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View Full Version : Locktight! How to use it?


hardlyworking
01-12-2014, 6:12 AM
Happy Sunday folks!

My question is about Locktight, how and where to use it. I know there is Red + Blue and from my search of this forum Green, but Nothing really explained how and where to use it.

Can you guys tell me your favorite spots to put Locktight on a new, scoped rifle, with muzzle device? Assume I might want to change muzzle device at some point, and I might want to swap scope for a micro-red-dot occasionally.

I don't plan on any QD setups.

Thank you for your time!

Chaos47
01-12-2014, 6:18 AM
There is also purple which is the weakest.
http://www.henkelna.com/industrial/Loctite-Threadlockers-by-Color-14023.htm
http://us.henkel-adhesives-blog.com/featured_content/different_threadlockers.jpg

First of all what firearm are you talking about?
If AR then no don't put any type of Loctite on the threads of the muzzle device. Proper torque and a proper crush or peel washer are what you need.

Scope ring screws? Blue, and sparingly.

missiontrails
01-12-2014, 6:22 AM
You DONT use Locktite on muzzle devices or castle nuts. Maybe a dab of blue for scope rings. I have used Permatex high temp thread locker for bolt-on low profile gas blocks.

Merc1138
01-12-2014, 6:23 AM
You don't.

Just about everything has a proper torque setting, and you should buy yourself an inch/pound torque driver that will suffice for optics(a lot of ring and base manufacturers actually point out NOT to use loctite). Some muzzle device installations may need it(or similar products) if you don't have a crushwasher/jamnut/shims/peelwasher to torque the muzzle device against and time it correctly, but most do not(might be a couple other uses for things like gas blocks).

Loctite is the equivalent of duct tape. It's a quick fix for when a proper fix isn't available, yet people use it for everything from home to auto repair.

CrossedRifles
01-12-2014, 6:26 AM
Only thing I put loctite was for my TROY sights, a drop or two on the threads. Tightened them down decently and that was it.

On my MagPul MBUS, I've had a couple times where my POI would be changing oddly and I'd realize the screws on the sights had come loose. Hand tighten to only find out it was doing it again after a dozen or so shots. Loctite solved.

hardlyworking
01-12-2014, 7:20 AM
You don't.

Loctite is the equivalent of duct tape. It's a quick fix for when a proper fix isn't available, yet people use it for everything from home to auto repair.
Exactly! This is what prompted me to ask the question. It seems I hear people say "throw some XYZ locktight on there and problem solved" in threads on any number of subjects.

I have a 10/22 "tactical" (bought used) with an A2 style FH that comes loose at the range, and a new AR build (featureless/scoped) that I'm inquiring about. The ruger does have a crush washer but clearly my hand-tightening is not doing the trick.

bsumoba
01-12-2014, 7:39 AM
FYI...

LOCTITE CURES IN THE ABSENCE OF AIR (OXYGEN). IF IT IS EXPOSED, IT WILL NOT CURE AND WILL STAY WET.

BrianRodela
01-12-2014, 7:44 AM
A little dab will do ya is a good motto when using thread locking compound but it is most effective when the surfaces of the threads are clean from oils. Ensuring the threads are clean is very important and minimizes the amount needed.

Also a word of caution about the colors, not all manufacturers follow the same color codes for bonding. Check to see if it says the words removable and small screw on the label. Loc Tite makes a clear green that are bearing mounting compounds that are tougher than imagined.

redcliff
01-12-2014, 7:49 AM
For what it's worth the AMU uses blue Loctite on their hand tightened muzzle devices. Supposedly torqueing a muzzle device can reduce accuracy.

And Loctite is hardly "Duct Tape". It's use is required on any number of aircraft components, as well as automotive applications.

In answer to the OP's question; generally you use a very small amount on a degreased bolt's threads prior to installation.

stryper
01-12-2014, 7:52 AM
Loctite should be used sparingly. Most parts on a rifle or optic should be properly torqued and checked again after some use to make sure they're properly seated. Hand-tightening or over-tightening can cause damage to your firearm or optic and hopefully not injure the user. Certain parts that will probably never be removed from the firearm again, like a trigger guard on an Saiga conversion, I put a little dab of red loctite. Those little torx head bolts that fasten a mount or riser to a Vortex Sparc red dot body itself, not the picatinny rail, I put a dab of the blue loctite because those bolts can strip out easily (don't ask) and you definitely don't want your optic moving around.

hardlyworking
01-12-2014, 8:06 AM
Arg mixed messages!

Sounds like I need to get me a torque wrench first and foremost because the consensus seems to be properly torqued screws/bolts is required and any locktight is a personal choice on key parts kind of thing

desertrider
01-12-2014, 8:08 AM
Exactly! This is what prompted me to ask the question. It seems I hear people say "throw some XYZ locktight on there and problem solved" in threads on any number of subjects.

I have a 10/22 "tactical" (bought used) with an A2 style FH that comes loose at the range, and a new AR build (featureless/scoped) that I'm inquiring about. The ruger does have a crush washer but clearly my hand-tightening is not doing the trick.

I'm a proponent of using blue Loctite (very sparingly) on any threaded fastener that would render my firearm useless if it were to back out.

I've been at the range and had people around me have to stop shooting because something came loose and fell off. Most notably someone who was shooting a Ruger Single Six and the screw that held the plunger assembly came out and caused the tube, plunger, and spring to fall off and break apart on the range. Another time, someone had a muzzle device on an SKS that was a twist on with a set screw, it also fell off.

Adhering to torque specs is fine, but I still believe that recoil, as well as the harmonics caused by the vibrations of the bolt violently reciprocating in the action could cause fasteners to come loose. Throw in the effects of rapid firing or bump firing and I think it's possible for some fasteners to fail.

I'm a little biased though. I've ridden dirt bikes most of my life, and if it ain't loctited, it's safety wired. Nothing worse than having something important fall off 20 miles from camp.

Cadre
01-12-2014, 8:28 AM
just a drop or two depending on the size of area i use the whole bottle of red sealing the wifes pie hole to get her to shut up.

geedavell
01-12-2014, 8:46 AM
You don't.


Loctite is the equivalent of duct tape. It's a quick fix for when a proper fix isn't available, yet people use it for everything from home to auto repair.

Bullsh** !
Obviously you've never worked on large industrial equipment that is subject to vibrations.

desertrider
01-12-2014, 8:54 AM
just a drop or two depending on the size of area i use the whole bottle of red sealing the laa laa laa laa laa.

Oh no he di'ent!

We all think it, we just don't plaster it on the web.

That being said, amen brotha, preach it!

MongooseV8
01-12-2014, 9:32 AM
Red on everything ftw

Merc1138
01-12-2014, 12:37 PM
Bullsh** !
Obviously you've never worked on large industrial equipment that is subject to vibrations.

I'm sorry, did I mistake this thread for being about firearms and not large industrial equipment? My bad(also, what does equating loctite being overused on firearms to ductape being overused on cars and homes, have to do with industrial equipment? Please tell me you aren't repairing your large industrial equipment that is subject to vibrations with duct tape).

Arg mixed messages!

Sounds like I need to get me a torque wrench first and foremost because the consensus seems to be properly torqued screws/bolts is required and any locktight is a personal choice on key parts kind of thing

Except when the manufacturer specifically tells you not to. There is a reason torque specs exist, and instructions don't call for loctite.

Exactly! This is what prompted me to ask the question. It seems I hear people say "throw some XYZ locktight on there and problem solved" in threads on any number of subjects.

I have a 10/22 "tactical" (bought used) with an A2 style FH that comes loose at the range, and a new AR build (featureless/scoped) that I'm inquiring about. The ruger does have a crush washer but clearly my hand-tightening is not doing the trick.

Remove the flash hider, get yourself a new crush washer, and crush the new crush washer(kinda redundant) with the flash hider till it's lined up.

MrPlink
01-12-2014, 1:23 PM
On some firearm applications you may want to use rockset (somewhat similar to loctite but more heat resistant) on a muzzle device but it is generally for when a suppressor is involved or a barrel which doesent have a shoulder for a washer to get torqued down on.

For optics at most I've added a dab of superglue to the threads, which if you torque correctly probably is not necessary but certainly does not hurt to have a little bit of extra insurance

russ69
01-12-2014, 1:27 PM
I put it on parts that fall off. Hopefully I catch it when it is loose and not gone.

valley82
01-12-2014, 1:30 PM
Bullsh** !
Obviously you've never worked on large industrial equipment that is subject to vibrations.

This, actually most critical components on cars such as disk brakes are duct taped...I mean lock tighted and or safety wired...
I am not sure how blue or even red lock tight is a negative on any screws on a firearm, heat softens up both real well.

Darklyte27
01-12-2014, 1:51 PM
lol. wow. did someone explain what a crush washer is to him yet?