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Old 01-13-2013, 6:41 AM
Wrangler John Wrangler John is offline
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Yawn! Another wonder lube. Over the 51 years I have been shooting, loading and just about doing everything firearms related, a new lube or bore cleaner or some other miracle product has come along every few months. All natural this and synthetic that. Greases, oils, and graphitic compounds of great complexity, said to be the cat's meow. There was Ten-X a colliodial graphite suspension popular in the 1970's that was swabbed through bores and allowed to dry, or used as a release agent in bullet molds. Maybe, but the effect was minimal.

On and on it went, Dri-Slide came around sometime in the 1960's and was quite the thing during Viet Nam. The early M-16's had a problem with jamming, and no forward assist in the early iterations, the military issued lubes were part of the problem, so family members sent the G.I.'s care packages of the stuff that worked. http://www.uniquetek.com/site/696296/product/T1247

Then there was the Teflon laced stuff. Teflon is great for thread seal tape, although not as reliable as monkey snot (Rector Seal #5), and it's equally good for frying pans and muffin pans, but has draw backs in firearms if not formulated properly.

Then we discovered molybdenum disulphide, great stuff except that it attracts moisture, becomes acidic, and rusts steel, so it needs a companion rust inhibitor. Used as a bullet coating the stuff builds up in the throat as a hellacious carbon ring that is difficult to remove and left in the bore in humid places causes more pitting than smallpox.

So, some folks use WD-40, the main ingredient of which is plain old Stoddard Solvent, or naphtha. Which means that it would be cheaper to use kerosene as the paraffin content remains after the volatiles evaporate. Petroleum solvents do that, leave behind a residue of lubrication, which is probably why Jewel Triggers recommends dousing their triggers in lighter fluid (Ronsonol for the Zippo lighter not the barbecue stuff).

Now we are paying homage to hexagonal boron nitride (HBN), super slick and pressure resistant, it has become the new darling of the lube and bullet coating fans. I am now experimenting with it as a bullet coating. Naturally some folks decided to mix HBN, Teflon and molybdenum disulphide together in a non-toxic grease carrier. One such product line is found at http://rydol.com/products/firearms/index.htm. I gotta say the little 1 oz jar of the grease I bought from J.P. Enterprises really slicked up my new upper BCG. Stuff makes it feel like a well honed old Mauser bolt, it glides effortlessly with only a miniscule dab. I like stuff you apply with a toothpick, like a jeweler lubing a fine old watch movement. No heating the part, x-rays, vacuum chambers, proton bombardment or incantations necessary, nothing but a toothpick and two fingers. Reminds me of the old motorcycle headlight that instructed me to clean the reflector with a feather - oh yeah, I have a supply of feathers laying around!

So, try all that stuff, it's part of the shooting experience. Just remember that some of those products are repackaged industrial commodities, sold with hype at a great markup. One favorite barrel thread compound I used was discovered to be nothing more than standard food machine grade Teflon grease. Often we buy because of the name, Frog Lube, Hamburger Helper, Loony Tuna, whatever.

You are not a shooter until you have a shelf lined with half used bottles, tubes and aerosol cans of miracle products now passed over for the latest innovation. Just don't get me going on bore solvents.

Last edited by Wrangler John; 01-16-2013 at 3:02 AM..
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