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-   -   Torn on Bug Out Vehicle (http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=679588)

Irish_Man 01-15-2013 10:21 AM

Torn on Bug Out Vehicle
 
So I live in a less populated area in Eastern Washington (less than 200,000 people in the entire area). If something were to happen, like a volcano or something catastrophic that I could drive away from what should I take.. I have been thinking about it and am torn. I own a 30ft Jamboree RV, I also own a 4x4 Tahoe. It would be my wife and my 2 pre-teen girls. So my options are this.

Option 1
I take the RV and head east into the mountains. The RV is always prepped and ready to go, full of gas, and propane. Just fill with water, throw your underwear in and go. The range of the RV is about 350 miles or so.. I know of many out of the way, off the grid camping spots I could easily get to. The advantage of the RV, is you have built in shelter (you could live in it forever if needed). You will also have heat, cooking, and water for a time. The disadvantages are it's huge and lumbering. You really don't want to use it for supply runs or get aways. And once your setup it's easy to see (big white box sitting in the forest).

Option 2
I take the Tahoe and load it with camping gear and whatever other supplies I can fit in it. I then head up into the mountains. The range is about the same at about 350 miles. The advantages of the Tahoe is it's fast (er), it's much smaller and nimble, I could get even more out of the way with it (4x4). It's also lower profile, and easy to use for supply runs and get aways. The disadvantages are that it's much smaller so the ability to store supplies is limited, also it really doesn't have a whole lot of living space (you could sleep in it if you had to for a couple of nights). You would still need to setup a camp for cooking and such, which you then need to tear down to evac.

So I'm a little torn. This is for some kind of big event, that I may bug out and it could be weeks if I ever come back..

I also have an Adventure Bike which I would strongly consider bringing, especially if I did the RV route, but then I need to take a trailer also..

Thanks
Mike

baz152 01-15-2013 10:27 AM

Or option 3:

You drive the RV and your wife leads / follows in the Tahoe. You can carry more gear have more options and have better chances with the flexibility.

Montu 01-15-2013 10:52 AM

Tahoe, less likely to get stuck places due to how big the vehicle is and although the range is the same I bet the MPG is better on the Tahoe for when fuel is hard to come by.

paul0660 01-15-2013 10:54 AM

East, after a volcano.

Good luck.

Onetyme 01-15-2013 11:09 AM

I agree with taking both. Initially give yourself as many options as possible. Understand that you may have to abandon the rv at some point & prepare for that.

calif 15-22 01-15-2013 11:19 AM

I disagree with taking both . . . here's why.

With the RV you are going to over pack for sure. While the inital range may be the same once you burn that tank of gas getting more may be difficult.
The RV would not be as nimble when you encounter traffic on the highway. The Tahoe is more ready to head off road when needed.

You might want to stash your RV at a predefineed bug out location fully loaded. That way you use the Tahoe to get where you are going and the RV and a refilling depot.

Good luck . . .

glock21fan 01-15-2013 11:20 AM

+1 on having the tahoe and rv hell. Trailer the bike too that should give you some options, some storage, and if one gets damaged you have the other. Pick up some extra propane for the rv. Sounds like fun

canative 01-15-2013 12:05 PM

Think about getting one of those used military trailers. Could tow behind your Tahoe wherever you take it. That's what I am thinking about.

Irish_Man 01-15-2013 1:39 PM

Well with 350 Mile gas range on the RV I could easily be into Idaho, Montana or Canada. So I think 350 Miles is a pretty good range. If I took the RV I think one tank would get me where I want to hunker down. I have also contemplated taking both rigs. I just don't like the idea of twice the vehicles, twice the gas, and even though we are following each other, the chance of getting separated.

I do have an enclosed trailer which is also an option. I use it to take the bike camping. It could be used as a shelter plus storage if we only took the Tahoe. Although when I tow the trailer the tahoe only gets around 11mpg vs 18 to 20.

Also I'm not really worried about traffic. I am far enough away from any major metropolis. I believe I could get anywhere I need to go without fighting through too much traffic. I'd be passing through little towns with less than 10,000 people in them.

Lifeon2whls 01-15-2013 2:05 PM

RV is just going to be a BIG rolling target for all of those who didn't plan ahead. Good luck with that.

clbshooter 01-15-2013 2:25 PM

I you can afford it a Sportsmobile would be nice. One ton chassis with 4 wheeldrive and most of the things that you have in a regular RV. Check out their website.

clbshooter 01-15-2013 2:26 PM

If you can afford it a Sportsmobile would be nice. One ton chassis with 4 wheeldrive and most of the things that you have in a regular RV. Check out their website.

Lifeon2whls 01-15-2013 2:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clbshooter (Post 10218887)
If you can afford it a Sportsmobile would be nice. One ton chassis with 4 wheeldrive and most of the things that you have in a regular RV. Check out their website.

These are NICE. There is one parked behind our parking garage at work and I admire it on a regular basis, but it looks like serious money.

M1NM 01-15-2013 2:37 PM

We're taking our BlueBird Wanderlodge (holds 235 gallons of diesel and gets about 8mpg) and towing our K5 Chevy Blazer (33 gallons and 15mpg).

baz152 01-15-2013 4:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lifeon2whls (Post 10218722)
RV is just going to be a BIG rolling target for all of those who didn't plan ahead. Good luck with that.

An overloaded Tahoe with a trailer and stuff mounted on the roof will be that same target.

After the OP loads the wife, two kids and himself into the Tahoe with no trailer and nothing on the roof, there will not be a lot of room to pack gear to survive on.

Since the OP lives in a somewhat rural area and there will not be much traffic, I see no reason to not take both vehicles; hell I would make the Tahoe a rolling gas can (RV support) with a bare minimum of supplies to get the family by in case the RV had to be ditched quickly.

OP, if there is not much traffic and you are only planning on going about 300 miles, I would not worry about getting separated, just keep close spacing and get a pair of GMRS radios. On a side note, if things got real bad, you and one daughter should be in the RV and your wife and other daughter should be in the Tahoe so you could maintain a "continuanty of family" if one vehicle and its passengers suffered a bad end (Better that you loose half of the family rather than the entire family).

Yes on camping trips the RV does stick out but I doubt that you were trying to hide it while camping. With a little effort its not that hard to camo an RV.

baz152 01-15-2013 4:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lifeon2whls (Post 10218722)
RV is just going to be a BIG rolling target for all of those who didn't plan ahead. Good luck with that.

An overloaded Tahoe with a trailer and stuff mounted on the roof will be that same target.

After the OP loads the wife, two kids and himself into the Tahoe with no trailer and nothing on the roof, there will not be a lot of room to pack gear to survive on.

Since the OP lives in a somewhat rural area and there will not be much traffic, I see no reason to not take both vehicles; hell I would make the Tahoe a rolling gas can (RV support) with a bare minimum of supplies to get the family by in case the RV had to be ditched quickly.

OP, if there is not much traffic and you are only planning on going about 300 miles, I would not worry about getting separated, just keep close spacing and get a pair of GMRS radios. On a side note, if things got real bad, you and one daughter should be in the RV and your wife and other daughter should be in the Tahoe so you could maintain a "continuanty of family" if one vehicle and its passengers suffered a bad end (Better that you loose half of the family rather than the entire family).

Yes on camping trips the RV does stick out but I doubt that you were trying to hide it while camping. With a little effort its not that hard to camo an RV.

Lucky Scott 01-15-2013 4:20 PM

1. Get a tow bar and set up the tahoe to be towed behind the RV.
2. Get some extra gas cans and extend your 350 mile per tank range. You can mount them in the back of the tahoe.

Lucky Scott 01-15-2013 4:42 PM

The bad thing about a RV is it does not make a good off road vehicle, and if there is a need to drive over curbs and around traffic jams, then it is not a good choice. However, there are a lot of other things to consider.
In the case of a huge emergency, and you need to bug out, the RV offers many advantages. Like,
You don't need to stop to use a bathroom. You don't need to leave your family unattended while you c**p in the bushes or in a bathroom.
You have your own on board kitchen also.
You carry your own water.
You have a place to sleep.
You can carry more food, clothes, guns and ammo than in a car or tahoe.
The RV offers the ability to cover the windows with curtains and stay out of sight. In a car with windows everybody can see how many people you have, ages, etc.

If you really think about it, you can come up with a lot of advantages.

You can also buy some cheap military type camo covering so that you can conceal the "big white box" in the woods.

sleepr66 01-15-2013 9:24 PM

Funny how reliability is mentioned everywhere in firearms, yet neglected when talking about a bug out vehicle. What vehicle is more maintained, what one has a better track record with you.
I have an Explorer, a Ranger, and a little Subaru sports car. If I were to ever make that gut wrenching trips what would I choose? The one that has proven itself to be the most reliable (which is the Subaru...sadly...cause I am a Ford guy).
But to answer your question, I would go with the Suburban. Much more liable to snake its way through whatever this theoretical scenario has to offer. Taking both is also a wise decision. If you are really concerned find a buddy who also shares your interest and make a plan. You drive my RV while I follow or lead sort of deal.

calif 15-22 01-16-2013 11:41 AM

These look very cool for a Bug out Vehicle.

http://www.100dollarman.com/trucks.html

toyotech 01-16-2013 8:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by calif 15-22 (Post 10227989)
These look very cool for a Bug out Vehicle.

http://www.100dollarman.com/trucks.html

big and slow. hard to find replacement parts if needed. most will run on just about any fuel.

Irish_Man 01-17-2013 6:44 AM

Thanks for all the great replies. I'm not really interested in getting ANOTHER vehicle.. I think I probably have enough toys as it is. Also i'm not interested in parking my RV at a bugout location.. I still use it for camping all through the year..

Maintenance on both vehicles is up to date. Oil changed every 3000 miles, fluids and filters checked, tire pressure, etc.... Both vehicles have less than 20,000 miles on them.

I think the best bet would be to try and take both vehicles. That way I have the needed shelter for longer term survival, but I also have a getaway/scavenging/exploring vehicle. BUT if I could only take one I think I would try and make it with the RV.. If I could get my bike loaded up in time, that would make it a pretty nice. Especially for supply runs and exploration.

ExAcHog 01-17-2013 12:06 PM

Option #243:
Take a couple of camping trips and scout out some nice locations you may want to bug out too.
Then go back and set up a few cache's in that area. That way if you need to abandon one vehicle, (I would take both) or even if you end up on foot, you will have some basics already in place.

"I know a guy" who along with his buddies have set up a few buried caches in and along the way to their bug out location.
A 30 gallon drum can hold months worth of rice and beans, a cooking pot, water filter, a ruger 10/22, 1K rounds of .22 a sidearm, a saw and enough tarps and nails etc, to create a decent shelter.

One thing I have learned from the guys on this forum is REDUNDANCY...Two is one and one is none.

TurboChrisB 01-17-2013 12:38 PM

I like the idea of towing the Truck behind the RV. Being that you're in a fairly rural area...that'd be the way I'd probably be thinking.

Whoneedsafety? 01-18-2013 4:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paul0660 (Post 10217200)
East, after a volcano.

Good luck.

Umm... I would head southwest. Ash and fumes from the volcano will be carried east. Plus when you get to the ocean you'll have all the fish you can catch.

steadyrock 01-18-2013 4:56 PM

You're in my favorite part of the country - I'm from there, or therabouts. Whereabouts in Eastern WA are you? If you're prepping for Mt Rainier or Mt St Helens to blow, remember that ash from Mt Mazama was 3 feet thick in Idaho after it blew. Of course that took months to accumulate, something else you want to be prepared for. I had friends in Portland when St Helens blew in 1980, to my knowledge they had no special survival preps but they made it through OK.

That said, I'd take the RV first. If you can manage it, the Tahoe would be a nice get-around car once you reach wherever you're going (it will be hard to take the RV on a run to the Circle K to get milk), but in the case you can't take both definitely opt for what will give you and your family the best chance, e.g. the RV. A little hard for four people to eat, sleep, cook, and poo in a Tahoe for a week or two. The RV shouldn't have that problem. Don't worry so much about being a target - arm yourself and sleep light, but it isn't going to be Mad Max time. In my mind, it isn't even a question. Head East or Southeast (Mazama ash reached Missoula, but not Reno), hunker down and play some cards. Then go back home and bust out the shovel to find your home again.

mossy590 01-20-2013 9:36 PM

I agree with towing the tahoe behind the RV. It'll keep everyone together and give better observation and communocation, I'd also put 1/2 the supplies (if that much fits) in the tahoe in case you have to ditch the RV quickly.

chrisf 01-22-2013 5:21 AM

I
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Irish_Man (Post 10218530)
Well with 350 Mile gas range on the RV I could easily be into Idaho, Montana or Canada. So I think 350 Miles is a pretty good range. If I took the RV I think one tank would get me where I want to hunker down. I have also contemplated taking both rigs. I just don't like the idea of twice the vehicles, twice the gas, and even though we are following each other, the chance of getting separated.

I do have an enclosed trailer which is also an option. I use it to take the bike camping. It could be used as a shelter plus storage if we only took the Tahoe. Although when I tow the trailer the tahoe only gets around 11mpg vs 18 to 20.

Also I'm not really worried about traffic. I am far enough away from any major metropolis. I believe I could get anywhere I need to go without fighting through too much traffic. I'd be passing through little towns with less than 10,000 people in them.

Just had to ask. What kind of tahoe do you have that gets 18-20mpg? My explorer v6 4x4 only gets 12-18?

RandyD 01-22-2013 7:32 AM

I am also from Eastern Washington; family owns an 8500 acre wheat farm outside of the tricities. This is the area that I would go to in the event of a bad turn of events. Why would you want to bug out of this location? There are no earthquakes, sunamis, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes or even heavy snow fall in this area. The nearest volcano is at least 100 miles away, which is far enough away that if it erupted it would not harm you. Also, the fewer people the lower the chance of any civil disruption.

adonis 01-22-2013 8:16 AM

Well built 4x4 crew cab diesel pickup. You can put a camper on the back, or even just a fiberglass shell. Small lift with some good tires and they will get through some nasty stuff.

Throw in an aux fuel tank and you can get 100 gallons without much trouble. From wa, worry about fuel somewhere near Tx or Ohio lol.

Those unimog motorhomes are sweet, but $$$$

Irish_Man 01-22-2013 8:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RandyD (Post 10282398)
I am also from Eastern Washington; family owns an 8500 acre wheat farm outside of the tricities. This is the area that I would go to in the event of a bad turn of events. Why would you want to bug out of this location? There are no earthquakes, sunamis, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes or even heavy snow fall in this area. The nearest volcano is at least 100 miles away, which is far enough away that if it erupted it would not harm you. Also, the fewer people the lower the chance of any civil disruption.

Actually I am in Tri-Cities.. It is a great area and I'm not horribly worried about any real natural disaster. The only thing being Maybe Rainier. I do not want to go west at all.. If some sort of crazy disaster happens or civil unrest all the masses from the coast will be heading east or to the ocean. I want to stay as far away from the masses as possible. Other than Rainier we also have the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. I'm not sure how worried I am about that though. Not much going on out there anymore, except cleanup.

I have a 2010 Tahoe. It gets up to about 20 on the highway if you baby it.

Yeah I lived in Olympia in 80 when St. Helens blew. It was a very interesting time.. We made it through no problems though..

Thanks

RandyD 01-22-2013 9:55 AM

Irish Man, this is a small world. There is another member on this site, huntercf, who is also from the tricities area. We have never met, but he went to school with and knows my cousins. I have told my aunt and uncle that is SHTF, I will be on their doorsteps in 24 hours.

That area has plenty of fresh water, fishing and hunting to sustain you and the weather never causes problems.

I was up in that area after Mt. St. Helens errupted, and remember seeing the ash on the side of the roads.

bsg 01-22-2013 10:24 AM

i suggest you consider preparing both vehicles to be part of a single 'unit' that can travel together, and also readying each vehicle to be gtg as a bug out vehicle independent of the other; this means there would be some redundancy with the supplies stored in each separate vehicle. should you need to bug out, you may not know until the need for a vehicle arises... which one (or both) will meet your needs or be left out of the equation due to external factors; you may not have a choice as to which vehicle to travel in. further limitations of either vehicle could occur after the initial bug out, depending on challenges to the vehicle from externally provided dependent variables.

wheels 01-22-2013 10:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bsg (Post 10284040)
i suggest you consider preparing both vehicles to be part of a single 'unit' that can travel together, and also readying each vehicle to be gtg as a bug out vehicle independent of the other; this means there would be some redundancy with the supplies stored in each separate vehicle. should you need to bug out, you may not know until the need for a vehicle arises... which one (or both) will meet your needs or be left out of the equation due to external factors; you may not have a choice as to which vehicle to travel in. further limitations of either vehicle could occur after the initial bug out, depending on challenges to the vehicle from externally provided dependent variables.

This - also consider doing a triage on your supplies in case you need to abandon one or the other vehicle in a hurry. Mark important supplies with red tape, essentials with orange, and nice to haves with yellow. some way to prioritize your supplies if you need to loose a vehicle or worst case both.

I also picked a double baby stroller/jogger/bike trailer (craigslist great deal) that will be used in case my BOV has to be abandoned

bsg 01-22-2013 11:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wheels (Post 10284132)
This - also consider doing a triage on your supplies in case you need to abandon one or the other vehicle in a hurry. Mark important supplies with red tape, essentials with orange, and nice to haves with yellow. some way to prioritize your supplies if you need to loose a vehicle or worst case both.

I also picked a double baby stroller/jogger/bike trailer (craigslist great deal) that will be used in case my BOV has to be abandoned


^^^ smart preparedness.

there is always the potential that there will be no access to ground that will avail travel by motorized vehicles such as an SUV or RV. manually operated transport carriers (to carry items needed to survive) reduce the number of dependent variables (compared to motorized vehicle) for their successful use.

skuehl 01-23-2013 8:57 PM

sell one and buy this.

http://orangecounty.craigslist.org/cto/3546702134.html

Squidward 01-24-2013 9:39 AM

I like small, light and fast.
 
I think that the vehicle you choose will ultimately be determined by the equipment and personal items you feel are necessary to take. I also like wheel's ideas on pre-marking equipment.

I'd opt for the Tahoe. Easier to maneuver, can go off-road and less visible as a target. It can double as an RV with very few additional camping related items. And, if you have to beat it quickly, the Tahoe will leave the RV in the dirt.

I'd also take a couple of bicycles and a folding bicycle trailer as back up transportation. A hitch mounted cargo hauler and roof rack for additional storage would also be on my list.

Oh, and some nice camo netting to cover it all up if I have to stop overnight.

JaMail 01-24-2013 9:48 AM

or you trade a shotgun and a couple hundred rounds of ammo to the local dealer and drive away with a brand new 4x4.

if you have enough time, you rent one from the local RV rental place 2 miles from my house.

i also have almost zero plans on bugging out since i think in the first week of a SHTF scenario that vehicles other than dirt bikes will be useless.

LRShooter 01-24-2013 11:38 AM

4 months out of the year it's too cold to be in a tent in ID, WA, or MT. I'd definitely want the RV during the cold months. I'd want it year round if at all possible.

Take both vehicles, get a set of handheld radios so you can communicate between them.

redrex 01-24-2013 6:36 PM

Sell the RV and get a trailer. Trailers, due to not having the power train of the RV make better use of their space. Also should things get dicey you can ditch the trailer and keep going in the RV. Taking both the RV and the Tahoe would be a huge waste of gas. Taking just the RV limits you when you stop. No making short runs without having to take the whole house with you.

I've been looking at the same issues myself and I'm going with an early 80's full size ford bronco and a 24" trailer. I'd like to get a toy hauler. Not that I have any toys but I like the loading ramp and full storage area of a toy hauler. If we can't shelter in place I can take all my supplies, wheel them right up the ramp, shut the door and go!


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