore alone. It is a fact that excessive bore cleaning with brushes can and will shorten your barrel life.

If, by shooting reloaded cartridges utilizing copper jacketed projectiles, your bore shows copper fouling, use a product such as WipeOut to remove it. This kind of a product fulfills it's task without continual scrubbing of the bore.

This may sound like an overly simple approach, and the typical US shooter is usually a ready recipient of industry marketing efforts and barrel maintenance, but use this logic. My 50+ year old rifle came to me with a truly amazing bore. Why would I not then follow the maintenance practices of the Armoury and Soldier that delivered it to me in this condition?
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Last edited by Latigo; 02-25-2012 at 9:04 AM..
  #7  
Old 02-07-2012, 5:23 PM
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Default

k31 misfires?? Light primer strikes?

This will clarify.


Q. My rifle misfires frequently. The primer is dented only slightly or not at all. Why?

A. Some folks aren't aware that the Swiss straight-pull rifles often won't fire if the bolt isn't fully closed before pulling the trigger.

The symptoms are always the same: "the primer was lightly indented but didn't fire." Sometimes this is followed by "I know the bolt was closed because I checked after the misfire."

When the striker falls, a shoulder on it hits a projection on the operating rod -



If the operating rod isn't all the way forward, the energy of the mainspring tries to push it the rest of the way. If there isn't any abnormal resistance, it will usually succeed - simultaneously rotating the bolt sleeve to the fully locked position by the action of the middle section of this same projection on the sleeve's cam slot.

Since all this pushing and rotating uses up a good part of the energy stored in the mainspring, often there isn't enough left to fire the primer. The result? "The primer was dented but didn't fire. I know the bolt was closed because I checked after. . ."

If you're having this kind of problem, try checking before pulling the trigger. With the K31, it's easy to see if the bolt is closed by looking at the serial number on the sleeve -



If that number is not at the 12 o'clock position, the bolt is definitely not closed and a misfire is likely. When you're in shooting position, cheek on the comb, concentrating on the sights, you can't see any of this and it feels like the handle is all the way home. On the 1889 and 1911 actions, the serial number doesn't rotate, but you can still check to see if the operating rod is fully forward.

With factory ammunition or good handloads this kind of misfire seldom occurs because the incremental force needed for that last 1/2 inch of op rod travel (when the extractor has to snap over the rim and the final compression of the mainspring occurs) is very small. The momentum of your arm and the bolt does the job easily.

Cases insufficiently resized and bullets seated too long are the usual reasons for enough added resistance to cause a whole string of these "rifle" malfunctions.

When setting up a resizing die, one of the essential measuring tools is your rifle. Try a sized case in the chamber, with the striker on "half-safe" position (45 degrees) to take the mainspring out of the equation. If the bolt won't cam shut fairly easily (serial at 12:00), you need to screw your die in a little more and try again. Then try it with another case or two just to make sure everything is repeatable.

Your rifle is also a necessary tool when setting up the seater die. Here are two 150 grain bullets seated for firm contact with the lands in the same K31 -



The upper bullet is a Winchester FMJBT with a sharper ogive than the Sierra HPBT below. If I told you the overall length for a 150 grain spitzer should be 2.995" and you used that length for the Sierra, your loaded rounds would be about .070" too long because 2.995" is correct only for the Winchester. Furthermore, it is only "correct" in my individual rifle, with this particular lot of bullets!

By Parashooter
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  #8  
Old 02-18-2012, 10:33 AM
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Default Impact coating for your barrel in winter

We've already covered how to prolong your Swiss rifle barrel, but how do you accomplish that in winter when you have no direct, intense sunlight?
Well, we ran out of ICPs this morning and we're doing the process right now.

With a heqvy tripod and a halogen lamp, you can get the same ICP results. Be very careful on the height of the lamp above your vibrator! Too close to your vibrator can soften and even melt the top. The top should be very hot to the touch, but not so hot that you can't hold your palm on it for 4 or 5 seconds.
The process will take 3 hours with a mid-time pause to rotate your jars 180 degrees.

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  #9  
Old 02-20-2012, 7:06 AM
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Default Buying a zfk55.

Just a bit of advice about these rifles and particularly those already in the US and on various auction sites.
Gents, just being a rare rifle doesn't give it an automatic NRA VG to XLNT. These rifles were issued and used actively by squad designated marksmen. The earlier the year, the more liklihood that the rifle has seen a lot of use.

The majority seem to be in truly great condition, but the exterior appearances don't necessarily mean that the rifle is in it's as-issued condition.
There are those both here and abroad that are very good at finishing as original. A usual tip-off is the edges of the finger grooves being slightly rounded and the rather crude checkering being either slightly flattened or too good, meaning a veining chisel was used to refurbish.

If you have a doubt about the year, go find the Mfg. date by the serial number. Go to the CalGuns Swiss Rifles thread at the top of this page.
Detailed photos are an absolute must for a $2,000 to $5,000 rifle. Post your phtos here where we can scrutinize them. A solid seller won't hesitate to supply any and all info on an expensive rifle like the zfk55. They're incredible shooters, but don't let the rarity sway your purchse decision.

The most postive way to be assured of a zfk55 being exactly what you expect is to get it straight from Switzerland..... and yes, I do have a solid contact in Switzerland whose opinions and prices are always dead on.
This link will help cover a lot of questions.

http://theswissriflesdotcommessagebo...-Sniper-Rifles
Be careful.
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  #10  
Old 02-21-2012, 6:16 AM
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Default Spare Parts Still in the USA

For the moment anyway.

https://www.libertytreecollectors.co...?idCategory=18
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  #11  
Old 03-09-2012, 3:39 PM
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Default the zfk55 Maintenance Manual in English

http://www.swissrifles.com/sr/manual...Manual_Eng.pdf
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  #12  
Old 03-25-2012, 3:47 PM
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Typical shooting range sound deadening system for areas of Switzerland that are surrounded by homes or businesses.



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  #13  
Old 04-01-2012, 9:29 AM
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Why such a narrow scope rail for the K31?

If you try converting to a Weaver mount, the k31 ejecting straigt up will allow the case to hit the Weaver rail and/or Scope and drop right back into the receiver. Further, it will skin your knuckles on the right side when cycling the bolt.
The SP rail is Mfg'd the way it is for a reason. Clearance, and I know all about the mount that is a Drill/Tap on to of the receiver. We've made them here too as prototypes, but our philosophy is that if we design something that will not function 100% of the time, we're not going to produce it.

These photos were put together by Guisan showing the function of our mounts.











And, no............ your POI change will not be discernable between 100 and 300 yards if you zero the rifle at 100 yards. The offset is not enough for a good shooter to see any marked difference. At 400 and 500 yards you will still be in a heart kill-zone on game. .................. etc.
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An'' ole' Brer' Rabbit...... he set in de bushes..... he watch an' he wait... lay low an' he don' say nuffin'.

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  #14  
Old 04-08-2012, 11:43 AM
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Default Diopters

This is the production model.





The Diopter clamps to the right side of the ejection port requiring no alteration to the rifle. It comes complete with front sight.

It shoots from 75 yards to 1,000+ yards. It's eye relief adjustable at two points on the rail.
It has a Patent Applied For internal double buffer spring system to give it smooth travel the full elevation travel.

This is the Distinguished Naval Marksman who proofed and published the report on the the prototype at Quantico.



This is production model #1 Type P/S Diopter in it's presentation case dedicated to him.





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An'' ole' Brer' Rabbit...... he set in de bushes..... he watch an' he wait... lay low an' he don' say nuffin'.

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  #15  
Old 04-08-2012, 1:08 PM
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Default Sighting in a Diopter.

Sighting in a diopter set

Pre-sight in:
1) Make sure rifle is unloaded.
2) Install diopter set properly on to the rifle. Make sure all the diopter screws are tight.
3) Loosen both action screws and both barrel band screws.
4) Hold rifle vertically with its butt plate against the ground, grab barrel and push towards butt.
5) Tighten front action screw first, then tang screw. Back off tang screw slightly.
6) Tighten front barrel band. Barrel should be centered in stock.
7) Tighten sling barrel band only enough so that the spring dtente can still be moved when you press on it.

Sight in:
1) Get into shooting position with unloaded rifle. Everything you will need to shoot should be within arms reach.
Do not get up or move your elbows too much.
2) Find the best place for your cheek on the stock. You should be fairly close to the safety ring. I use my thumb
as a spacer between the ring and my nose to get the same cheek position time after time. I of course lower my
thumb before firing.
3) Center the front sight hood in rear sight. Should have equal amount of space all around the outside of the front side hood
4) Aim at target, center it in the middle of your front sight ring or on top of the front sight post with a slight gap
between the top of the post and the bottom of the target.
5) You should always be focusing on the front sight, not the target.
6) Dry fire a couple times.
7) Move to the third smallest hole available on the rear diopter sight.
8 ) See how sharp the front post or aperture is.
9) Compare the sharpness of the front sight using smaller and larger rear diopter hole sizes. Look for the clearest
possible setting for the light conditions you have that day.
10) Now you can load the rifle! I just saved you a lot of money in ammo.
11) Keep a sheet of paper and a pencil handy. Keep track of every shot.
12) First shot is a fouler. Write:"1- F", and its clock position.
13) Fire three more shots and write down their clock positions.
14) Estimate where the center of shots 2, 3 and 4 is and correct accordingly. Remember each click is MOA.
15) Repeat from 13 until youre sighted in.

Notes: All of the following are more noticeable as the shooting distance increases.
1) Expect your point of impact to change during the course of the day as the sun changes it position relative to the target.
2) If you change aperture size after sight-in, you most likely will have re-sight it again.
3) Changes in cheek position WILL affect your sighting.
4) Changes in body positions WILL affect you sighting.
5) Do not mix ammo, I always try to use the same lot of ammo in a session, even with GP11.


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An'' ole' Brer' Rabbit...... he set in de bushes..... he watch an' he wait... lay low an' he don' say nuffin'.

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  #16  
Old 04-15-2012, 1:08 PM
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Default Sanctioned Swiss Meet Targets

The table is a 40" x 8' table.











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An'' ole' Brer' Rabbit...... he set in de bushes..... he watch an' he wait... lay low an' he don' say nuffin'.

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  #17  
Old 05-05-2012, 8:44 AM
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Default

Front sight blades? If your rifle is shooting high right out of the gate, this is the solution.



From left to right is lowest to tallest and the middle one is a standard height.
Heights are 5.9, 6.2, 6.5 (standard), 6.8 and 7.1 mm. Changing out a blade by one step moves the POI at 300 meters by 7" (18cm) for a K11 and 6.3" (16cm) for a K31.

The lower row are the normal 1.8mm wide blades, the other rows are the wider ones as used for the senior shooters and for the ZfK55.

Guisan.
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Last edited by Latigo; 05-05-2012 at 8:49 AM..
  #18  
Old 05-05-2012, 9:38 AM
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Default

Sight Pictures, Swiss rifles courtesy of Guisan!



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An'' ole' Brer' Rabbit...... he set in de bushes..... he watch an' he wait... lay low an' he don' say nuffin'.

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Last edited by Latigo; 11-08-2012 at 8:29 AM..
  #19  
Old 11-08-2012, 8:28 AM
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Default

We manufacture brakes. (Note: We don't selll to the public, only through our distributors)
This is a threaded brake. Note the thickness of the Brake wall.





This is a Clamp On Brake



Installed




This is a Damper for reducing group size.



Installed




This is a flash suppressor. A Brennan Nil-Flash that shows zero signature on an ar15 type.
We did the prototype testing on this brake in Lost Prairie during the early 90's.



They're not a brake, and a flash suppressor (combo) is never an efficient brake.

4 years of field testing our own products before production and distribution has proven this over and over ad nauseum.
The chances of any brake reducing group sizes is low and purely co-incidental, however, we have had a few reports of the threaded brake making a difference. This is an involved subject and I'd post it if requested, otherwise what I've given you is based on a very long history of manufacturing, R&D and field testing on both Brakes and Dampers. Essentially, a true, effective Brake must be thick walled right out of the gate. The rearward angle of the ports must have sufficient surface upon which the gases can act. Without that angle and thickness you'd have no forward push on the rifle. Look closely at your zfk55 or AMT, and you'll understand.
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An'' ole' Brer' Rabbit...... he set in de bushes..... he watch an' he wait... lay low an' he don' say nuffin'.

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  #20  
Old 10-21-2013, 6:21 PM
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Default Courtesy of Guisan!



















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An'' ole' Brer' Rabbit...... he set in de bushes..... he watch an' he wait... lay low an' he don' say nuffin'.

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  #21  
Old 10-21-2013, 6:24 PM
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