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-   -   I want to start reloading (http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=642323)

Rider1k 11-09-2012 8:01 PM

I want to start reloading
 
Not sure if this is the right thread. I want to start reloading. I think my balls are finally big enough to actually do it. Question..... Good starters set up?

MIAMIbaseballer 11-09-2012 8:05 PM

Would be a good idea to head over to the reloading forum and start reading. There are numerous threads for newbies... Read the stickies at the top

Depends on how mechanically inclined you are, rifle or pistol, how much money you wanna spend etc....

Reloading forum: http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/f...splay.php?f=89

Rider1k 11-09-2012 8:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MIAMIbaseballer (Post 9694169)
Would be a good idea to head over to the reloading forum and start reading. There are numerous threads for newbies...

Depends on how mechanically inclined you are, rifle or pistol, how much money you wanna spend etc....

I am mechanically inclined with 22 years in the trades. I will only buy quality. Rifle and pistol and shotgun preferably. I guess I missed the reloading forum. I will surely look it up. Thanks

Alex$ 11-09-2012 10:10 PM

For the money and versatility, go with Lee. If you decide after buying it is not for you, you haven't spent a fortune.

rromeo 11-10-2012 5:50 AM

I started with the Lee Classic Turret package. It was $230 +$30 for dies, and I was loading ammunition. You will buy more stuff later, but this will get you started.

Oceanbob 11-10-2012 6:22 AM

Good info here as well:

http://brianenos.com/

DarkSoul 11-10-2012 7:30 AM

If you want quality, reliability, and quite possibly the best CS in the industry, start with a Dillon 550. True, they are more expensive, you can expect to drop about $500 for the press ready to go, but it's versatility and quality are unmatched. Besides, if you find that reloading is not your gig, it will hold probably 90% of its value. And, if you keep it, you have a great "do everything" press.

I have a Dillon 550, 650, and 1050, and I still use the hell out of the 550. The other presses are great for bulk loading, but if you only need 25-100 rounds for hunting, match grade, or load development, the 550 again, it's hard to beat for ease of setup and repeatability.

Oceanbob 11-10-2012 7:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DarkSoul (Post 9695810)
If you want quality, reliability, and quite possibly the best CS in the industry, start with a Dillon 550. True, they are more expensive, you can expect to drop about $500 for the press ready to go, but it's versatility and quality are unmatched. Besides, if you find that reloading is not your gig, it will hold probably 90% of its value. And, if you keep it, you have a great "do everything" press.

I have a Dillon 550, 650, and 1050, and I still use the hell out of the 550. The other presses are great for bulk loading, but if you only need 25-100 rounds for hunting, match grade, or load development, the 550 again, it's hard to beat for ease of setup and repeatability.

This^^^^^

Resale value on the 550B is fantastic and the perfect press to buy.

More info:

http://brianenos.com/pages/dillon.html

I have a 1050 and 550B. Nothing better IMO.

Sunday 11-16-2012 6:36 PM

Buy a couple of reloading manuals and study up . Reloading isn't really hard and I rather enjoy it, but it takes alot of careful. I have had a Dillon since 1992 and have loaded quite a bit of ammo . The no BS warranty is awesome. I can't say enough good about Dillons service. The Dillon dies are great .

prob 11-16-2012 6:47 PM

If you're just getting started, go with a single stage press. You'll always use it and it's much simpler and less intimidating than a progressive press. When you figure out the loads that work for you, and have mastered the fundamentals, then by all means, buy a progressive press (preferably a Dillon).

Sky_DiveR 11-16-2012 9:19 PM

Read up... Research... You Tube.... If ya can, find a business that has a seminar/class or somebody that reloads to help figure out what ya wanna get started with. Figure out your budget and type of setup to start out with since it's really easy to spend more than you were planning. Ask me how I know... or anybody that reloads for that matter.

As far as equipment... ya can't lose with any of the major brands (not that there are any minor ones). They all have great customer service. Just different colors....

ar15barrels 11-16-2012 9:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rider1k (Post 9694158)
Not sure if this is the right thread. I want to start reloading. I think my balls are finally big enough to actually do it. Question..... Good starters set up?

Read my stickied threads "match ammo is too expensive" and "pistol ammo is too expensive" in the reloading forum.

Flouncer 11-17-2012 8:25 AM

No.

Stop.

Start with a single stage press so you can go slow and understand and see, feel the ammo.

Start inexpensive.

Start with single stage kit from Lee.

You will keep the Lee press and dies forever.

If, and only if, you like loading and upgrade, (not really upgrading) to more complex systems.

1meanchevy 11-20-2012 8:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flouncer (Post 9740244)
No.

Stop.

Start with a single stage press so you can go slow and understand and see, feel the ammo.

Start inexpensive.

Start with single stage kit from Lee.

You will keep the Lee press and dies forever.

If, and only if, you like loading and upgrade, (not really upgrading) to more complex systems.

^^+1 . I started with a lee single stage kit, probably the best way to go, you get everything you need to get started..... although the scale sucks.
I still use a couple things I got in that kit long ago.

Mr. Casull 11-28-2012 6:36 PM

Go with a Dillon. 650 is my choice. If you buy anything else you will eventually end up with the 650 so why waste you money and buy the best there is. A single stage press is for competition shooters that shoot 1/2 inch groups at 200 yards. And that is if they turn the necks, polish the flash holes, weigh each bullet and true them up before loading. If you just want to shoot targets out to 500 yards a progressive press is the right tool. My motto is cry once and buy the best. Otherwise after you mess with the cheap stuff or a single stage press you will lose money unloading it to buy what you should have bought in the first place. Hook up with somebody that already reloads and load up a couple thousand rounds on their press and see what you think. If you only shoot a few hundred rounds a year I wouldn't bother reloading. If you shoot 1,000's then reload with a progressive. I have a Lee progressive press that I would like to unload. Only bought it because at the time Dillon didn't make the shell plate, etc. for the 500 Magnum. Now that Dillon has the conversion kit the Lee is surplus. It worked way harder to resize and deprime than the Dillon.

ar15barrels 11-28-2012 6:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. Casull (Post 9809940)
A single stage press is for competition shooters that shoot 1/2 inch groups at 200 yards.
And that is if they turn the necks, polish the flash holes, weigh each bullet and true them up before loading.

I don't turn the necks, polish the flash holes, weigh each bullet or true them up, but I do size my precision rifle cases on a single stage press and I do shoot 1/2" groups at 200yds.
I don't deburr the flash holes or weigh the cases either, but I do weigh the amount of powder that I put into the case.

mrlonewolf 11-28-2012 6:54 PM

I'll move your thread to the right forum.

Please feel free to elaborate your questions to our reloader gang.....:D



*Edit. Tons of great info in here.

Enjoy.

bruceflinch 11-28-2012 7:17 PM

Pretty much all has been said.....+1 post count for me!

echang72 11-28-2012 9:51 PM

dont think.. just do it [; reloading, i found, is another hobby.. even though im still new too it.. its exciting to make your own loads!

the86d 11-29-2012 4:48 AM

Dillon XL650:
Most bells and whistles for 2 calibers, say 9mm and .223, it was around $1400 w/the case feeder (no adding cases manually one-by-one, nor manually cycling every round after ever crank on the handle like you have to on the 550b).
If you have it, drop the cash on an XL650, and you will be happy @ a rate of (after you get the hang of it) about 300/hour for 9mm, and maybe 200+/hour on .223... being careful.

If you don't have a chunk of change for an investment of $1400, there are MANY options that are available, all w/great quality, and most people rave about their press no matter who made it.

Just remember you will not save a penny reloading, you will just shoot 2-3 times more for the same price as people buying retail ammo. :)

There are extras that you forget about such as a tumbler, media/media separator, case trimmer (for rifle brass), primer pocket swagger, case gauge(s for rifle), and such that add to the cost, but you only have to buy those once, just like the press as most reloading equipment has a lifetime warranty AFAIK.

You can always sell your equipment for almost what you paid if you don't like it right here on this forum... I keep reading.

Cowboy T 11-29-2012 6:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by prob (Post 9737766)
If you're just getting started, go with a single stage press. You'll always use it and it's much simpler and less intimidating than a progressive press. When you figure out the loads that work for you, and have mastered the fundamentals, then by all means, buy a progressive press (preferably a Dillon).

Agreed here on this concept. Start single-stage first, for your safety. I did my first 1,000 rounds on an inexpensive ($30) single-stage, which I still use, so it hasn't gone to waste. Ha! Hardly!

Regarding the progressives, there's plenty of time to go for one of those. The various vendors will be just as overjoyed to take your money 6 months from now as they would be today. And while Dillon's certainly good gear, Dillon Precision isn't the only company out here that makes good, useful gear. I use a pair of Lee Pro 1000's and they're great. Others like the Hornady LnL AP. Still others like RCBS's Pro 2000.

You'll know better which, if any, of those progressives to buy after you get some single-stage experience.


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