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gordoe
04-04-2008, 4:31 PM
If a person is taken to the shooting range and he/she is a felon, can they still shoot?

Crazed_SS
04-04-2008, 4:33 PM
No.

edwardm
04-04-2008, 4:34 PM
If a person is taken to the shooting range and he/she is a felon, can they still shoot?

12021. (a) (1) Any person who has been convicted of a felony under
the laws of the United States, the State of California, or any other
state, government, or country or of an offense enumerated in
subdivision (a), (b), or (d) of Section 12001.6, or who is addicted
to the use of any narcotic drug, and who owns, purchases, receives,
or has in his or her possession or under his or her custody or
control any firearm is guilty of a felony.

aplinker
04-04-2008, 4:39 PM
If a person is taken to the shooting range and he/she is a felon, can they still shoot?

They can't even touch a gun, ever. Nor the magazine. Nor the ammo.

dreyna14
04-04-2008, 5:02 PM
While I agree in harsh punishment, this is going a little too far. Heck, even Martha Stewart can't touch a gun, for life!

Shotgun Man
04-04-2008, 5:08 PM
While I agree in harsh punishment, this is going a little too far. Heck, even Martha Stewart can't touch a gun, for life!

Yeah, I've wondered if one of the antis' strategies was the felonization of conduct to thereby eliminate one's gun rights.

In CA, you can scarcely cross the street without committing a felony.

hawk1
04-04-2008, 6:11 PM
While I agree in harsh punishment, this is going a little too far. Heck, even Martha Stewart can't touch a gun, for life!

Really? :eek:


Sorry, you commit a felony you deserve to lose your rights.
Also, Martha Stewart believes you, without the felony, shouldn't touch a gun either.

mymonkeyman
04-04-2008, 6:47 PM
Really? :eek:


Sorry, you commit a felony you deserve to lose your rights.
Also, Martha Stewart believes you, without the felony, shouldn't touch a gun either.

The problem is a felony used to mean something, it used to mean a really bad crime like murder, treason, etc. Now it's most crimes are felonies. It's almost a meaningless distinction, except that it's a meaningless distinction which can result in you never being allowed to possess a gun for the rest of your life. Almost all Federal crimes are felonies, and the majority of state crimes are felonies. Many of them are completely inane and you would not realize you are breaking them or doing anything wrong (i.e. they are malum prohibitum not malum in se). The only reason they are felonies is so the legislator can claim he is tough on X where X is gun control or financial transactions or food sanitation or whatever. Essentially people's whole lives are ruined for absolutely no good reason.

mecam
04-04-2008, 6:52 PM
How about misdemeanor? Can they shoot another person's gun at the range?

dreyna14
04-04-2008, 6:53 PM
You should indeed lose your rights and get your *** kicked. But there should be at least some kind of grace period for the return of you 2A rights once you've paid your dept back to society for non-violent felonies.

CSDGuy
04-04-2008, 6:57 PM
How about misdemeanor? Can they shoot another person's gun at the range?
If it's a prohibiting misdemeanor? 10 years. After that, they'd be OK.

mymonkeyman
04-04-2008, 7:20 PM
If it's a prohibiting misdemeanor? 10 years. After that, they'd be OK.

Unless it's a domestic violence misdemeanor, then you are banned for life.

Number 6
04-04-2008, 7:24 PM
Really? :eek:


Sorry, you commit a felony you deserve to lose your rights.
Also, Martha Stewart believes you, without the felony, shouldn't touch a gun either.

There are a lot of felonies on the books that are silly and frivolous. It’s a felony to eat a horse in California. Would eating a horse burger constitute justification for losing one's rights? If someone commits a violent felony I do not see a reason why they should have their rights restored, but otherwise I cannot see why eventually someone should not have their rights restored if they can prove that they have reformed their ways.

Paratus et Vigilans
04-04-2008, 7:37 PM
Heck, even Martha Stewart can't touch a gun, for life!

And I sleep better at night knowing this! :D

Rocko
04-04-2008, 7:43 PM
Wow you guys are harsh. I can't wait til YOU are someone in your family gets convicted of some bull**** crime that turns into a felony and this crap is imposed upon them!

You know you can get a felony for bouncing a check?

Bucc
04-04-2008, 7:45 PM
You should indeed lose your rights and get your *** kicked. But there should be at least some kind of grace period for the return of you 2A rights once you've paid your dept back to society for non-violent felonies.


Debt to society.......:rolleyes:

hawk1
04-04-2008, 8:13 PM
Wow you guys are harsh. I can't wait til YOU are someone in your family gets convicted of some bull**** crime that turns into a felony and this crap is imposed upon them!

You know you can get a felony for bouncing a check?

It did happen in my family. My older brother, the dumbass, seemed to think his "felonies" were not that big of a deal. Talked his wife into buying a M1A for him. No big deal it was a "birthday present" they said. Then when the dumb *** thought he'd get another relative to buy a pistol for him that relative turned him in. He spent almost 5 years at Corcoran prison. Yep, second strike, first was a drug conviction. I can't wait till he gets his third strike. He has that "the laws don't pertain to me attitude" because what he did was no big deal...
Oh, don't bounce a check...

Casual Observer
04-04-2008, 8:14 PM
Wow you guys are harsh. I can't wait til YOU are someone in your family gets convicted of some bull**** crime that turns into a felony and this crap is imposed upon them!

You know you can get a felony for bouncing a check?

IIRC, it's a little more complicated than that and it runs along the same lines as fraud. Accidentally writing a check for $35 dollars when you only have $32.50 in your account because you forgot about the bank's monthly service charge isn't going to be a felony.

Besides, felons loose the right to vote, the MOST fundamental right in a democracy. In light of that, the 2nd Amendment is small potatoes.

xrMike
04-04-2008, 9:00 PM
Besides, felons loose the right to vote, the MOST fundamental right in a democracy. In light of that, the 2nd Amendment is small potatoes.I'd rather lose the right to vote.

Over the years, my guns have brought me 1000 times more satisfaction and enjoyment than voting has. I think it's because no matter who I vote for, a clown always wins.

And if really hard times ever come -- SHTF, revolution, or whatever -- I can always vote from the rooftop, as long as I have my guns.

ybz
04-04-2008, 11:18 PM
Wow you guys are harsh.

You know you can get a felony for bouncing a check?


if you get a felony for bouncing a check, it would require you to say F.U. to the person you were paying, for them to press charges and turn you to the DA... if that's the case, you really deserve to get a felony and loose all your rights... that is just plain theft and really the lowest form of scum baggery...
i may be venting a little since i've been given a few bad checks lately...

Mr. Mildot
04-04-2008, 11:23 PM
I'd rather lose the right to vote.

Over the years, my guns have brought me 1000 times more satisfaction and enjoyment than voting has. I think it's because no matter who I vote for, a clown always wins.

And if really hard times ever come -- SHTF, revolution, or whatever -- I can always vote from the rooftop, as long as I have my guns.


both are important, but voting in CA is like pissing in the wind.

xmustanguyx
04-04-2008, 11:38 PM
How about misdemeanor? Can they shoot another person's gun at the range?

misdemeanor domestic violence and you lose right to own a gun, if you are party
to or currently involved in court case regarding family court you can't Buy a gun,
Usually the police confiscate all your weapons on domestic cases.

Source..self, bail agent california.

(can't shoot if you have the d.v., other misdemeanors is ok, even if
you have court case pending you can still shoot.--if it's not domestic.
The court/police really do not want you to have a gun in your possession
at all if you have a any type of domestic or family case pending.

Bucc
04-05-2008, 1:11 AM
Besides, felons loose the right to vote, the MOST fundamental right in a democracy. In light of that, the 2nd Amendment is small potatoes.

Never seen a Diebold machine then have you.
Cast that vote and never know what you voted for no matter what the machine printout says.
Might never get where it needs to anyway.
My mom works on the elections or rather did up til last year.
They had to turn people away for several hours because the machines were down.....paper ballots don't crash.
They also lost a couple hundred votes when it happened.

I recall voting for things that either got tossed by activist judges or while in the process of being tossed were negotiated away by activist governors.
Your votes rarely count.

Alan Block
04-05-2008, 2:36 AM
Most people go their entire lives without commiting a single felony. Now that you know, it shouldnt be that hard to not eat a horse. I believe felons also lose their right to a passport.

Lateralus
04-05-2008, 12:12 PM
I, for the most part (few cases aside), believe in the felony law.

I am quite sure that I will go my life without becoming a felon, because if you stay out of trouble, youll do fine. Now on the other side, my GFs brother in law is a former marine, in for 16 years. With his first wife, whom well call "psycho", he had three children. He was carrying his infant son down the stairs one day and slipped. In the process, the son had a minor brush with gravity resulting in a small bruise on his arm. Psycho, whom was trying to screw him over in the last days of their dying marriage, called the police and CPS, and mr. marine now has a felony child abuse on his record. It does happen.

Moral of the story: DONT MARRY A F*CKING PSYCHO SHE (he for some of you) WILL TAKE YOUR MONEY, HOUSE AND 2A RIGHTS.


On a side note: post count 556:cool:

s2000news
04-05-2008, 12:22 PM
They can't even touch a gun, ever. Nor the magazine. Nor the ammo.


What is the PC for ammo restrictions?

I know probation restricts ammo possession, but what PC is a felon not allowed to possess ammo?

mymonkeyman
04-05-2008, 8:00 PM
What is the PC for ammo restrictions?

I know probation restricts ammo possession, but what PC is a felon not allowed to possess ammo?

18 USC 922(g)

(g) It shall be unlawful for any person—
(1) who has been convicted in any court of, a crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year;
(2) who is a fugitive from justice;
(3) who is an unlawful user of or addicted to any controlled substance (as defined in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802));
(4) who has been adjudicated as a mental defective or who has been committed to a mental institution;
(5) who, being an alien—
(A) is illegally or unlawfully in the United States; or
(B) except as provided in subsection (y)(2), has been admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa (as that term is defined in section 101(a)(26) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101 (a)(26)));
(6) who has been discharged from the Armed Forces under dishonorable conditions;
(7) who, having been a citizen of the United States, has renounced his citizenship;
(8) who is subject to a court order that—
(A) was issued after a hearing of which such person received actual notice, and at which such person had an opportunity to participate;
(B) restrains such person from harassing, stalking, or threatening an intimate partner of such person or child of such intimate partner or person, or engaging in other conduct that would place an intimate partner in reasonable fear of bodily injury to the partner or child; and
(C)
(i) includes a finding that such person represents a credible threat to the physical safety of such intimate partner or child; or
(ii) by its terms explicitly prohibits the use, attempted use, or threatened use of physical force against such intimate partner or child that would reasonably be expected to cause bodily injury; or
(9) who has been convicted in any court of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence,

to ship or transport in interstate or foreign commerce, or possess in or affecting commerce, any firearm or ammunition; or to receive any firearm or ammunition which has been shipped or transported in interstate or foreign commerce.

tyrist
04-05-2008, 9:19 PM
The difference between a Misdemeanor and a felony is whether you can do more than a year in prison or less than a year in jail. It's that simple. Also if you have reviewed numerous rap sheets you would see that while somebody may not have been "convicted" of a violent crime they certainly have numerous arrests for them. Often times they will drop the violent offense and you plead guilty to the lesser of two felonies. Those people would nolonger fall into the prohibited catagorey and most certainly should.

Shotgun Man
04-06-2008, 12:38 PM
What is the PC for ammo restrictions?

I know probation restricts ammo possession, but what PC is a felon not allowed to possess ammo?

In California, the applicable section is Cal Pen Code § 12316(b)(1):

No person prohibited from owning or possessing a firearm under Section 12021or 12021.1 of this code or Section 8100 or 8103 of the Welfare and Institutions Code shall own, possess, or have under his or her custody or control, any ammunition or reloaded ammunition.


(3) A violation of this subdivision is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not to exceed one year or in the state prison, by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000), or by both the fine and imprisonment.

5150Marcelo
04-06-2008, 12:43 PM
While I agree in harsh punishment, this is going a little too far. Heck, even Martha Stewart can't touch a gun, for life!

Yeah but Martha can buy a person, to go to the shooting range and shoot for her without her leaving the shieter:eek: $$$$$