Calguns.net

Calguns.net (http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/index.php)
-   Survival and Preparations (http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/forumdisplay.php?f=297)
-   -   8 Foods That Will Never Expire (http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=676113)

Yehosha 01-10-2013 11:37 PM

8 Foods That Will Never Expire
 
For full details on storage of the items go here. Here's the list:

1. Hard Liquor
2. Rice
3. Sugar
4. Cornstarch
5. Honey
6. Distilled White Vinegar
7. Pure Vanilla Extract
8. Salt

I've also read that dried beans and pasta never expire either, just lose flavor and become harder to cook, but those weren't mentioned in the article.

What are your thoughts on with those foods?

Rucku5 01-10-2013 11:52 PM

Salt isn't food its a mineral :)

BlueCrash 01-10-2013 11:58 PM

on rice. i was told that (from testing of 5year old government reserve) they lose nutrition and flavor but this was stored in warehouse in bags, not sure if storing them in nitrogen fill or oxygen less container will remedy that or not.

Saym14 01-11-2013 12:05 AM

most canned foods will last 50 years. that will outlast me.

ExAcHog 01-11-2013 12:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BlueCrash (Post 10176210)
on rice. i was told that (from testing of 5year old government reserve) they lose nutrition and flavor but this was stored in warehouse in bags, not sure if storing them in nitrogen fill or oxygen less container will remedy that or not.

I have read that archaeologists have found rice that was sealed in clay potts that still held some nutritional value after a 1000 YEARS OR MORE! Serioulsy....check it out online.

cdtx2001 01-11-2013 6:37 AM

Peanut butter seems to last a long time.

KevinB 01-11-2013 6:44 AM

Canned rice and beans will still be good at 30 + years. We have used canned oats from our pantry that was 16 years old and it was fine.

Most canned goods will last longer than you. Cool dry storage is the key.

kalaca 01-11-2013 6:55 AM

Mc Donald's!
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/...37_968x528.jpg

LCU1670 01-11-2013 7:08 AM

My wife and I were talking about this. What to store that doesnt break the bank and can be lazy on rotating it, we thought: rice, oatmeal, beans, pasta. However, need water.

LCU1670 01-11-2013 7:12 AM

Ps, bought a solar powered "generator" storage device at Costco yesterday for $699. Will try it out today. Works at steady 1500 watts. Will expand it with some solar collectors from harbor freight. So solar day, gas generator night. If needed.

Insight.556 01-11-2013 7:31 AM

I think historically, rice is one of the more robust foods in terms of holding up well to storage (both warehousing, and during long distance trips). In fact, if it is stored in a cool, dry place it (rice) can be stored indefinitely.

Like ExAcHog mentioned, there are many incidents where viable rice had been discovered stored at archaeological sites that are literally 1,000s of years old. The key word is DRY. Trapped moisture while storing, will not only spoil the rice, but welcome to a funky smell like no other. (From first hand experience) :ack2: :ack2: :ack2:

buffalkill 01-11-2013 7:46 AM

Have you ever tried making anything out of: Hard Liquor, Rice, Sugar, Cornstarch, Honey, Distilled White Vinegar, Pure Vanilla Extract, and Salt ;) sounds like a science experiment.

RookieShooter 01-11-2013 7:55 AM

"So feel free to cook up that bag of rice you found lodged behind your kitchen cabinet (with a purchase date of 1982), it's just as good for you as the day you bought it."

Apparently, the author of this article doesn't eat enough rice in his lifetime therefore he can't tell the difference.

Insight.556 01-11-2013 8:33 AM

Just because something is edible, or has nutrional value does NOT mean it is tasty, or enjoyable in anyway... Right? If it were a situation in which there was little, to no food and the outlook for finding more was not good than it is most definitely better than nothing.

However, if it was just another Tuesday night, with a fridge full of food I can't really see myself going right for the 30(+) year old bag of rice I found way back in the pantry for dinner.

delta9 01-11-2013 12:23 PM

My shooting rests are filled with rice and are part of my SHTF food reserves

The Geologist 01-11-2013 2:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yehosha (Post 10176104)
For full details on storage of the items go here. Here's the list:

1. Hard Liquor
2. Rice
3. Sugar
4. Cornstarch
5. Honey
6. Distilled White Vinegar
7. Pure Vanilla Extract
8. Salt

I've also read that dried beans and pasta never expire either, just lose flavor and become harder to cook, but those weren't mentioned in the article.

What are your thoughts on with those foods?

Forgot Twinkies

The Geologist 01-11-2013 2:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buffalkill (Post 10177611)
Have you ever tried making anything out of: Hard Liquor, Rice, Sugar, Cornstarch, Honey, Distilled White Vinegar, Pure Vanilla Extract, and Salt ;) sounds like a science experiment.

Leave out the vinegar and you might have the makings for rum balls

dunndeal 01-11-2013 3:12 PM

I home can a lot of salmon and albacore tuna, I rotate the stock every year but always have at least 50 pints on hand.

Vacuum packed whole grains wil last for years too.

Cali-Glock 01-11-2013 7:24 PM

Rice works great long term. Yes, ten year old rice (stored in original plastic bags only) does not cook quite as well as brand new rice, but there is not much of a difference.

olhunter 01-11-2013 7:42 PM

Just opened a jar of Planters Dry Roasted Peanuts we put in a lost kit after the 94 earthquake. Fresh n Tasty. They 'vacuum packed' them back then, so that's probably the key. No oxygen. Don't know if they're still vacuum packed.

Sheepdog1968 01-11-2013 8:12 PM

Unground wheat will last 30 plus years. Rawles in some of his books talks about this,stuff.

Saym14 01-11-2013 9:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VictorFranko (Post 10177485)
Not around my house :(

LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Saym14 01-11-2013 9:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VictorFranko (Post 10177485)
Not around my house :(

LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Saym14 01-11-2013 9:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VictorFranko (Post 10177485)
Not around my house :(

LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

RCJeeper 01-12-2013 10:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Saym14 (Post 10176251)
most canned foods will last 50 years. that will outlast me.

Is this really true? Why do all cans have expiration dates, and some much longer than others?

CSACANNONEER 01-12-2013 10:35 AM

I wish I had been smart enough to stockpile 5000 boxes of twinkies 10 years ago.

delta9 01-12-2013 10:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RCJeeper (Post 10189575)
Is this really true? Why do all cans have expiration dates, and some much longer than others?

Those are not "expiration" dates - they are "use by" dates which are manufacturer suggestions for peak quality. Foods used after those dates might loose taste or change texture but they wont go "bad"

Modern canned foods, when packaged correctly, are sterile and as long as the container remains sealed and not subject to extreme temperature, should pretty much last forever

Datdarkness 01-12-2013 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CSACANNONEER (Post 10189623)
I wish I had been smart enough to stockpile 5000 boxes of twinkies 10 years ago.

if only :/ haha

delta9 01-12-2013 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CSACANNONEER (Post 10189623)
I wish I had been smart enough to stockpile 5000 boxes of twinkies 10 years ago.

It's an urban legend that Twinkies have an extended shelf life. Because they have dairy products as ingredients they are actually only good for 25 days

http://www.snopes.com/food/ingredient/twinkies.asp

Socalman 01-12-2013 3:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cdtx2001 (Post 10177268)
Peanut butter seems to last a long time.

I would disagree with you on that. Though not a scientific study by any means, we have a place in the Big Bear area. It does not get too hot in the summer and during the winter never gets below 58 inside. I had some p-nut butter that had not been opened but was about 13 months past the expiration date. Tried and it had a very stale taste. I am sure it is due to the oil going rancid. It may not be bad for you, but it did not taste at all decent.

Socalman 01-12-2013 3:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by buffalkill (Post 10177611)
Have you ever tried making anything out of: Hard Liquor, Rice, Sugar, Cornstarch, Honey, Distilled White Vinegar, Pure Vanilla Extract, and Salt ;) sounds like a science experiment.

Sounds like an episode of "Chopped" from the Food Network.

Joewy 01-12-2013 5:11 PM

Rice does go bad. And honey oxidizes if you are not carful into a rock.

BonnieB 01-12-2013 5:29 PM

Honey that has crystallized can easily be re-hydrated by placing the jar in a pot, in one inch of water, over low heat. (A glass jar, not the plastic bears...)

Honey is naturally antibacterial, btw, which is why it lasts forever if airtight. And it can be used on cuts etc, if all else fails.

billofrights 01-12-2013 6:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Geologist (Post 10181510)
Forgot Twinkies

Twinkies are, most definitely, not "food."

Steve_In_29 01-12-2013 8:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RCJeeper (Post 10189575)
Is this really true? Why do all cans have expiration dates, and some much longer than others?

I saw something where a rep from Spam stated they only printed expiration dates on it so people could rotate stocks. IIRC they opened up a 15 yo can and it was still perfectly good.

sunborder 01-13-2013 8:37 AM

Quote:

My shooting rests are filled with rice and are part of my SHTF food reserves
I hope you are joking. The lead residue from primers and bullet bases probably finds its way through the fabric into your rice. I suppose in an end-of-the-world scenario it might be worth it to eat that and risk lead poisoning, but otherwise, no.

Quote:

Rice works great long term. Yes, ten year old rice (stored in original plastic bags only) does not cook quite as well as brand new rice, but there is not much of a difference.
Pretty much any Asian person would disagree with you. My wife complains that the rice we buy here in the states tastes "old." When I lived in Japan, there was a big thing about rice being "new crop." Is it EDIBLE after 10+ years? Sure. Will most Americans care? Probably not. Is there "much of a difference?" Actually, yes. Also, brown rice does NOT store well.

KevinB 01-13-2013 9:12 AM

Proper storage is the key of any food. Cool and dry is the key. We store all our long term food stuffs in cans and oxygen absorbers. Quality and taste is still good at 10 years when we have checked.

Fresh is always going to be better, but that will not be possible if things go south.

Ask a starving person if they care if their rice- beans are fresh.

ElDub1950 01-13-2013 9:31 AM

When talking about canned food, there's a big difference between factory made food in metal cans and home-canned food.

Most factory canned food does not have a very long shelf life .. often only a year or two. A few are very good with a 10+ year shelf life.

Properly home canned food can be much more stable. Also, if you home can food and include lots of extra liquid, that can go a long way to satisfy your daily water needs. Remember, having a 10 year supply of rice and beans is useless if you only have 10 cases of bottled water. Especially here in CA where the majority of people have no access to a natural water source.

KevinB 01-13-2013 9:48 AM

Eldub, not true, not even close. Please name me one commercially canned food that goes bad in 2 years or less.

I would go so far to say that home canning poses a greater risk to spoilage than commercially canned food. People take too many shortcuts and quality control along with proper sanitation.

Don't confuse the best use by freshness date with the food going bad.

ZombieZoo 01-13-2013 9:54 AM

Wine has been found drinkable from Greek wrecks.

Even if it turns to vinegar it isn't a total loss.


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 6:42 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.