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View Full Version : I just bought a Remington Model 721 today....


Halzman
02-23-2008, 6:59 PM
Hello everyone!

Today I bought my first gun. Unfortunately, I didnt have the money to get what I would of wanted to get, I settled for a bolt-action rifle. I went with a used 721 that fit within my price range. I was also told that this gun is what the Remington 700 is based on, after it being discontinued in 1948 i believe it was.

I've done various searches on the internet, trying to find any data on the gun, as well as any after-market parts available, such as stocks. The dealer did also mention that the 721 was interchangable with most 700 parts, but he didnt specify which parts exactly.

THe 721 purchased is a .30-06, which from what I've read, has serious kickback, but it due in part largely to the fact of the stock design. I plan on changing the stock to something more modern. Ideally I would like this rifle to be built into a sniper weapon like the M40A3. I was also wondering about barrel replacements, such as, could I convert this gun to a .308? I know it probably would of been easier to go with a remington 700 right off the bat, but cash it tight and I would like to start learning how to fire a rifle.

As I said, I didnt find much information on this gun on the net. I was forunate to find a dissasembly diagram, but thats about it. If anyone could help me out I would greatly appreciate it. From what I've read and from what I can tell, this is a great gun to gun to have!

Pulsar
02-23-2008, 7:11 PM
The gun is almost identical to a 700. Most 700 stocks will convert to the 721 with little to no modifications. Re-barreling is exactly the same as a 700. However converting from 30'06 to .308 isn't something I'd recomend, you'd be going from a long action cartridge to a short action cartridge and that can result in feeding issues (not always, but it's a posibility).

The kick really isn't that bad on the 30'06, just get a good recoil pad on the gun and you can shoot all day no prob. Price for ammo is actually a little cheaper for 30'06 (at least for the moment) than .308. Overall you've got a good gun there, enjoy it.

jandmtv
02-23-2008, 7:12 PM
congrats on the purchase, and welcome to the forum.
sorry i cant be of any help, i know nothing about remingtons, but im sure our experts will chime in soon.

NeoWeird
02-23-2008, 7:14 PM
Ok, just to warn you, if money is tight to the point where you can't buy a Remington 700, then building it into a 'sniper' rifle is a bad idea. Upgrades alone on a popular model almost always double or triple the cost of the rifle. Add in the fact that it's a non-common model and the prices will go up even more, some times being triple for being uncommon. So unless you want to spend $3k+ (and I mean EASILY spending that much) then it's not going to be worth it.

Now if you want to start off and learn how to use the gun, then later add a scope to it, that's one thing; but you are talking about some serious money to do what you want to do. Barrel blanks alone will run you $100-200 for the CHEAP ones and then add in another $200 to have it turned down, installed, and crowned and you are probably doubling the price of the rifle, and pushing it past the price of a Remingotn 700 in .308, just to get it in the caliber you want. My suggestion is leave the rifle alone mechanically and keep it simple. More gadgets doesn't mean better and for new shooters it will be a waste of money. Most of the exspensive gadgets and gunsmithing tricks out there will only truely change the size of groups once you start hitting long ranges. For learning, don't do anything mechanical.

That said, I would first take the gun out and use it a couple times. I've heard horror stories of people taking 12g shotguns out, or Mosin-nagant carbines, etc and when I shoot them I can't see what the big fuss is about. For all you know, the gun may be the most pleasureable gun in the world to shoot. You won't know until you take it out. So take it out and put some ammo through it first. It's been my experience that .30-06 (both from an M1, 1903, and a modern rifle) has been a relateively mild experience. Yes, it kicks hard, but it's not painful. The gun just likes to jump a bit more than a smaller caliber - but my shoulder never felt a difference (in fact I think the M1 is one of the lightest recoiling rifles I've ever shouldered).

That said, this is a good chance to teach yourself the basics. The WORST thing I did when I first started shooting was put optics and a bunch of accessories on my first rifle (a Ruger 10/22). This is a BAD idea for new shooters. You need to start with the basics. For example, one of the best things that can be learned in ANY shooting sport is proper aim. Learn to use the iron sights on your rifle. Learn how to hold the rifle steady. Learn distance guaging. Learn how wind effects accuracy. I would say put a good 500 rounds through your rifle before you think about changing anything (if this is your first gun, which it sounds like it is). After that, then start to change different things. Maybe get the trigger polished and tuned to learn how a 'match' trigger will change your groups. Get the rifle free floated and bedded. Put on a scope (have a professional or someone who knows better do it for your first time - it's more than just tightening screws).

Start at the bottom and work up. The LAST thing on your mind should be spending money on it; especially if money is tight to the point where you can't get what you want. Take it from me, and just about every other person I know; 'tricking' out a rifle with aftermarket parts is a quick way to disliking your gun, using it less, and your shooting skills suffering. Looking back, I wish I would have just left my Ruger alone and shoot soda cans all day instead of trying to turn it into something it isn't - a sniper rifle. Once you understand a bit more about guns, you will find that true sniper rifles will cost you a great deal of money - many times more than a cheap car. So if money is tight, that's the last thing you want to do and it will make your shooting ability suffer.

Take the beast out and enjoy it for a couple months before you go and start to butcher it up.

Fjold
02-23-2008, 7:33 PM
The 721 is the predecessor of the 700 series rifle but there are some differences. If you look at your rear sight there is a bulge in the barrel there that the 700 doesn't have. This means that no 700 stock will be a drop in fit. The good thing about the 721 is that they are old enough so that all the parts are worn together and the actions are butter smooth. The triggers on these were made before everyone was so likely to sue so they are easily adjustable.

dfletcher
02-23-2008, 7:37 PM
Hello everyone!

Today I bought my first gun. Unfortunately, I didnt have the money to get what I would of wanted to get, I settled for a bolt-action rifle. I went with a used 721 that fit within my price range. I was also told that this gun is what the Remington 700 is based on, after it being discontinued in 1948 i believe it was.

I've done various searches on the internet, trying to find any data on the gun, as well as any after-market parts available, such as stocks. The dealer did also mention that the 721 was interchangable with most 700 parts, but he didnt specify which parts exactly.

THe 721 purchased is a .30-06, which from what I've read, has serious kickback, but it due in part largely to the fact of the stock design. I plan on changing the stock to something more modern. Ideally I would like this rifle to be built into a sniper weapon like the M40A3. I was also wondering about barrel replacements, such as, could I convert this gun to a .308? I know it probably would of been easier to go with a remington 700 right off the bat, but cash it tight and I would like to start learning how to fire a rifle.

As I said, I didnt find much information on this gun on the net. I was forunate to find a dissasembly diagram, but thats about it. If anyone could help me out I would greatly appreciate it. From what I've read and from what I can tell, this is a great gun to gun to have!

You're right - there is absolutely nothing wrong with the 721. I have plenty of 700s and my 721 in 300 H & H doesn't take a back seat to any of them. I think it has a more graceful stock and is overall a great quality product - all steel and wood and nicely fitted all around.

The trigger adjusts the same as the 700 and uses the same scope bases. When you remove and put back the floorplate I'd suggest turning the center screw in first - it has a bit of wiggle room and for me, a bit of a pain lining up with the screw hole. Then put in the front receiver screw and then the rear one, behind the trigger guard. And don't over tighten the center screw.

The 30.06 will probably bounce you around a bit. If you're determined to use 308 Win in it, you could give one of these a try. http://www.mcace.com/adapters.htm

The shorter case may or may not feed and the longer jump probably isn't best for accuracy. You could take up reloading and load down a bit.

m24armorer
02-23-2008, 10:01 PM
Ok, I'll chime in.

The rear receiver tang has to be recountoured. The tang also has to be cut to use the 700 trigger (safety). The bolt handle has to be modified also. Otherwise it is the same as a 700LA.

You cannot build a M40 series on a long action. You can do a M24 build just not the M40/A1/A3 etc.

Use a 722 for a 40 build.

Depending on serial number the rear receiver bridge my be off.

Halzman
02-24-2008, 2:25 AM
Ok, I may have jumped the gun lol I am still a bit excited over my purchase!

I have anyways had an interest in firearms but I never bought one until now. I've had experience with AR-15s and AK-47s but if I was to buy a rifle like that, i would want an AR-15. However, I could never justify the price tag on one of them so never really pursued it further. Recently I became interested in sniping, particularly in marine scout snipers. The marines have always been regarded as rifleman before anything else, and there scout sniper school being the finest in the armed services, I figured it was a good starting point. I quickly learned about the M40A1, which today is the M40A3. This rifle however is based on the Remington 700.

I had gone in the store today possibly looking to buy a shotgun, just to get my feet wet with firearms. I felt it wouldnt hurt to ask about any rifles that may be in my price range. When the dealer showed me the 721 and mentioned that the 700 was based from it, I immediately became interested.

So again, I may have jumped the gun with my expectations in terms of modifications with this rifle. I do appreciate all the great info though and the welcome to the forums! I had browsed through a few forums before I registered for one and chose this one for the simple reason of the content found through various threads. Thank you! Definitely making my new experience very smooth.
-----

I spent all evening familiarizing myself with the rifle and continuing my study of it. I've gotten fairly comfortable disassembling an reassembling the rifle, and am glad to say its pretty easy. I used a break down chart to help me, along with various pictures on the breakdown (http://www.battletone.com/firearm_manuals/Model721/index.htm). I have not broken down the bolt and the trigger assembly, for the simple reason that I dont have enough instruction on how to do so and am not too comfortable trying something like that on my own yet, but am interested in learning how to do so.

At this point I have a better idea on what I want to do with this rifle, and your responses helped me a lot in making my decisions!

- My eyes were bigger then my stomach. I'm going to stick with the .30-06 barrel and not futz around with converting it to a .308. I do have a question in regard to the round. An AK-47 uses a 7.62x39, a M40A3 uses a 7.62x51. From my understand, the .30-06 is a different round all together, in terms of dims, but I saw the number of 7.62x63. Is this correct?

- I am still interested in changing the stock; the wooden stock just isnt my thing lol. I'm really just looking for a synthetic stock that is durable, preferably black, and paint-able, as I plan to do my own camo'ing. While handling the rifle I noticed that the barrel drags the rifle towards the front, due to the barrels weight. I recall on the M40A3 stock (McMillan A4) that there is a hump on the rear of the stock. Being a science geek, I began to wonder if that hump was weighted at all, trying to compensate the drag caused by the weight of the barrel. I have also learned that the Remington 700 comes in a .30-06 config, keeping in mind that the 700 stock can be modified for the 721 - what kind of modifications are we talking about exactly? I also wanted to ask if the 721 can be converted to accept a box magazine.

- I plan on getting the Harris 6-9" bipod for my rifle. I do have some questions about the mounting though. From looking at the various adapters for the Harris bipod, wondering if I needed one, I noticed that my rifle has the same 'lug' that the adapters have, presumably the lug the bipod mounts to. Is this the case?

- While browsing remingtons website I came across this upgrade program. The 721's have this bolt lock, which prevents the unloading of the fire while its in the safe position, giving the 3 positions of fire, safe, and bolt safe. This upgrade would remove the bolt safe. Is there a significant difference between the 2 trigger assemblies? I personally dont mind it, but it is something I should probably do?

- Back to the stock issue - I realize that short term, I may not be able to replace the stock with something I want, however I would like to do something in the meantime about the recoil issue; I'm not a small guy, but i'm not a big guy either lol My friend suggested that I get a butt plate made for recoil reduction and showed me one that slipped right on. Would something like this be adequate or should I look at something that actually replaces the butt plate?

- As far as the scope goes, theres no need to get anything fancy just yet. As some people have suggested, I agree - stick to the iron sights for now. I do have a question about optics, or rather, how to read them. The scope that came with the 721 is a 3-9x40. What do these numbers mean. I figured out that the 3-9 adjusts the distance your viewing at, but what about the 40?

- Still having no luck with a basic fact sheet on the rifle. I'm looking for weight, length, barrel length, muzzle velocity, effective range, etc like fact sheet kinda info lol


Again, thanks so much for all your responses and welcomes! I still have a whole lot to learn but I'm very eager too and thats what counts - i should be alright in the end lol For those of you who dont like to read, sorry - i type a lot, bad habit of mine. I'm also still very excited over my purchase, I cant even count how many time I said "my rifle" in conversation today lol

aplinker
02-24-2008, 2:55 AM
30-06 loadings can run mild to hot (7.62x51 to near 300 win mag), so a lot depends on the rounds you're buying.

The kick isn't bad at all. You'll be fine. You'll get used to it. A pad might help, if you like it.

The hump on the McMillan A4 is to allow a proper cheek weld with a scope.

Don't worry about modifications on this rifle now (like a detachable magazine). Shoot it how it is and learn how to shoot for distance and accuracy. As you learn you'll see what you need.

3-9x on the scope refers to magnification (3x equates to seeing something at 300yds as though it were at 100yds, etc). The 40 refers to the size of the objective (and thus the light collecting ability).

The muzzle velocity and some other facts about your rifle (effective range) will depend on the ammo you choose. You can measure the barrel length and weight it when you get it.


Ok, I may have jumped the gun lol I am still a bit excited over my purchase!

I have anyways had an interest in firearms but I never bought one until now. I've had experience with AR-15s and AK-47s but if I was to buy a rifle like that, i would want an AR-15. However, I could never justify the price tag on one of them so never really pursued it further. Recently I became interested in sniping, particularly in marine scout snipers. The marines have always been regarded as rifleman before anything else, and there scout sniper school being the finest in the armed services, I figured it was a good starting point. I quickly learned about the M40A1, which today is the M40A3. This rifle however is based on the Remington 700.

I had gone in the store today possibly looking to buy a shotgun, just to get my feet wet with firearms. I felt it wouldnt hurt to ask about any rifles that may be in my price range. When the dealer showed me the 721 and mentioned that the 700 was based from it, I immediately became interested.

So again, I may have jumped the gun with my expectations in terms of modifications with this rifle. I do appreciate all the great info though and the welcome to the forums! I had browsed through a few forums before I registered for one and chose this one for the simple reason of the content found through various threads. Thank you! Definitely making my new experience very smooth.
-----

I spent all evening familiarizing myself with the rifle and continuing my study of it. I've gotten fairly comfortable disassembling an reassembling the rifle, and am glad to say its pretty easy. I used a break down chart to help me, along with various pictures on the breakdown (http://www.battletone.com/firearm_manuals/Model721/index.htm). I have not broken down the bolt and the trigger assembly, for the simple reason that I dont have enough instruction on how to do so and am not too comfortable trying something like that on my own yet, but am interested in learning how to do so.

At this point I have a better idea on what I want to do with this rifle, and your responses helped me a lot in making my decisions!

- My eyes were bigger then my stomach. I'm going to stick with the .30-06 barrel and not futz around with converting it to a .308. I do have a question in regard to the round. An AK-47 uses a 7.62x39, a M40A3 uses a 7.62x51. From my understand, the .30-06 is a different round all together, in terms of dims, but I saw the number of 7.62x63. Is this correct?

- I am still interested in changing the stock; the wooden stock just isnt my thing lol. I'm really just looking for a synthetic stock that is durable, preferably black, and paint-able, as I plan to do my own camo'ing. While handling the rifle I noticed that the barrel drags the rifle towards the front, due to the barrels weight. I recall on the M40A3 stock (McMillan A4) that there is a hump on the rear of the stock. Being a science geek, I began to wonder if that hump was weighted at all, trying to compensate the drag caused by the weight of the barrel. I have also learned that the Remington 700 comes in a .30-06 config, keeping in mind that the 700 stock can be modified for the 721 - what kind of modifications are we talking about exactly? I also wanted to ask if the 721 can be converted to accept a box magazine.

- I plan on getting the Harris 6-9" bipod for my rifle. I do have some questions about the mounting though. From looking at the various adapters for the Harris bipod, wondering if I needed one, I noticed that my rifle has the same 'lug' that the adapters have, presumably the lug the bipod mounts to. Is this the case?

- While browsing remingtons website I came across this upgrade program. The 721's have this bolt lock, which prevents the unloading of the fire while its in the safe position, giving the 3 positions of fire, safe, and bolt safe. This upgrade would remove the bolt safe. Is there a significant difference between the 2 trigger assemblies? I personally dont mind it, but it is something I should probably do?

- Back to the stock issue - I realize that short term, I may not be able to replace the stock with something I want, however I would like to do something in the meantime about the recoil issue; I'm not a small guy, but i'm not a big guy either lol My friend suggested that I get a butt plate made for recoil reduction and showed me one that slipped right on. Would something like this be adequate or should I look at something that actually replaces the butt plate?

- As far as the scope goes, theres no need to get anything fancy just yet. As some people have suggested, I agree - stick to the iron sights for now. I do have a question about optics, or rather, how to read them. The scope that came with the 721 is a 3-9x40. What do these numbers mean. I figured out that the 3-9 adjusts the distance your viewing at, but what about the 40?

- Still having no luck with a basic fact sheet on the rifle. I'm looking for weight, length, barrel length, muzzle velocity, effective range, etc like fact sheet kinda info lol


Again, thanks so much for all your responses and welcomes! I still have a whole lot to learn but I'm very eager too and thats what counts - i should be alright in the end lol For those of you who dont like to read, sorry - i type a lot, bad habit of mine. I'm also still very excited over my purchase, I cant even count how many time I said "my rifle" in conversation today lol